ACTING & FILM SCHOOL
The Most Hands-on Intensive Programs In The World

1-Week Photography Workshops

Tuition: $1,500(USD)     Lab Fee: $125
Overview
One week workshops are a chance to immerse yourself completely in one specific area of photographic practice in a supportive, hands-on environment that provides plenty of time for analysis of masterworks, discussion of techniques and aesthetics, shooting in the field, post-processing, and daily critique. Instructors are not only expert professional photographers, they are specialists in the genre they are teaching.

All NYFA programs teach practical skills through hands-on experience. At the end of every one-week course, you'll walk away with a portfolio of images that are concrete evidence of just how much your skills improved through complete immersion in an intensive week of photography.

How to Prepare
Most courses involve at least some component of digital darkroom editing. Comfortable working computer skills in a Mac environment are absolutely essential. If you are not completely comfortable copying and moving files, creating folders, launching and switching applications, finding System Preferences, and navigating the Finder, we urge you to take a basic Mac class before attending to avoid falling behind during editing sessions. There will be no time to review computer basics during digital darkroom sessions.

Portfolios
Portfolios may be submitted as URL links to a group of online images, or as JPEGs emailed with your application. Please limit size to no larger than 1000 pixels in the long dimension. Files should be named sequentially: FirstName_LastName_##.jpg.

Adobe Lightroom Crash Course
For the photographer looking for an affordable, one-stop solution that can handle intricate digital darkroom processing and image library management, Adobe's Lightroom offers one of the best solutions on the market. However, the software is intricate and presents significant challenges to the photographer. Do you need Lightroom if you have Photoshop? Why do images or the entire catalog keep disappearing?

This course is an intensive introduction to the key features of Lightroom for those who are new to or struggling with it. Topics will include in-depth digital darkroom techniques using the incredible RAW processor, snapshots, presets, adjustment brushes, gradients, masking, retouching, workflow including exporting to Photoshop, 8 vs. 16 bit imaging, greyscale conversions, using history, keywording, collections and smart collections, library management including offline images, long-term management strategies, and more. Printing, making online and printed portfolios, slideshows, and contact sheets will be covered briefly, but the primary focus will be RAW processing and library management techniques.

Shooting assignments will take us outside the classroom to learn how to shoot optimal RAW files to produce the best possible digital negatives, how to configure your DSLR camera to give you the most accurate sense of the RAW you're actually capturing, how your camera misinforms you, and how to handle the vast differences between the print and online world. At the end of the week, you'll walk away with a thorough working knowledge of this amazing piece of software, and a body of well-processed images organized into an electronic book.

Who Should Attend: Photographers who are comfortable operating their DSLR cameras using manual controls, who have working computer skills (preferably in a Mac environment), and who want to develop comfortable working digital darkroom and library management skills.

What to bring: A DSLR camera with manual controls, a USB or FireWire card reader or USB cable to download images from your camera, two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store your images and image library and back it up, existing RAW images that you want to work on, printing paper compatible with Epson inkjet printers (paper will be discussed in class and can also be purchased locally). Apple computers and the latest Lightroom software will be provided.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current shooting and digital darkroom skills.

Instructor: Adobe Certified Experts from the NYFA staff

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!

Developing a Personal Visual Style
If you are comfortable with your DSLR camera and RAW processing software, but feel like your images are more competent than exceptional, this course is for you. This course takes a painterly approach to digital tools, focusing less on technical lessons and more on developing perceptual skills, exposure, and digital darkroom techniques that enable you to develop a visual style that underscores your ideas. Our point of entry will be studying master examples from the history of not only photography, but also from other mediums in order to broaden our sense of possibilities. Photographers can work with digital RAW files or film scans. (A film scanner will be available, although we recommend that film photographers scan images before the course in order to focus on processing.) Photoshop will be our paintbrush, but the RAW processing techniques can be applied to any comparable software (Lightroom, Aperture, Capture One, etc.) Since the editing and printing process, digital or otherwise, is only one piece of what ultimately determines visual style, we will also discuss the effects of lenses, format size, film vs. digital capture, lighting, and art direction on your palette, and how all good style evolves organically from content and idea.

Once we understand that how we see has much more to do with what happens in our brains than in our eyes, we learn how to orchestrate the tonal palette of an image to compensate for the perceptual processing that's missing from cameras, manipulating not just global but also local contrast within tonal frameworks until an image feels "real" – or how to deliberately create entirely new visual experiences. You'll walk away with your own images printed at a level of mastery that you were never able to achieve, a confidence using Photoshop to create your own visual style, and secrets of visual imaging learned by painters 150 years before computers were conceived.

