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  • American Cinematographer Spotlights New York Film Academy Cinematography Grad Egor Povolotskiy

    American Cinematographer magazine, the official publication of the American Society of Cinematographers, recently spotlighted the meteoric rise of New York Film Academy MFA Cinematography grad Egor Povolotskiy in it’s Rising Stars of Cinematography piece.

    In an issue that also features ASC giants like the creative minds behind The Last Jedi, American Cinematographer highlights how Povolotskiy’s pathway to success in Los Angeles was paved in large part through his NYFA connections.

    First, Povolotskiy points to his NYFA instructor and mentor Mike Williamson, and later to fellow NYFA alum and line producer Mariietta Volynska, who hired the cinematographer for his first project post-graduation, based on his NYFA thesis. 

    Since then, Povolotskiy has padded out his already impressive resume with three wins at the Rochester International and Voya Film Festivals plus another four nominations for his short film We Are Enemies.

    Now with eight features and almost 60 short films under his belt, we had a chance to hear from Povolotskiy about his experience working on the riveting thriller, Gold Dust, and his own journey behind the lens.

    NYFA: First, can you tell us a little bit about your journey and what brought you to the New York Film Academy?

    EP: My journey starts back in Russia. I was at university getting my first master’s in artificial intelligence. Somewhere in the middle of my education, I started taking pictures of my friends and becoming interested in photography in general. I realized that AI was not that interesting for me anymore, and I started growing more as a photographer. (I still finished my masters though!)

    During university, I was working as a photojournalist as well as a wedding and family photographer, shooting for Marriott Hotels in Moscow. I was also an official photographer of Russian Association of Motorcyclists. Bikers and their bikes were involved in film productions, and for me it was always magic to see how films were done. So the next time I saw them on set, I called the president of this association and asked him if I could stop by and take some pictures just for myself. It was a shoot of a son of one of the most famous directors in Russia, with the biggest production company. I ended up being hired as bts [behind-the-scenes photographer] after my first day on set.

    After working for three years as bts and 2nd unit, the producer asked me one day if I wanted to DP a film. I refused, and told her that I would first get my education. … I had a sense of framing and lighting, but I didn’t know anything about being a DP at that time. Being a DP is not just framing and lighting. A DP is a storyteller, a head of a department, a set runner and problems solver — that’s became a definition of my job now.

    When I was choosing a school I was really afraid to go overseas, but my wife supported me, saying that everything was going to be how I wanted. My parents also gave me big support. My DP friends recommended NYFA as a possible school — hands-on and not that expensive. I was choosing between London, Lodze (in Poland), and NYFA, and I choose NYFA in the end.

    Egor Povolotskiy via IMDB

    NYFA: Do you have any favorite NYFA moments from your time as a NYFA student?

    EP: As for favorite moments — I really don’t know, because it was great overall. … Every project I was shooting, I was trying to do better and bigger than my previous project. I still have warm feelings about NYFA and mention it where I can. I was also TA-ing sometimes between projects. By the time I graduated, a lot of people at NYFA knew me already. But I was still afraid of what would happen after school, how I was going to find a job. But right at two weeks after my graduation, I booked my first feature film as a DP!

    NYFA: Can you tell us a bit more about your experience shooting Gold Dust?

    EP: That was a fun experience. I went to an interview and I usually talk first, but here I was kind of shocked that the director took the initiative. He ask me, “What’s wrong with you Russians, you shoot so differently?” I really didn’t know what to answer. Later when we became friends he told me that he hired me because of the way I told him that I like to shoot fast. David Wall — a true director, in my understanding of what that means: great powerful leader, a captain of a ship. …

    We were actually blessed to have a desert with its very different looks — breathtaking sunsets, rain, heat — we got everything taped. We got a great “family” film by the end.

    Egor Povolotskiy Cinematography reel summer 2017 from Egor Povolotskiy on Vimeo.

    NYFA: Can you tell us a bit about your prep process before you start working on a film?

