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  • New York Film Academy Documentary Film Festival Screens 5 Fantastic Student Docs

    The New York Film Academy recently celebrated The New York Film Academy Documentary Film Festival, offering a showcase of five exceptional thesis documentaries from our conservatory students.

    Held at the NYFA Theatre at the New York City campus, the festival served not only as a thesis presentation, but also a professional launch and celebration of an exceptional group of filmmakers. The surprising, compelling stories and unique visions of the Spring ’17 Documentary Filmmaking Conservatory carried a delighted audience of fellow NYFA students, friends, faculty, and staff around the globe and through a series of remarkable worlds you’d never have known existed.

    Screened at the festival were the following films:

    "Jatar" by Braulio Jatar

    “Running Out of Freedom” Directed by Braulio Jatar

    Braulio Jatar’s father, a high-profile Venezuelan dissident, is dying in prison. But the capture order on Braulio’s head makes returning to the country extremely dangerous. His family won’t allow it. But with his father’s life in the balance, and the Resistance gathering to make one last stand, the young journalist has decided to risk his life to fight for his father and for his country.

    “Cricket Liu” Directed by Julia Cheng

    An aging master of the ancient culture of cricket fighting now uses the art to entertain an endless river of tourists, earning all he possibly can, to send in precious red envelops as gifts to the beloved little grandson he is not allowed to know.

    “Gold Flakes” Directed by Santiago Machado

    A courageous father navigates Colombian rainforests, gleaning the last flakes of El Dorado’s gold.

    But it’s drying up. The abandoned mines threaten collapse, a guerilla army is taking over the area, and the government is trying to starve out the gleaners with new taxes and tightening regulations. Still, his family will eat tonight if he can find just one good gold flake.

    “The Future is Rotten” Directed by Nancy Dionne 

    Forests of the Pacific Northwest hold a rare treasure. A secret culture of foragers spend their lives hunting it. Its coveted flavor can bring up to $1000 per kg. But the Matsutake mushroom’s true genius is as a healer of ruined landscapes, and it may offer the best hope for an American forest system run amuk.

    “Sword Swallower” Directed by Katerina Olkhovaya 

    Notorious circus artist Magnificent Jewels makes a career of death-defying performances. Even outside the limelight, the vulnerable if hardened sword swallower sacrifices all for the burlesque circus that from Berlin, to Brussels, to Paris must always go on.

    Congratulations to our Spring ’17 Documentary Filmmaking Conservatory class! It was truly a proud and triumphant night for our documentary community.

  • New York Film Academy Youth Program Grad Lily Buchanan in Syfy’s Happy!

    New York Film Academy kids Filmmaking camp grad and child actor Lily Buchanan recently had a starring turn in Syfy’s dark comedy series, Happy!

    Happy! stars acclaimed actor and New York Film Academy Guest Speaker Christopher Meloni as a degenerate ex-cop-turned-hit-man who, after flatlining in the line of duty, is brought back to life — only to discover he can now see and hear a child’s invisible friend, an animated blue unicorn named Happy. Needless to say, bizarre and thrilling antics ensue.

    The surprising, gritty, and hilarious show is based on the graphic novel of the same name by Darick Robertson and Grant Morrison.

    In Happy!, Lily Buchanan portrays the role of Jamie in not one, not two, but three episodes. We don’t want to give away any spoilers, so you’ll have to check out the show on Amazon Prime — just be aware that viewer discretion is advised, as the storyline of Happy! doesn’t shy away from violence or mature topics.

    Happy! is one in a string of recent successes for New York City-based child actor Lily Buchanan, who has also churned out scene-stealing performances in 2018’s Real Love and The After Party.

    Buchanan carved out time in her busy schedule over the last holiday season to take on the New York Film Academy’s intensive Holiday Filmmaking Camp for Kids. During her time at the Academy, she enjoyed a special opportunity to see Dominique Morisseau’s original play, PIPELINE, at the Lincoln Center Theater (LCT) — and got meet the play’s star, NYFA Instructor Jaime Lincoln Smith.

    Congratulations on your role in Happy!, Lily — we look forward to seeing what’s next on the horizon!