Exercises will train your eye to recognize subtle differences in color and tone, to understand what makes masterpieces of painting and photography work by analyzing the relationship between the use of contrast, color choices, and saturation, to orchestrate color relationships, and most importantly, to create a personal palette. In the process, we'll also redefine monochrome to include everything from ultra-high-contrast black and white to long greyscale, highly desaturated, recolored, hand-tinted, toned and split-toned images, and more.

We'll travel outside the lab to shoot, tackling some of the most difficult and exciting challenges for digital photographers, including dramatic and unconventional uses of light, extreme high-key and low-key imaging, re-lighting in post-production, understanding what an ideal RAW exposure looks like for any desired final result, and how to overcome the limitations of on-camera displays.

Instructor: NYFA staff

Who Should Attend: Photographers who are comfortable with the concepts of layers and masks in Photoshop, processing RAWs using Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom or Capture One (if shooting digitally), operating their DSLR cameras using manual controls, and who have working computer skills (preferably in a Mac environment).

What to bring: A DSLR camera with manual controls, a USB or FireWire card reader or USB cable to download images from your camera, two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store two copies of your images and image library (required!), existing RAW images or scans (preferably 16-bit!) that you want to work on, printing paper compatible with Epson inkjet printers (paper will be discussed in class and can be purchased locally). Apple computers and the latest Photoshop, Lightroom, and Capture One software will be provided. Also, please plan to bring images by other artists that you love for discussion and analysis, printed (preferably) or electronic.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current shooting and digital darkroom skills.

Instructor: NYFA staff

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!

Advanced Photoshop
For those who have a comfortable working knowledge of layers, masks, channels, and adjustment layers, this course delves into some of the most advanced Photoshop techniques, with the goal of achieving retouching that is utterly invisible.

Topics include color management, digital inkjet (giclée) printing, upsampling and sharpening tricks, the crucial role of rendering intents; metamerism, bronzing, large format printing and file building techniques, seamless retouching, background extensions, changing background colors, flawless masking with paths and the pen tool, the 10-channel concept for luminosity-based masks, advanced compositing using unconventional techniques, blending modes, 16- and 32-bit per channel imaging, ultra high-resolution imaging using stitching, mimicking organic and photochemical looks including distressed and textured surfaces, when to edit in CMYK vs. RGB, advanced monochrome looks, eliminating posterization and moiré patterns, clean whites and rich blacks in CMYK prints, single image, multi-image and HDR dynamic range expansion, blending modes and layer blending options, color correction and restoration, llocal vs. global contrast enhancement, achieving perfect yet believable skin, demystifying the channel mixer, radical tone and color changes, distortions via transformations, warping and liquifying, matching grain, and tricks of the trade for clean commercial looks.

Who should attend: Photographers who have a working comfort with Adobe Photoshop CS5 or later (the course will be taught using the latest version of Photoshop Extended Edition), specifically comfortable working familiarity with image and adjustment layers, layer masks, quick mask, Curves, Levels, Hue/Saturation, Selective Color, Image Size and Canvas Size. Students should also be comfortable operating their DSLR cameras using manual controls, who have working computer skills (preferably in a Mac environment), and have struggled to realize or develop a specific visual style using digital tools. Exercises will include shooting as well as editing.

What to bring: A DSLR camera with manual controls, a USB or FireWire card reader or USB cable to download images from your camera, two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store two copies of your images and image library (required!), existing RAW images that you want to work on, printing paper compatible with Epson inkjet printers (paper will be discussed in class and can be purchased locally). Apple computers and the latest Photoshop and Lightroom software will be provided. Also, please plan to bring images by other artists that you love for discussion and analysis, printed (preferably) or electronic.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current shooting and digital darkroom skills.

Instructor: Brian Dilg, Adobe Certified Expert in Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Certified Instructor, and Chair of the NYFA Photography School.
Lighting: Beyond Belief
Light is the magic that transforms the ordinary, the essential ingredient that makes the difference between a wow! and an almost. Mastering it is absolutely essential to all photography, whether you're a photojournalist or landscape shooter dependent on natural light or a commercial photographer who lives for the studio.

For photographers with a working familiarity with strobe lighting but who want to develop a personal visual style beyond three-point lighting, this course will push you to use out-of-the-box lighting techniques, including light painting, getting big results with small strobes, extreme high-key and low-key styles, creating an organic quality of light, reverse key approaches, thoroughly understanding the effect of the angle of the light relative to the camera on mood, hard vs. soft light, constructing and using gobos and unconventional diffusers, balancing strobe with ambient light in both daylight and nighttime situations, using gels to expand your color palette, color relationships and perception, use of specific lighting tools including softboxes, silks, ring flash, flags, nets, beauty dishes, gobos, grids, snoots, barn doors, V-flats, negative fill, and grip equipment; shooting tethered and live RAW processing using Capture One, why you have to shoot for the RAW, not for the screen, advanced RAW processing techniques, what to achieve in camera vs. in post-production, use of in-air and on-camera diffusion both pre-made and home-made, finding magical light anywhere, transforming "bad" lighting conditions into magic, the role of art direction, visceral elements, using the limited exposure latitude of the camera to your advantage, , and much more.