    EP: I read the script as the “dumbest person,” meaning that everything should be clear for me. If I have any questions, there’s going to be a person [in the audience] who will ask the same question. Then, myself and the director talk about the story in general. … In most cases I’m able to tell what kind of film the director sees in his mind. I do a beat breakdown of a script, and we decide if the film needs to be stylized or not. Then I build visual arcs based on developing the character and style of the film. Usually I give a couple of options to the director, if he gives me freedom. I prefer collaboration over the projects were I have no creative influence — every film is a part of myself.

    … I remember at NYFA we had some sort of test. If the director wanted a shot, but the producer was not giving him money, which side you will take? There are always two [out of three] things you have to choose: not expensive, good or fast. The secret is you can combine all three, actually!

    Being a collaborator with understanding of storytelling is a great help for a director, if you’re fast. … You have to stay in the budget, and then the producer will always love you. Learning how to use visual tools (composition, lighting, movement, editing, color grading), how to be a leader, how to delegate to your crew and build a shooting process so the crew feel safe, comfortable, respectfully treated — it is huge work.

    Being a DP you’re learning not only about other people, but also about yourself.

    Gold Dust film poster via IMDB

    NYFA: Are you working on any other upcoming projects you’d like to share?

    EP: As for future projects, I’m prepping a film with Richard Friedman (NYFA instructor), a TV series with Cyril Zima, and a mystic feature film with Alex Babaev.

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Egor Povolotskiy for taking the time to share a part of his story with our students.

     

  • The Scapegoat Screens at Dubai International Film Festival & Young Saudi Film Festival

    With award season upon us, we’re always excited to hear from our alumni around the world as they find success screening their work. New York Film Academy (NYFA) BFA Filmmaking graduates Talha (“B.”) Bin Abdulrahman and Maan Bin Abdulrahman have already seen their NYFA thesis film, The Scapegoat, celebrated at the Middle East’s leading film festival, the 14th Dubai International Film Festival. There, it was an official selection. 

    The short was an official selection at the following other festivals:

    • The Irvine International Film Festival
    • Orlando Film Festival
    • San Antonio Film Festival
    • Chandler Film Festival

    The Scapegoat continues its momentum as an official selection at the second annual Young Saudi Film Festival, screening at NYFA Los Angeles Feb. 18.

    Talha B. was able to take some time during his busy festival schedule to tell the NYFA Blog a bit more about his experience directing The Scapegoat.

    NYFA: First, can you tell us a bit about your journey in filmmaking and what brought you to the New York Film Academy?

    TBA: Let me just start this by saying that I feel incredibly fortunate to be a filmmaker. After graduating from high school almost nine years ago, I have gone through several academic paths before I found out that my real passion is filmmaking, which is how I ended up at NYFA — a decision that changed the course of my life, for the better.

    NYFA: Why filmmaking? What inspires you most about the medium?

    TBA: Ever since I was a kid, I was a big fan of watching and talking about films. I believe filmmaking is a format that contains a beautiful package of many different art forms, to tell stories that provoke emotional responses from viewers from all over the world. I always found that inspiring and compelling.

    NYFA: Can you tell us more about your film The Scapegoat? What is the story, and what about the project grabbed you?  

    TBA: The Scapegoat is a 22-minute short I directed as my thesis project for the New York Film Academy’s BFA filmmaking program. The Scapegoat is about Paul Dugan, a former best-selling author who is in search of his next novel. Feeling the pressure to live up to his earlier success, he shelters himself in an isolated cabin in the woods to confront his internal demons.

    Every creative person goes through some [form of] writer’s block, so the story was appealing to me, to represent that visually by telling this story. A creative mind can be its own worst critic, because it is continuously working — especially when there is too much pressure and a lot at stake.

    To not do a project that deals with this topic would be madness.

    NYFA: Were there any surprises or challenges along the way during production, and how did you adapt?

    TBA: I’ve never directed a project that involved a single actor playing multiple roles all at once. In this case it was four distinct characters.

    It was quite the brain teaser to think of all the factors in each scene we shot, from camera blocking to hair and makeup. It required an extra level of planning and coordination between every single person working on set.