  • New York Film Academy Alum Receives International Film Festival Manhattan Award

    Jameelah Rose del Prado Lineses

    Jameelah Rose del Prado Lineses

    New York Film Academy (NYFA) alum Jameelah Rose del Prado Lineses knows first-hand how much hard work goes into making a film—which makes her Honorable Mention at 2017’s International Film Festival Manhattan all the more rewarding. In October, after screening her documentary “The Lifestyles of Expats in Jeddah,” Jameelah was the proud recipient of the IFFM’s Film Festival Director Louie Award Honorable Mention.

    This isn’t Jameelah’s first award, either. Her previous documentaries, “Historic Jeddah” and “Our Journey to Hijaz” have also garnered significant praise from multiple festivals in the last several years.

    2017’s International Film Festival Manhattan

    2017’s International Film Festival Manhattan

    A recurring theme in her work is the challenge women face while living in Saudi Arabia. The uphill battle women face, especially in filmmaking, has helped focus her vision and strengthen her voice.

    Jameelah first attended the New York Film Academy’s 8-Week Filmmaking Workshop in June 2011, before enrolling two months later in the 1-Year Filmmaking program at the New York City campus. There, Jameelah was given hands-on training with state-of-the-art film equipment and taught the skills necessary for pre-production through post-production.

    This intensive education prepared Jameelah for a career in filmmaking.“My instructors at NYFA ensured their students after graduation are already well-rounded and equipped to work in any film department,” stated Jameelah.

    Even after making several documentaries and garnering numerous honors, Jameelah still applies the training she received at NYFA. “I made sure that I took down notes for every class,” said Jameelah, adding, “I still have all my notes until now, and I review it at times when I need a refresher.”

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Jameelah on her Honorable Mention for “The Lifestyles of Expats in Jeddah,” and looks forward to the important stories she will tell in the future!

    The Lifestyles of Expats in Jeddah

    The Lifestyles of Expats in Jeddah

    January 18, 2018 • Filmmaking, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 2517

  • Packed House For New York Film Academy Gold Coast Screening

    NYFA May 2017 Diploma of Filmmaking End of Year Screening & Graduation

    For New York Film Academy Gold Coast’s May 2017 Diploma Filmmaking students, the holidays didn’t just represent the end of 2017, but the end of a year of learning, training and artistry. On the 21st of December, the group held their graduation at Event Cinema Pacific Fair, along with the End of Year Screening of their final films.

    With a packed house of friends and family, the group of talented, passionate filmmaking students were able to share their achievements in a tangible way, by showcasing the films their vision and hard work made manifest. By having a full theatre audience and seeing their final films up on a big screen, the students got a taste of what their future careers could look like. Being inspired and surrounded by loved ones, the filmmakers were able to celebrate the holidays and their accomplishments of 2017 all at once.

    In addition to gaining vital filmmaking skills, learning by doing, and applying them to their work, the students’ time at NYFA was valuable in other ways. Filmmaking lecturer Trevor Hawkins elaborated, “What is apparent—apart from learning the art and craft of filmmaking, after spending the year working on each others’ films—the students have formed bonds and connections that will continue on into their professional filmmaking careers.”

    NYFA May 2017 Diploma of Filmmaking End of Year Screening & Graduation

    NYFA May 2017 Diploma of Filmmaking End of Year Screening & Graduation

    Indeed, forming relationships with colleagues is just as important to the collaborative art of making movies as the practical skills needed to bring them to life. While this is just the beginning of their careers, the students were already showing off their distinct talents. Each of their final films portrayed their own unique voice, and demonstrated just how much they’ve grown since starting the program in May.

    Hawkins added, “We wish them all the best and look forward to all their future projects.” The New York Film Academy congratulates the students on their films and a job well done!

  • New York Film Academy Alumnus Yassin Koptan Brings Cairokee’s “Layla” to Life

    New York Film Academy filmmaking alumnus Yassin Koptan has done what many young filmmakers dream of doing: he made a music video for his favorite rock band.

    Cairokee is a band pushing the boundaries of censorship in their native Egypt. When the General Authority for Censorship of Works of Art would not release the album, the band circumvented their authority and posted “A Drop of White” on YouTube on July 11, 2017. Their song “Al-Kayf” has over 53 million views.

    In the fervor of that historic release, NYFA alum Koptan wanted to participate in the moment and make a video that would bring the band to a more global audience.