Who should attend: Photographers who have a basic knowledge of strobe lighting and who are comfortable operating their DSLR cameras using manual controls. Working computer skills (preferably in a Mac environment), and basic competence using RAW processing software (Lightroom, Photoshop, Capture One, Aperture) are also essential.

What to bring: A DSLR camera with manual controls, a USB or FireWire card reader or USB cable to download images from your camera, two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store two copies of your images and image library (required!), 1-2 portable strobes and wireless triggers if you already own them. Strobe lighting and grip equipment, Apple computers and the latest Photoshop and Lightroom software will be provided. Also, please plan to bring images by other artists that you love for discussion and analysis, printed (preferably) or electronic.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current shooting, lighting and digital darkroom skills.

Instructor: NYFA staff

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!

Introduction to the Photo Studio
This intensive introductory course is for experienced photographers who need a crash course in the technical and aesthetic intricacies of studio strobe lighting techniques. Even if you've never worked with strobes or have been intimidated by the concept of doing your own lighting, this course will explore the possibilities for creative image-making by taking you from your first tentative flash photo to a comfortable working familiarity with studio and portable strobe systems, wireless strobe triggers and slaves, diffusion options including softboxes, diffusion, umbrellas and reflectors, use of negative fill, grids, snoots, barn doors, boom arms, beauty dishes, ring light, backdrop options, C-stands, using diffusion and color gels, curtains, unconventional methods of scattering and shaping light, V-flats and more.

Concepts to be covered include falloff, effective diffuser size, shaping catchlights, lighting ratios, creating organic lighting in a studio environment, shooting for an optimal RAW but viewing processed images in real time by shooting tethered to a live RAW processor, what on-camera histograms really tell you, what to achieve in-camera vs. in post production, fashion, beauty, portraiture, still life, and splash techniques, using a complete range of grip equipment, the essential tools for any studio, and much more.

Instructor: NYFA staff

Who should attend: Photographers who have a basic knowledge of strobe lighting and who are comfortable operating their DSLR cameras using manual controls. Working computer skills (preferably in a Mac environment), and basic competence using RAW processing software (Lightroom, Photoshop, Capture One, Aperture) are also essential.

What to bring: A DSLR camera with manual controls, a USB or FireWire card reader or USB cable to download images from your camera, two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store two copies of your images and image library (required!), 1-2 portable strobes and wireless triggers if you already own them. Strobe lighting and grip equipment, Apple computers and the latest Photoshop and Lightroom software will be provided. Also, please plan to bring images by other artists that you love for discussion and analysis, printed (preferably) or electronic.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current shooting and digital darkroom skills.

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!

Digital Crash Course for Film Photographers
If you have been shooting film forever, scoffing at the masses who have flocked to digital photography, but secretly wondering if you might be missing anything, this course is for you. Taught by experts in both mediums, this course takes you through a practical immersion in the advantages and pitfalls of digital capture and digital darkroom techniques from the perspective of the film photographer.

Do you expose digital for the shadows, or protect the highlights? What makes digital look "digital" and how can you avoid it? Can you trust the screen on the back of your camera? What the heck is a RAW file? What if you want to shoot black and white? Without being able to choose a film stock, won't all your pictures look the same?

All of these questions and many more are answered as we take a hands-on immersion journey into every step of digital photography, from configuring your camera, exposure, the hidden ways in which on-camera controls mislead you, how to obtain the ideal digital "negative," the miraculous RAW format (radical non-destructive exposure, contrast, and color adjustments after you shoot – and much more!), and how to mix the best of old and new camera technology to avoid generic images. We'll also look at digital darkroom techniques for scanning, editing and printing film digitally.

Mornings will be dedicated to exercises, critique and instruction, afternoons will be dedicated to shooting in the field, and evenings will be spent focusing on digital darkroom techniques using Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop. By the end of the week, you'll know more about the intricacies of digital photography than most people who have been shooting digitally all their lives, you'll have in-depth skills with every step of the process, including the ability to create a huge range of styles from a single digital negative, output accurate digital inkjet prints, and have sound strategies to manage and locate photos in a digital image library. You'll also be able to choose the best of both film and digital tools with an understanding of their strengths and weaknesses.

Instructor: NYFA staff

Who Should Attend: Photographers who have a working understanding of the components of exposure and their relationship to each other, and who are comfortable operating SLR cameras using manual controls. Working computer skills in a Mac environment are essential.