    I believe the biggest challenge I faced was when I learned that my actor’s body double refused to shave his facial hair to match the lead actor changing between character looks. Luckily enough, two talented performers stepped in to save the day.

    The critical lesson overall for me was to believe in your crew, because it takes a village to make a film — no matter how big, or small.

    NYFA: Congratulations on screening The Scapegoat at the Dubai International Film Festival! What was this experience like?

    TBA: Thank you, it was a pleasant experience. My producer Maan B. attended on behalf of myself and the team. The film was positively received by the audience, which is something I was delighted to hear.

    NYFA: What advice can you share with our students when it comes to applying to a major festival like the Dubai International Film Fest?  

    TBA: Just one piece of advice that one of my instructors had shared with me, which is to be one of the first people who apply to the festival. Sometimes it’s good to be early, for your film to be noticed.

    NYFA: What is next for The Scapegoat?

    TBA: More festivals will pick it up, hopefully.

    NYFA: What’s next for you? Any upcoming projects you’d like to tell us about?

    TBA: Excited about directing a feature with a working title of The Alien.

    It is a stylized dramedy following the story of an unworldly immigrant who dares to go after his dream as an artist, despite the harsh reality he faces. It will be a collaboration with the same talented writers and producer behind The Scapegoat.

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Talha, Maan and The Scapegoat team on their success! To see The Scapegoat (along with seven other excellent selections) at the Young Saudi Film Festival Sunday, Feb. 18, at 4 p.m., please RSVP here.

     

  • Pete Hammond is Guest Speaker at New York Film Academy Los Angeles

    On Tuesday, Feb. 13, Deadline film critic and reporter, Pete Hammond, joined New York Film Academy (NYFA) students for a Q & A at the Los Angeles campus. NYFA Director of the Q & A Series Tova Laiter hosted the evening.

    Hammond has worked as a contributor for Variety, USA Today, Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times.

    Laiter began the evening by asking Hammond how he got his start in the industry.

    It turns out Hammond didn’t set out to be a journalist. He just knew he wanted to be in the film industry. As an NBC Page, Hammond began working his way up the ladder. From page, he was promoted to a children’s television writer. Soon after, he became a researcher at Entertainment Tonight. From there he moved to the The Arsenio Hall Show, worked on Access Hollywood, and finally, Hammond created the entertainment news program Extra.

    With the Oscars just around the corner, students were curious to know more about the inside politics of the Academy.  One student wanted to know about the possibility of a shake-up at this year’s Oscars. “Looking at the statistics,” he began, “No film has won Best Film without first being nominated for Best Director and Best Screenplay.” Three Billboards hasn’t been nominated for Best Director, but it has been nominated for Best Picture and Best Screenplay. The student wanted to know if Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri could take home the grand prize.   

    Hammond was impressed and jokingly asked the student if he was looking for work. “Your predictions are spot on. This is what I’ve been writing about for the past couple of years.”

    Hammond said that only three times in Oscar’s history has a film won Best Picture that had not been nominated for Best Director. Ben Affleck wasn’t nominated for Argo, though he did win the Director’s Guild Award later that year. Driving Miss Daisy director Bruce Beresford and Grand Hotel director Edmund Goulding were not nominated, either. “The odds are statistically against Three Billboards but I think it has a shot because of the preferential ballot.”

    Hammond explained that when voting for the Oscars, Academy members number all of the nominees from their favorite to their least favorite. That numbering system can have a huge impact on the final turnout. If enough members place Three Billboards as a three or higher, it could mean a win.

    Hammond also noted a new trend over the past five years: Four out of the five Best Picture winners didn’t see their director rewarded, but all of their scripts did win Best Picture. In looking at the history of the Oscars, this trend is very rare.  

    Of course, students also wanted to pick Hammond’s brain about his personal opinion on the 2017 lineup of films. Hammond was particularly impressed with the stamina of Get Out. A film released in February usually isn’t in contention for the Oscars a year after it’s release. In fact, the last Best Picture nominee to have a February release was another thriller film, Silence of the Lambs, in 1991.