    Cairokee is well known for their unique style and their political message, so it may seem strange that Koptan opted to make a music video for one of their more intimate tracks. “‘Layla’ is one of the first Cairokee songs with a personal feel to it,” Koptan explained. “I love art driven by political expressions, but I wanted to be way less on the nose about things. ‘Layla’ was one of the few songs where I was able to do that. I wanted to approach things creatively and universally without interfering with the band’s current image.”

    The band’s current image is sleek and clean, and Cairokee frequently appears in coordinated outfits. In the first music videos they released for “Drop of White,” each member is dressed entirely in black and performs in a circle. Koptan subverts this imagery in his interpretation of ‘Layla.’ He chooses instead to use bright, almost neon, colors.

    Koptan believes a large part of the album’s success was due to the permeating themes of young love. “Everyone I spoke to about ‘Layla’ saw bright visuals when listening to the song. It is the classic boy meets girl love story,” he said.

    But the introduction of a bright color palette wasn’t enough of a change for Koptan. His story focuses on an elderly man who wakes up to discover his partner has passed in her sleep. Unable to accept the loss, he does everything in his power to bring her back. At first, he splashes her with water. Then, he tried to jump-start her heart. Eventually, the old man decides he does not care if she’s dead. He’s going to love her anyway.

    Koptan elaborated on this decision saying, “I discouraged myself from the safe choice. I decided to make something that truly represented the test of eternal love. What is more painful than accepting the loss of a soul mate?”

    The choice turned out to be a rather controversial one. “Audiences in Egypt are not used to stories that mix love and death,” said Koptan.

    Even so, many Egyptians’ tagged their friends in the comments section of the YouTube video. According to Koptan, a common discourse was whether or not the video could be considered art.

    “No matter which way they felt, I was flattered,” Koptan explained. “The video has over 10,000 views on YouTube and more people watch it every day.”

    Specifically, Koptan credited NYFA Instructor William Dickerson with a motto he was fond of using on set. “(Dickerson) told us limitations breed creativity. When we didn’t have enough dresses and suits for the mannequins on set I simply asked my crew, ‘What would our limited protagonist do?’ He would improvise! This philosophy was the heart of the production.”

    As with most independent productions, money was a constant struggle. “I did not have all the funds to make the movie until the day before we were scheduled to film,” Koptan said. By working as an editor for a marketing company and freelancing in his spare time, Koptan was able to pull together the $6,000 needed for the two-day shoot.  

    Koptan described the work as rewarding. “I had to balance not just earning the finances, but managing them for the film as well. I was the director, producer, and the writer. Each job requires extensive preparation before we could begin production. But, it was all worth it. These are the challenges all independent filmmakers face.”

    The New York Film Academy would like to congratulate Yassin Koptan for all of his success. We look forward to the next project.

  • New York Film Academy Alum Uzair Merchant is Best Indie Director at Los Angeles Film Awards

    In the middle of a the entertainment industry’s award season, it’s easy to see how a prestigious award can mean more than its weight in glitter or gold. Winning an award is a remarkably exciting way for artists to share their stories and receive recognition for a job well done, and we are proud to congratulate one such New York Film Academy alum.

    New York Film Academy (NYFA) filmmaking graduate Uzair Merchant has been busy since completing his filmmaking workshop at NYFA New York City. With production credits with the BBC, Marvel Studios, Universal Pictures, Paramount Pictures, and more, the triple-degree black belt has also launched his own award-winning production company, and recently snagged the competitive Best Indie Filmmaker Award from the Los Angeles Film Awards.

    The NYFA Blog had a chance to sit down and catch up with the award-winning filmmaker and production designer to hear more about his film “Chasing Lines,” what inspires him, and what’s next.

    NYFA: First, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and what brought you to the New York Film Academy?

    UM: I’m an Indian filmmaker who grew up in Dubai. My background is in production and set design, which I studied at Nottingham Trent University in England. However that was always a path for me wanting to make films: understanding the creative side. Some of the greatest filmmakers like Sir Ridley Scott and Alfred Hitchcock were part of art departments before making it as mainstream filmmakers. It’s the one side of film that has retained its roots in cinema, with the process just using different tools now.

    Learning to make films in New York [at the New York Film Academy] was a dream though, especially with the alumni list of NYFA. It’s in the heart of it all! Could you believe telling a kid in dubai in the ‘90s, “You can make films in new york at the film academy”? It was literally a dream.

