Lara Gato
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  • Broadcast Journalism Update: Visit to Beijing

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    So, I am just back from a week in Beijing. It turned out to be very productive, from a number of different perspectives. In my role as Chair of the Broadcast Journalism department, I think it was definitely a success. As usual, I was “multitasking,” with three different projects in play…

    Broadcast Journalism Beijing Update

    It was great to be on the campus of the Beijing Film Academy again. I met with about 60 freshmen, who had just arrived the previous week. It was the first time many of them had heard about the New York Film Academy (NYFA), so I spoke in general terms about the school, its philosophy, facilities, and locations. However, I did play for them videos produced by current and former NYFA Broadcast Journalism students. (That includes Lara Gato’s Resume Reel; a recent “live shot” by Alyssia Taglia; and My NYFA Experience by Sara Quintana.)

    The students were a receptive audience, asking lots of good questions. Afterwards, about a dozen of them chatted with me and/or Christina He, of NYFA’s Beijing office. BFA also gave me the opportunity to contemplate what it might be like to win an Oscar…

    Broadcast Journalism Beijing Update

    Later I ran a workshop at the China Film Group. This audience was very different. It was made up of media professionals who wanted to improve and expand their skill set. Surprisingly, a number of them are interested in non-fiction film and video production.

    In addition to my standard PPT presentation, we had an extended Q&A session. Frankly, I think it was the high point of the afternoon. The participants had a chance to ask some very specific questions, about both video production as well as NYFA.

    Broadcast Journalism Beijing Update

    None of this would have been possible without Dr. Joy Zhu, NYFA’s Executive Vice President for the China Region, who did all of the preliminary work. And given my extremely limited Mandarin, without Christina I would have been left awkwardly smiling at the front of two very crowded rooms…

    As for my production work in Beijing, the schedule was — as usual — hectic. We shot at multiple locations around town, as well as spending a day in the studio. Fortunately I was working with friends, so everything was done amazingly fast. (And since the scene below was a waist shot, no one saw my wrinkled pants. It was one hot, humid day in Beijing…)

    Broadcast Journalism Beijing Update

    I ended my trip ended being interviewed by a reporter from China Daily. While the focus was on Century Masters, I talked about my new documentary Shanghai 1937 into the conversation as well. (There is going to be big news about that program very soon…)

    Now, all I have to do is get my body back on New York time…

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    September 12, 2018 • Academic Programs, Broadcast Journalism, China • Views: 714

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Chair of Broadcast Journalism Attends Digital Taipei 2018

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    Digital Taipei 2018Earlier this month, New York Film Academy (NYFA) Chair of Broadcast Journalism Bill Einreinhofer was invited to attend Digital Taipei 2018, a media production forum held in Taiwan. Einreinhofer called it “a wonderful experience.”

    In addition to attending Digital Taipei 2018, Einreinhofer was able to visit its associated trade show, which he found to much more gender diverse than similar events. “I was very impressed,” stated Einreinhofer, adding “Unlike many of the conferences I have attended, there were a significant number of women here. (Media isn’t a ‘guy’s club’ anymore!”) The various items on display were as diverse as the crowd, including many cultural takes on mainstream forms of technology and media. This included virtual reality that incorporated Chinese lanterns alongside the high-tech eyewear.

    Einreinhofer is an Emmy Award winning producer/director/writer who has developed and produced programming for PBS (PBS NewsHour), ABC (Good Morning America), CBS (60 Minutes), Discovery (Spacewalkers: The Ultimate High-Wire Act) and HBO (Diary of a Red Planet) among many other distinguished credits. He is currently producing the feature film Invisible Love, starring NYFA alum Kazy Tauginas. Digital Taipei 2018

    Einreinhofer is very committed to his students, and took the opportunity in Taiwan to showcase samples of some of NYFA’s recent graduates from our broadcast journalism school. This included Broadcast Journalism graduate Lara Gato’s fabulous Resume Reel and recent work by NYFA alum and multimedia journalist (MMJ) Alyssia Taglia.

    Gato and Taglia are just two of the many successful alumni who have graduated from NYFA, one of the country’s top broadcast journalism schools. The core of the NYFA’s Broadcast Journalism program is learning to work both behind and in front of the camera in a location (New York City) that affords aspiring broadcast journalists a huge variety of professional options and challenges students to become resourceful digital reporters who can handle every aspect of covering a story.