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Pete Hammond for taking the time to speak with our students. The Oscars air on Sunday, March 4, 2018, on NBC.  You can read Hammond’s film reviews here.

  • Artist William Wegman is Guest Speaker at New York Film Academy

    The New York Film Academy Guest Speaker Series welcomed acclaimed visual artist William Wegman to the New York Film Academy this month. 

    Speaking to a packed house at the NYFA Theatre at 17 Battery Place, Wegman began by presenting with drawings he made at the beginning of his career. His work has been exhibited internationally since the ‘70s and is part of the permanent collection of numerous museums including the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Hammer Museum, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Centre Pompidou, Paris.

    A pioneering video artist, photographer and painter, Wegman’s Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism is currently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, while his 30-year traveling survey exhibition Being Human opens summer 2018 in Arles. A book of the same title will accompany the opening, published by Thames and Hudson/Chronicle.

    Wegman is best known for the portraits and videos of his Weimaraners, who have collaborated with him in his art making process for many decades. His photos and videos have not only been an art world success, but also a popular success. They have been featured in books, advertisements, TV commercials, and films, from the cover of The New Yorker to Saturday Night Live.

    The New York Film Academy thanks William Wegman for sharing his expertise and insights with our students.

  • New York Film Academy Co-Presents Stranger Than Fiction in its 14th Year at IFC Center

    The New York Film Academy returns to its partnership with IFC Center to present Stranger Than Fiction. For its 2018 winter season, Stranger Than Fiction is hosted by film producer and Toronto International Film Festival documentary programmer Thom Powers, and Oscar-nominated documentarian and New York Film Academy alum Raphaela Neihausen.

    “If you crave documentaries that generate passionate discussion, you’ll get more than your money’s worth from this lineup,” STF Artistic Director Thom Powers said in IFC’s press release.

    Now in its 14th year, Stranger Than Fiction is a weekly documentary film series that will now present nine seminal documentaries in keeping with its tradition of screening cutting-edge documentaries. After each screening, a Q&A will be held with each film’s director or another special guest, providing audiences with a truly exclusive and unforgettable experience. Stranger Than Fiction is sponsored by the New York Film Academy Documentary Filmmaking Department and presented by IFC Center.

    Stranger Than Fiction’s Opening Night festivities will commence with a screening of Sundance smash Seeing Allred, before exploring a lineup that will include serials and a Netflix original, and reflects the dynamically changing, cutting-edge documentary industry.

    Here is this year’s full Stranger Than Fiction lineup, co-presented by the New York Film Academy:

    Feb 6: Seeing Allred (2018, 96 min, dir Roberta Grossman & Sophie Sartain)

    + guest TBA

    Feb 13: Control Room (2004, 84 min)

    + Q&A w/ dir Jehane Noujaim

    Feb 20: This is Congo (2017, 91 min)

    + Q&A w/  dir Daniel McCabe

    Feb 27: Flint Town (2018, two episodes totaling 90 min)

    + Q&A w/ dirs. Zackary Canepari, Jessica Dimmock, Drea Cooper

    March 1: Into the Night: Portraits of Life and Death (2017, 125 min)

    + Q&A w/ dir Helen Whitney

    March 6: Oh, Rick! (2017, 78 min)

    + Q&A w/ dirs Dustin Sussman, Aaron Rosenbloom & subject Rick Crom

    March 13: Wild, Wild Country (2018, two episodes totaling 120 min)

    + Q&A w/ dirs Chapman Way, Maclain Way & exec prod Mark Duplass

    March 20: Occupation: Dreamland (2005, 78 min)

    + Q&A w/ dir Ian Olds

    March 27: Closing Night: The China Hustle (2018, 84 min)

    + Q&A w/ dir Jed Rothstein

    Screenings are held 7 p.m. Tuesdays (& one Thursday) at IFC Center, February 6 – March 27. The general public is welcome to attend Stranger Than Fiction screenings for $17, while IFC Center members enjoy a discounted ticket price of $14. Season Passes are available for $99 ($80 for IFC members), and cover admission to all 9 screenings. For more information, visit Stranger Than Fiction or IFC Center.