    NYFA: Do you have any favorite NYFA moments or classes from your time studying with us?

    UM: Lots of moments! Every day was a moment of its own, but learning the traditional ways of film, actually spooling it in, the process of measuring everything — it was amazing.

    Most of all, it was the people around me. I made some of the best friends there who were all amazing in their own way, and learning off of each other was amazing. I’m sure we’ll make more films together.

    NYFA: Why did you choose filmmaking? And what inspires you most as a filmmaker?

    UM: The freedom of telling a story. Film to me is the best medium that you can use to connect with an audience, and immerse them into any world you create. Suddenly you have this power of speaking through the voice of another artist, along with the whole crew, all working towards that moment, that one amazing moment.

    I like waking up knowing that morning I can be living in a world of the 10th century or 100 years in the future for the next few weeks or days or months. It’s exciting.

    Social realism inspires me the most. I like observing life around me, especially when I’m traveling. Then, “Life imitates art, far more than art imitates life.” (Oscar Wilde)

    NYFA: Can you tell us a bit about your process in creating “Chasing Lines,” and what motivated you to bring this project to life?

    UM: “Chasing Lines” is a sequel to a short film I made eight years back, “In Between Lines,” which was about comparing roads to people. Hopefully eight years from now, I’d like to make “Beyond Lines” — and then it will be an overall 15 minute trilogy made over 16 years.

    The first film, “In Between Lines,” was about figuring out the paths of life and comparing roads to people. “Chasing Lines” is about realizing the chase of life, but trying to understand the why. It’s a dialogue with the earth. Hopefully “Beyond Lines” will be about .. who knows? I’ve always been obsessed with that question of purpose of life and how connected we are in such a weird magical network of a universe.

    On the technical side of “Chasing Lines,” I wanted to explore. You see how the smartphone has kind of taken over everything, and if that is the future in some weird way I wanted to explore it, so the whole thing — even the voice-over — is recorded on the iPhone. The poster image is also taken on the iPhone.

    It was challenging, especially doing the long time-lapse shots that lasted 20-30 minutes each. Fun, though.

    NYFA: “Chasing Lines” just won Best Indie Filmmaker at the Los Angeles Film Awards. Congratulations! For our students, do you have any advice on what you learned through the process?

    UM: Thank you so much!

    Honestly my advice to NYFA students is to make the films they want to make. On the process, I don’t think anyone should let things change or shape their film. It’s good to get inspired through different things, but there isn’t really one set way I think…

    Maybe that’s the best advice: get inspired.  

    NYFA: Would you say your time at NYFA was at all useful in terms of the work you are doing now?

    UM: Oh, for sure: NYFA teaches you fundamentals you are expected to know and understand in the professional world. Simple things, but important — like basic rules of filmmaking and understanding the whole process from start to end.

    NYFA: What’s next for you? Any upcoming screenings or new projects you’d like to tell us about?

    UM: There are things in the pipeline, mainly my feature that I’ve been working on for about eight years as well, called “Elixir Of Life.” I’d hope to get that kicked off soon…

    I also do production design for a theme park in Dubai called Global Village, and we design and build pavilions for each country. It’s pretty cool, like a massive standing film set for six months. That’s the first part of my year coming up and even though it’s so wild and crazy with the scale of it all, it’s fun — and you learn a lot very fast. You have to. Plus, I get to work with my parents on it! We each have our areas on the project and its all connected and feeds into the bigger picture.

    NYFA: Anything I missed that you’d like to speak on?

    UM: I have my own production company called B Kreativ Productions, based out of Dubai and recently Vancouver too. We are a multi-award-winning production company and it’s something I’d like to grow over time by adding creative value by exploring and merging with new talent and work. My relationship with NYFA and my university Nottingham Trent gives us the opportunity to grow, and we are lucky to have that!

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Uzair Merchant for sharing a part of his story with our community, and congratulate all our alums who are working hard to shape the industry for the better.

  • Harper’s Bazaar Profiles New York Film Academy Alum Khadijah Kudsi

    Khadijah Kudsi

    Copyright © Harper’s Bazaar Arabia 2017

    With the 14th Annual Dubai International Film Festival coming to a close this December, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia profiled six pioneering female filmmakers from the Middle East, including New York Film Academy (NYFA) alum Khadijah Kudsi. The in-depth piece about the six directors not only celebrates their hard work and achievements, but highlights the cultural shift taking place in the 21st Century Middle East, and subsequent progress women have made in playing a larger role in society—including the arts.