    In addition to the conference and trade show, the trip allowed Einreinhofer to explore Taipei, a city that combines modern architecture with traditional urban scenes and cultural touchstones. 

    Einreinhofer made note to give a special thank you to Shawn Tsai, Manager of the Digital Content Industry Promotion Office, who helped organize and coordinate the trip. While we’re glad Einreinhofer got to share his experience and knowhow with Digital Taipei 2018, the New York Film Academy is certainly happy to have him back in New York working closely with the students of our Broadcast Journalism school!

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  • Broadcast Journalism Alumni Reporting From CGTN Beijing, CW 33, and More!

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    There is no better source of information regarding trends in American journalism than the Knight Foundation. The foundation is funded by the proceeds of the sale of the national Knight-Ridder newspaper chain, which took place just before the business model for local newspapers collapsed.

    Strictly nonpartisan, and rooted in the realities of journalism today, the foundation just posted a report on the impact of new media on local TV news. The summary is well-worth reading, as it explains how local TV news has — so far — avoided the dramatic decline in viewership seen by network news programs. It also exams the strategies stations are using to become cross-platform distributors of news.

    Ongoing trade tensions between the United States and China have meant some very long days for NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Grace Shao. Here is her summary of one of those days, reporting for CGTN from Beijing:
    What a day! Woke up at 0500 to the White House’s announcement of a proposed tariff on 100 bln dollars worth of Chinese goods … then proceeded to do a live cross with DC at 0800, 0900, 0930 and live cross with Beijing at 1400 while waiting for the Chinese MFA & MOFCOM’s official response … at 1700 I aired a pkg summarizing the U.S.-China trade tension which was aired again at 1900 … at 2030 MOFCOM held a press briefing and I finally got to wrap up the day with the official response, finishing a final package at 2300….and now sitting on my couch, I’ve never felt more satisfied eating a tub of ice cream!
    Closer to home, alum Melissa Aleman has moved from New York City to the heart of Texas — Dallas, to be precise. And after doing some freelance work, she is about to start working at CW 33.
    I wanted to fill you in on the CW 33 journey. I got the job as AP for NewsFix! I’m very excited for this opportunity. I will be starting April 18! Thank you for everything you and the instructors taught me in NYFA! 
    BTW, you may have seen Melissa’s picture in the current NYFA Viewbook. That’s Melissa on the right … Her classmate with the camera, Lara Gato, is now an Associate Producer at CBS News.
    As for myself, I am just back from Vietnam where I was working on a joint China/Vietnam/U.S. project. It’s something of an understatement to say it was a “challenge” working in three languages, but it was a great experience. I ended up spending a good deal of time in the countryside, including up in the Central Highlands, which saw far too much fighting during what is known there as “The American War.” Da Nang, which used to be more of a small town than a city, has grown exponentially…
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  • Jan. 22 Updates from the New York Film Academy’s Broadcast Journalism School

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    Being a journalist isn’t a 9-to-5 job. News happens when it happens, and we have to cover it. But President Donald Trump’s arrival in Washington, D.C. has made every administration that preceded it look tame. In fact, it has forced news gathering organizations — all of them, not just the “mainstream” variety — to change how they do business.

    Awhile back, The New York Times posted a fascinating story on how — to steal a line from a NYC radio station — “the news watch never stops.” Given the events of this past weekend, with the U.S. government partially closed by a budget impasse, and more than a million women demonstrating around the country, I thought it would be a good time to share this article. (Click on the link, if only to see the great graphic in motion!)

    The start of a new year often signals big changes, and that certainly seems to be the case with NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Grace Shao, who writes:
    “Happy new year friends! All the best wishes to you in 2018! Happy to tell you all I’m moving to Shanghai … to pursue a new role with CGTN, covering the worlds fastest growing economy in one of the most vibrant metropolises!”
    Grace is currently spending a lot of time shuttling between Beijing (PEK) and Shanghai (PVG or SHA). I hope she is saving up all those frequent flyer miles…
    And speaking of frequent flyers, NYFA alum Gillian Kemmerer is in Davos (again) this week, covering the annual World Economic Forum for Asset TV.
    And on the “news watch” over at CBS News is recent NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Lara Gato. Last Monday she reported to work at CBS’ digital news operation, where she will be working as an associate producer.
    And who was assigned to instruct her on CBS policies and procedures? NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss!
    Meanwhile, back on Battery Place, NYFA was one of the co-sponsors of Shanghai Film Week New York. I was honored to be chosen to participate in an Industry Panel discussion of U.S./PRC co-productions. As part of my presentation, I spoke about the three “rules” that underlie successful co-productions. One of which is, “Everything is based on relationships.”
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  • New York Film Academy Alum Hired by CBS News and Trained by Fellow Alum

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    This week, 2017 NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduate Lara Gato began work as an Associate Producer at CBS News. To add to what is already a proud moment for her alma mater, Gato is being trained by 2015 NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss.