What to bring: You will need access to a digital SLR camera for this course. NYFA has a limited number of DSLR cameras available for rental for those who cannot bring their own camera; please contact us as early as possible about reserving a rental camera. Also required are two external FireWire 800 or USB hard drives (7200RPM highly recommended) to store two copies of your images and image library. A USB or Firewire card reader to transfer your images from your memory card to computer is recommended, although your camera can also be used. Bring a portable strobe and wireless triggers if you have them. Strobe lighting and grip equipment, Apple computers and the latest Photoshop and Lightroom software will be provided.

Please bring 10 prints of your favorite photos that you shot on film, preferably that you printed yourself. We will discuss these on the first day of class and use them as the basis for comparison to digital images you will make.

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your current skills composing, exposing, and printing.

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!
Film Crash Course for Digital Photographers
Digital photography has all but taken over the world. So is film dead, or at least doomed? If your only photography experience has been in the digital world, this is your chance to find out what makes shooting film and printing in the darkroom so special, and how the photochemical workflow can produce results that can never be reproduced digitally. Perhaps more importantly, this course will give you a firsthand experience of the magical, inexplicable process of making pictures without immediately seeing a result, a process that we guarantee will make you a more thoughtful and inspired photographer.

We'll begin by comparing how analog cameras and film record light, look at the difference in exposure latitude between a digital RAW file and the negative and reversal (slide) film, and test what happens when we push our exposures past the recommended limits. Next, you'll process your film by hand in the darkroom, and learn the inextricable relationship between exposure, processing time and chemistry, and learn about the infinite "looks" that can be achieved simply by varying film stock, exposure, and processing.

You'll have a chance to shoot with medium and large format cameras, and see what a huge impact format and choice of camera can have on your work. We'll take a field trip to play with a whole shelf full of film cameras of every conceivable style and size, and discuss the pros and cons of rangefinders vs SLRs, view cameras vs. 35mm, and demystify how to choose the right film camera for your shooting style.

You'll test a wide range of color and black and white negative and reversal film stocks, see the effect of film speeds, experiment with cross processing, and learn how to digitally scan your film to make use of digital darkroom tools and gicleé (inkjet) printing. Finally, you'll enlarge your negatives to create stunning, one of a kind, hand-crafted silver prints in the darkroom, discuss multi-grade vs. fixed contrast papers, experiment with bleaching and toning, learn how to make your prints archival, and how to handle and protect them.

Most importantly, we'll stay focused on what's most important, developing your own personal visual style, digging deeper into your personal iconography, constantly discussing composition and content, and use film cameras to express your own ideas in exciting new ways. Participants are free to work on any body of work they choose, but exercises will include environmental and studio portraiture, landscape, and documentary styles.

Who should attend: Photographers who are comfortable operating a digital SLR camera using manual and controls (including at least semi-automatic metering – aperture or shutter priority mode), shooting and processing digital RAW files (preferably, although JPEG-only shooters are also welcome).

Admission requirements: A portfolio of 10 images is required for admission. These should reflect your personal visual style, skill level, and current interests.

What to bring: a film camera (medium or 35mm format recommended) with full manual controls, a variety of lenses, an incident light meter that can read flash if you have one. Recommended but not required: a tripod, a #2 yellow filter and circular polarizer filter to fit your lens, an incident or spot meter, camera bag, and comfortable shoes!

A complete list of required supplies will be emailed to participants before the course begins. (You will need to purchase rolls of film for your camera. Some B&W printing paper will be provided, but you will want to choose and purchase additional printing paper during your course.)

Enrollment: Class size is limited to 12 students. Courses fill quickly; register early and secure your place!

Instructor: NYFA staff


REQUEST FREE INFORMATION
First Name*
Last Name*
Email Address*
Mailing Address*
Country Code*
Phone Number*
City*
State
Country*
Zip Code
Preferred Start Date*

Program of Interest*

Location of Interest
Highest Level of Education:
How Did You Hear About Us?*
Please Specify:*
Have You Served in the U.S. Military?     Yes     No
* Required Information

BRIAN DILG, PROGRAM CHAIR Brian Dilg is an internationally published and collected photographer and award-winning filmmaker with over 20 years of professional teaching experience around the world. His images have been published in the New York Times, Time Out, and the Village Voice, and on book covers by Simon and Schuster, Random House and Hyperion. He has provided image retouching services to clients including Victoria's Secret, Polo Ralph Lauren, Revlon, Nike, NBC and Allure. He is an Adobe Certified Expert in Photoshop, an Adobe Certified Instructor, and a frequently consulted authority on retouching and color management hardware and software.

"Auf Wiedersehen," premiered at the 2010 Los Angeles Jewish Film Festival. He recently shot "The Greims" starring Wes Bentley (American Beauty), featured at the 2009 Vancouver International Film Festival. He previously served as the Technical Director of the film program and as the Director of the digital imaging program at the Maine Media Workshops. He did his graduate work in film production at New York University, where he was a full scholarship student. He has worked as director, cinematographer, and editor on over 70 other narrative, documentary, music video and commercial films.