    NYFA alum Khadijah Kudsi grew up in Saudi Arabia and was always artistic and interested in storytelling. She told Harper’s Bazaar, “I went to New York Film Academy in Abu Dhabi in 2014. I only meant to go for four weeks, but that turned into eight, which led into a year and then into a whole career. I did a diploma in filmmaking and then I started working on short films and writing.”

    After graduating from the Academy, Kudsi quickly found work for a Chinese television channel. As her career has progressed, Kudsi likes to focus on stories from Abu Dhabi and the Middle East, including one film that’s premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and another currently in production focusing on Dana Al Ali—the first Emirati woman to climb Mt. Everest.

    Kudsi continued, “I think it’s important to have ties to this region and highlight positive stories coming out of it. But it’s not always easy—the funding is hard. As is finding the right producer and managing your time being a mother and a working woman.”

    Festivals in the Middle East have grown in importance as more and more voices from the region are making themselves heard. The Dubai International Film Festival (DIFF) first launched in 2004 with 76 films and 13,000 attendees. During its initial six-day run, acting legend Omar Sharif was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award. The festival has steadily grown since then, with over 60,000 admissions to its 2016 event. This year marked the 14th Annual Dubai International Film Festival and presented Lifetime Achievement Awards to Irrfan Khan and Sir Patrick Stewart.

    As the region modernizes and women are being given more and more freedom, their roles in society are becoming more prominent as well. For Middle Eastern women working in the arts, that uphill struggle feels all the more real, considering the industry has been historically unequal not just in the region but around the world. Kudsi told Harper’s Bazaar, “I have four children, whereas most of the crew you work with on set are single or have no kids. They don’t understand when you say you need to wrap by a certain time because I need to go see my kids.”

    The New York Film Academy strives to give filmmakers and artists of all kinds a voice, and prides itself on its diverse student body. By learning and working hands-on together, students find their differences are a strength—learning and sharing experiences not just from the school but from one another. If you’re interested in filmmaking or the visual arts, you can find more information about NYFA’s programs here.

    NYFA has committed itself to giving aspiring storytellers in the Middle East an education they can build their careers on. The New York Film Academy is thrilled to see Khadijah Kudsi recognized for her inspiring work and career, and looks forward to the stories she will tell in the years to come. “I love the rawness in the stories here,” professed Kudsi, “and we have so much to talk about.”

    December 27, 2017 • Abu Dhabi, Film Festivals, Filmmaking, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1180

  • New York Film Academy Establishes Graduate Student Award with Spanish Fulbright Commission

    The New York Film Academy College of Visual & Performing Arts (NYFA) and the Fulbright Commission in Spain recently marked the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding establishing a very special Fulbright Graduate Student Award to support young talented Spanish filmmakers.

    The memorandum was signed by NYFA President Michael J. Young and the Fulbright Commission in Spain’s Executive Director, Alberto Lopez San Miguel, and was formally presented at a ceremony at the Commission’s office in Madrid, by the famous Spanish filmmaker, and NYFA founding faculty member, Pablo Berger.

    Filmmaker and NYFA founding faculty member Pablo Berger (left) with Spanish Fulbright Commission Director Alberto Lopez San Miguel (right).

    “The New York Film Academy is a proud to welcome many Fulbright students from around the world to study with us and join our diverse international community of creative visual and performing artists,” said President Young. “The NYFA Leadership greatly appreciates this opportunity provided to the College by the Fulbright Commission in Spain. This extraordinary collaboration on the Fulbright Graduate Student Award will provide truly remarkable opportunities for rising Spanish filmmakers to pursue NYFA’s Master of Fine Arts degree in Filmmaking. 

    The November call-for-application announcement of the Fulbright Graduate Student Award garnered enormous attention in the Spanish visual arts community, and dozens of qualified students applied. The award covers full tuition for the NYFA two-year MFA Program, round-trip travel, a monthly living stipend and a special-project grant fund.

    The selection of the awardee is in process by the Fulbright Commission in Spain, and the decision by the Commission and NYFA will be announced in the coming weeks.