  • Watch the Latest Movie Musical Trailers From New York Film Academy

    Since 2011, the New York Film Academy (NYFA) has been leading the movie musical renaissance, with its 2-Year Professional Conservatory of Musical Theatre creating fully-produced original movie musicals as a part of its curriculum. Each NYFA-produced film consists of original music and stories that feature collaborations between NYFA students, faculty, and Broadway professionals, including John Wesley Shipp, Tony winner James Monroe Iglehart (“Landed“) two-time Tony nominee Charlotte d’Amboise, and most recently, Okieriete Onaodowan of “Hamilton” and “The Great Comet.”

    “After touring film festivals internationally and garnering numerous awards, these films have received recognition in The Huffington Post, Variety and other notable media outlets,” says filmmaker Sean Robinson, who produces, edits and oversees the movie musical productions at NYFA. 

    Watch the latest movie musical trailers below, featuring the 2017 NYFA Professional Conservatory of Musical Theatre students. 

    “PLUS ONE” (dir: T.J. Mannix)

    PLUS ONE – trailer from SEAN ROBINSON on Vimeo.

    “FOOD LIKE LOVE” (dir: Johanna Pinzler)

    FOOD LIKE LOVE – trailer from SEAN ROBINSON on Vimeo.

    “readyMA MATER” (dir: Nathan Brewer)

    ALMA MATER – trailer from SEAN ROBINSON on Vimeo.

    “Alma Mater” director Nathan Brewer is currently in post production on his third movie musical, entitled “Hold Your Peace.”

    Upcoming movie musicals include “KAYA: Taste Of Paradise,” directed by Paul Warner, written by Jerome A. Parker, and with music and lyrics by Anna K Jacobs. This ‘70’s disco-era film has already ignited interest from Playbill and Broadwayworld.

    “KAYA,” co-starring “Hamilton” alum Okieriete Onaodowan, provides NYFA’s students with a direct pipeline to working industry professionals, such as costume designer David Withrow, choreographer Michelle Potterf, hair and makeup artist Makayla Benedict, music director Anna Ebbesen, and Nyfa’s own Till Neumann as director of photography. 

    Still from NYFA movie musical “Kaya”

    “You can expect a trailer for ‘Kaya’ this spring” says Robinson. “This film not only showcases exceptional music, storytelling, and directionbut it also celebrates a significant socio-political era in pursuit of civil rights. The gift of song should never be wasted and NYFA is providing an avenue for these students’ voices to be heard.”

    Still from NYFA movie musical “Kaya”

    The New York Film Academy Professional Conservatory of Musical Theatre’s highlight reel can be watched here.

    For more information, release dates and upcoming screenings visit nyfa.edu.

  • New York Film Academy Documentary Film Festival Screens 5 Fantastic Student Docs

    The New York Film Academy recently celebrated The New York Film Academy Documentary Film Festival, offering a showcase of five exceptional thesis documentaries from our conservatory students.

    Held at the NYFA Theatre at the New York City campus, the festival served not only as a thesis presentation, but also a professional launch and celebration of an exceptional group of filmmakers. The surprising, compelling stories and unique visions of the Spring ’17 Documentary Filmmaking Conservatory carried a delighted audience of fellow NYFA students, friends, faculty, and staff around the globe and through a series of remarkable worlds you’d never have known existed.

    Screened at the festival were the following films:

    "Jatar" by Braulio Jatar

    “Running Out of Freedom” Directed by Braulio Jatar

    Braulio Jatar’s father, a high-profile Venezuelan dissident, is dying in prison. But the capture order on Braulio’s head makes returning to the country extremely dangerous. His family won’t allow it. But with his father’s life in the balance, and the Resistance gathering to make one last stand, the young journalist has decided to risk his life to fight for his father and for his country.

    “Cricket Liu” Directed by Julia Cheng

    An aging master of the ancient culture of cricket fighting now uses the art to entertain an endless river of tourists, earning all he possibly can, to send in precious red envelops as gifts to the beloved little grandson he is not allowed to know.

    “Gold Flakes” Directed by Santiago Machado

    A courageous father navigates Colombian rainforests, gleaning the last flakes of El Dorado’s gold.

    But it’s drying up. The abandoned mines threaten collapse, a guerilla army is taking over the area, and the government is trying to starve out the gleaners with new taxes and tightening regulations. Still, his family will eat tonight if he can find just one good gold flake.

    “The Future is Rotten” Directed by Nancy Dionne 

    Forests of the Pacific Northwest hold a rare treasure. A secret culture of foragers spend their lives hunting it. Its coveted flavor can bring up to $1000 per kg. But the Matsutake mushroom’s true genius is as a healer of ruined landscapes, and it may offer the best hope for an American forest system run amuk.

    “Sword Swallower” Directed by Katerina Olkhovaya 

    Notorious circus artist Magnificent Jewels makes a career of death-defying performances. Even outside the limelight, the vulnerable if hardened sword swallower sacrifices all for the burlesque circus that from Berlin, to Brussels, to Paris must always go on.

    Congratulations to our Spring ’17 Documentary Filmmaking Conservatory class! It was truly a proud and triumphant night for our documentary community.

  • New York Film Academy Alum Hired by CBS News and Trained by Fellow Alum

    This week, 2017 NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduate Lara Gato began work as an Associate Producer at CBS News. To add to what is already a proud moment for her alma mater, Gato is being trained by 2015 NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss.

    Lara Gato  came to the New York Film Academy from her home in Madrid, Spain, to pursue her dream to become a journalist. Her fantastic work was recently featured on the NYFA Blog as a standout example of a professional reel.

    NYFA Alumna and CBS News Associate Producer Lara Gato

    “The reel doesn’t get you the job,” NYFA Chair of Broadcast Journalism Bill Einreinhoffer explained to the NYFA Blog. “The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.”

    Nour Idriss, who is training Gato at CBS News, moved to New York City from her home in Aleppo, Syria. It was while still completing her program at NYFA that Nour was encouraged by a NYFA guest speaker to apply for work at CBS News. She used a story she did as a NYFA student to help secure a role. She works both in the production team for “The CBS Evening News Weekend Edition” and as a freelance associate producer for video at CBS.com.

    With “The CBS Evening News,” Idriss told the NYFA Blog she produces and edits VO’s, teases, and packages, overseeing headlines and assisting with gathering research and material. On the digital side at CBS.com, she During the uses a suite of software to publish web content.

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Lara Gato and Nour Idriss for their success and looks forward to hearing more from them at CBS News.

  • A Review of New York Film Academy’s 2017

    As 2018 approaches we take a look back at New York Film Academy’s 2017 and the achievements that made it another stellar year. Here are NYFA 2017 highlights:

     

    NYFA 2017 Year in Review Infographic

    list of guest speakers at nyfa

    nyfa alumni success stories

    nyfa achievements in 2017

    December 30, 2017 • Infographics • Views: 287

  • New York Film Academy Gold Coast Holds September Acting for Film Mid Year Showcase

    In December 2017, the New York Film Academy Australia held the September 2017 Acting for Film student’s mid year performance showcase at its Gold Coast campus in bustling Southport.

    Featuring the work of the September 2017 cohort of Acting for Film candidates, the performance was entitled, “That American Vibe.” Senior Acting Lecturer Mr. Rob Horton directed the event. The performance was held at the Southport Campus Creative Space, an intimate setting where the audience were close enough to feel like it was a part of the the outstanding performances.

    “This showcase included some of the most famous scenes from popular American movies and TV series that influenced a generation of performing artists,” said the event’s director, Rob Horton. “Interpreting them in our own unique ways, there are some strong and memorable moments in this production we called ‘That American Vibe.’ For some of our diploma actors, this is their first time to create and perform on stage in front of a life audience. Bravo to every single one of them!”

    “That American Vibe” exhibited the versatile range of this group of diverse acting students. The New York Film Academy Australia would like to congratulate it’s September 2017 Acting for Film cohort on their wonderful work!