    Lara Gato  came to the New York Film Academy from her home in Madrid, Spain, to pursue her dream to become a journalist. Her fantastic work was recently featured on the NYFA Blog as a standout example of a professional reel.

    NYFA Alumna and CBS News Associate Producer Lara Gato

    “The reel doesn’t get you the job,” NYFA Chair of Broadcast Journalism Bill Einreinhoffer explained to the NYFA Blog. “The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.”

    Nour Idriss, who is training Gato at CBS News, moved to New York City from her home in Aleppo, Syria. It was while still completing her program at NYFA that Nour was encouraged by a NYFA guest speaker to apply for work at CBS News. She used a story she did as a NYFA student to help secure a role. She works both in the production team for “The CBS Evening News Weekend Edition” and as a freelance associate producer for video at CBS.com.

    With “The CBS Evening News,” Idriss told the NYFA Blog she produces and edits VO’s, teases, and packages, overseeing headlines and assisting with gathering research and material. On the digital side at CBS.com, she During the uses a suite of software to publish web content.

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Lara Gato and Nour Idriss for their success and looks forward to hearing more from them at CBS News.

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  • Demo Reels Demystified with New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer

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    As much fun as it can be to watch contestants struggle on “American Idol” or “The Voice,” we never want to experience that kind of rejection in our own real-life “auditions” for in the news industry. Broadcast journalists know right off the bat that the most important tool in a job search — besides strong instincts, cutting-edge skills, and hard work — is a persuasive demo reel that demonstrates the outstanding talent and skills you can bring to an organization.

    But in a deeply competitive market, what makes a broadcast journalism reel truly fantastic? How can broadcast journalists set themselves apart? At the New York Film Academy, Broadcast Journalism Department Chair Bill Einreinhofer believes in sharing precisely this kind of up-to-date industry insight with his students.

    “A great reel looks and sounds distinctive,” he explains. “That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.”

    NYFA alumna Lara Gato.

    Many have heard the common advice that busy news producers and station directors will probably only spend a few seconds watching your reel and then stop if they’re not hooked. So you put your best material first on the reel to get them to actually watch your, and call you in for an interview … but how do you know what material is your best material? How do you make your reel better? Who should you work with to put the reel together?

    Questions like this are important for even experienced journalists to take a moment to consider when putting together their reel. Mr. Einreinhofer took the time to share some examples of great NYFA alumni reels, together with insights about crafting the strongest reels with the NYFA Blog. Check out stellar reel examples from NYFA alumni Lara Gato and Alyssa Cruz, along with Mr. Einreinhofer’s advice on crafting a winning broadcast journalism reel.

    NYFA alumna Alyssa Cruz.

    NYFA Blog: What separates a great broadcast journalism reel from a decent reel?

    BE: A great reel looks and sounds distinctive. That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.

    You don’t save your best for the end. Rather, you put it at the very top. Otherwise, whoever is screening the reel will likely never see it. In addition, “one size does not fit all.” Just as you tailor your resume to match a job posting, your reel should reflect the elements and abilities that are mentioned in that posting.

    NYFA: Can a student create a great reel on their own, or should they work with others — and who?

    BE: It is always a good idea to discuss a reel with your colleagues, friends and (if you have one) your mentor. What might seem clear and easy-to-understand could, in fact, be less than obvious. “Fresh eyes” are always valuable.

    NYFA: Why does the reel matter so much for broadcast journalists? What’s its purpose?

    BE: The reel doesn’t get you the job. The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.

    NYFA: What’s the difference between a student reel and a professional reel? What do industry insiders look for?

    BE: For on-air talent, the key is to be authentically yourself. Television is a personality-driven medium, and that continues to hold true even today when many people watch “television” on a variety of mobile devices, but not a television.

    The one thing that makes you different from all the other people applying for the job you want if your own uniqueness. Use that to your advantage, so you will stand out from the crowd.


    Ready to learn more about crafting an incredible reel and polishing your skills as a broadcast journalist? Apply today for the New York Film Academy’s Broadcast Journalism School.

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