    The Fulbright Program is one of the most prestigious awards programs worldwide, designed to increase mutual understanding between the people of the U.S. and the people of other countries. Fifty-three Fulbright alumni have won Nobel Prizes; 78 have won Pulitzer Prizes.

    The New York Film Academy (NYFA) is privileged to have NYFA Fulbright Program alumni as part of its faculty, including NYFA Director of Fulbright Initiatives Miguel Cruz, a former Fulbright Graduate Student from Spain who studied at NYFA 2006-2008. In the past decade, NYFA has been honored to be the host institution to more than 50 Fulbright international students from nearly 30 nations.

    December 14, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Film School, Filmmaking • Views: 943

  • A Look at Art Basel 2017 by New York Film Academy South Beach

    Miami: home of bikinis, sunshine, and Art Basel.  Sure, Art Basel happens in other cities around the world, but nothing beats the annual event that takes over the city of Miami each winter, drawing artists and visitors from around the world to explore new themes and cutting-edge creations in contemporary art. Up-and-coming artists, celebrities, and everyone in between make their way to Miami in order to take part in the numerous events, private showings and parties, the VIP after parties and more every December.

    This year New York Film Academy (NYFA) South Beach was proud to collaborate with two of the biggest Art Basel events, Spectrum and PULSE.

    During the Spectrum event, NYFA South Beach had the privilege to showcase some alumni and faculty work. We also hosted an incredible panel with featured artists Naomi White, Angelika Rinnhofer, and Jon Henry, which was lead by New York Film Academy Chair of Photography David Mager. The panel and photography showcase created a buzz throughout the Spectrum/Red Dot event for the rest of the week.

    NYFA South Beach also partnered with Pulse,  creating visual work for their Perspectives project, featuring private interviews with this year’s presenting artists Mindy Solomon (owner of the Mindy Solomon Gallery), Carolina García Jayaram (CEO of the National YoungArts Foundation) and Donna Ruff.

    NYFA South Beach’s Perspectives video spotlights were a part of an installment at the entrance of the Pulse VIP area. Viewers were able to enjoy the video one at a time, creating an exclusive experience while still channeling the fun and artwork that surrounded the venue.

    Celebrity sightings were another exciting feature of Art Basel this year, with Jonathan Cheban, Scott Disick, Alec Monopoly, and Owen Wilson winding their way through the exhibits. New York Film Academy’s very own Sally Nieves was also interviewed by a local television show called Vibes and Views Miami!

    Between Spectrum, Pulse, Art Basel and New York Film Academy, social media was buzzing all week long. If you missed out, make sure to stay tuned for next year’s Art Basel events, which we hope will be even bigger and better!

    NYFA South Beach is proud to participate in PULSE and Spectrum, and looks forward to next year’s Art Basel festivities.

  • “Mindhunter” Screening with Guest Speaker Happy Anderson at New York Film Academy

    David Fincher’s critically-acclaimed Netflix series “Mindhunter” has been described by Slant Magazine as “addictive and resonant,” and features the work of two New York Film Academy (NYFA) instructors.

    In the wake of David Berkowitz (aka “Son of Sam”), Charles Manson and others, a new team within the FBI was formed to psychologically analyze the minds of killers. “Mindhunters” focuses on the early days of the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU) as its members struggle to understand the minds of serial killers, a term which had not yet been coined. The series stars New York Film Academy Musical Theatre Master Class lecturer Jonathan Groff, while veteran actor and NYFA instructor Happy Anderson is featured in two episodes of Season 1 in the chilling role of imprisoned killer Jerry Brudos.

    Jonathan Groff and Happy Anderson in a still from “Mindhunters,” via IMDB.

    This week, Anderson will return to NYFA’s New York City campus as a special guest in the New York Film Academy’s Guest Speaker Series, to share insights with students and discuss his career — which has included roles on acclaimed shows such “The Knick,” “Boardwalk Empire,” and “The Deuce.” He will also be featured in “Bright” alongside Will Smith, which will be released December 22nd, 2017. Episode 7 of “Mindhunter,” in which Anderson guest stars, will be screened for students prior to a Q&A. NYFA Chair of Acting in New York City Peter Stone will be moderating the Q&A.

    “Mindhunter” has recently been renewed by Netflix for a second season which was announced in a tweet by the show’s official account:

    Watch the trailer for season one below: