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  • Here’s What Happened at The 89th Academy Awards

    The New York Film Academy followed the 89th Academy Awards ever so closely last night on social media, even through the confusion. Heading into the evening, NYFA was firmly rooting for two of its alumni, Jean de Meuron and Raphaela Neihausen, both having been involved with nominated short films. Neihausen’s short documentary film, “Joe’s Violin,” which she produced, was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short. Alumnus Jean de Meuron was executive producer on “La femme et le TGV,” which was up for Best Live Action Short. While the former students didn’t end up winning for their respective categories, their monumental achievement speaks for itself.

    oscars nyfa alumni

    Of course the most talked about moment from last night’s awards event, hosted by Jimmy Kimmel, was the “Steve Harvey-like” gaffe during the Best Picture announcement. After accidentally awarding Best Picture to the movie musical, “La La Land,” the actual winner was revealed to be “Moonlight,” which iconic actor and director, Warren Beatty, clearly rectified by pointing out the winning card that was supposed to have been read.

    So while that was not exactly a shining moment for the gracious team behind “La La Land,” the film still notched a record-tying 14 nominations. “Moonlight” and “Arrival” followed with a very respectable eight wins each. It should also be worth nothing that two of our teacher’s assistants from New York Film Academy South Beach, Robert Colom and Danniel Rodriguez, had the privilege of working on set of “Moonlight” as Production Assistants.

    One of the more controversial topics of last year’s awards was the fact that there were no people of color nominated for an Oscar. However, this year offered the most diverse list of nominees, with a total of seven actors of color nominated — six black and one Indian. Some of the winners included Best Supporting Actor Mahershala Ali from “Moonlight,” and Best Supporting Actress Viola Davis from “Fences.”

    NYFA also recognized a few of its former guest speakers like Kenneth Lonergan, who won Best Original Screenplay for his work on “Manchester by the Sea,” and Linus Sandgren, who won Best Cinematography for his capturing of “La La Land.”

    Additionally, in the world of animation, “Zootopia” won Best Animated Feature Film. Last year, before the film’s release, 3D Animation students at NYFA had an inside look from “Zootopia” animator, Darrin Butters, who broke down scenes and the development process that went into the Disney film.

    seth rogen

    Finally, on a humorous note, NYFA guest speaker Seth Rogen brought us back to the future after emerging from a DeLorean with Michael J. Fox. Mr. Rogen was at NYFA Los Angeles last year to screen his R-rated animated comedy, “Sausage Party,” which was an absolute blast for those students and alumni fortunate enough to attend.

    While the snafu at the end of the evening will be talked about for days to follow, the winners will always remember when they received Hollywood’s most coveted prize.

    Below is a complete list of the 89th Academy Award nominees — winners are in bold:

    BEST PICTURE

    “Arrival”

    “Fences”

    “Hacksaw Ridge”

    “Hell or High Water”

    “Hidden Figures”

    “La La Land”

    “Lion”

    “Manchester by the Sea”

    “Moonlight” (WINNER)

     

    ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE

    Casey Affleck in “Manchester by the Sea” (WINNER)

    Andrew Garfield in “Hacksaw Ridge”

    Ryan Gosling in “La La Land”

    Viggo Mortensen in “Captain Fantastic”

    Denzel Washington in “Fences”

     

    ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Jeff Bridges in “Hell or High Water”

    Mahershala Ali in “Moonlight” (WINNER)

    Lucas Hedges in “Manchester by the Sea”

    Dev Patel in “Lion”

    Michael Shannon in “Nocturnal Animals”

     

    ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE

    Isabelle Huppert in “Elle”

    Ruth Negga in “Loving”

    Natalie Portman in “Jackie”

    Emma Stone in “La La Land” (WINNER)

    Meryl Streep in “Florence Foster Jenkins”

     

    ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

    Nicole Kidman in “Lion”

    Viola Davis in “Fences”

    Naomie Harris in “Moonlight”

    Octavia Spencer in “Hidden Figures”

    Michelle Williams in “Manchester by the Sea”

     

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    “Kubo and the Two Strings”

    “Moana”

    “My Life as a Zucchini”

    “The Red Turtle”

    “Zootopia” (WINNER)

     

    CINEMATOGRAPHY

    “Arrival”

    “La La Land” (WINNER)

    “Lion”

    “Moonlight”

    “Silence”

     

    COSTUME DESIGN

    “Allied”

    “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” (WINNER)

    “Florence Foster Jenkins”

    “Jackie”

    “La La Land”

    “Fantastic

     

    DIRECTING

    “Arrival” – Denis Villeneuve

    “Hacksaw Ridge” – Mel Gibson

    “La La Land” – Damien Chazelle (WINNER)

    “Manchester by the Sea” – Kenneth Lonergan

    “Moonlight” – Barry Jenkins

     

    DOCUMENTARY (FEATURE)

    “Fire at Sea”

    “I Am Not Your Negro”

    “Life, Animated”

    “O.J.: Made in America” (WINNER)

    “13th”

     

    DOCUMENTARY (SHORT SUBJECT)

    “Extremis”

    “4.1 Miles”

    “Joe’s Violin”

    “Watani: My Homeland”

    “The White Helmets” (WINNER)

     

    FILM EDITING

    “Arrival”

    “Hacksaw Ridge” (WINNER)

    “Hell or High Water”

    “La La Land”

    “Moonlight”

     

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    “Land of Mine”

    “A Man Called Ove”

    “The Salesman” (WINNER)

    “Tanna”

    “Toni Erdmann”

     

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

    “A Man Called Ove”

    “Star Trek Beyond”

    “Suicide Squad” (WINNER)

     

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

    “Jackie”

    “La La Land” (WINNER)

    “Lion”

    “Moonlight”

    “Passengers”

     

    MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

    “Audition (The Fools Who Dream)” from “La La Land”

    “Can’t Stop The Feeling” from “Trolls”

    “City Of Stars” from “La La Land” (WINNER)

    “The Empty Chair” from “Jim: The James Foley Story”

    “How Far I’ll Go” from “Moana”

     

    PRODUCTION DESIGN

    “Arrival”

    “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them”

    “Hail, Caesar!”

    “La La Land” (WINNER)

    “Passengers”

     

    ANIMATED SHORT FILM

    “Blind Vaysha”

    “Borrowed Time”

    “Pear Cider and Cigarettes”

    “Pearl”

    “Piper” (WINNER)

     

    LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM

    “Ennemis Intérieurs”

    “La Femme et le TGV”

    “Silent Nights”

    “Sing” (WINNER)

    “Timecode”

     

    SOUND EDITING

    “Arrival” (WINNER)

    “Deepwater Horizon”

    “Hacksaw Ridge”

    “La La Land”

    “Sully”

     

    SOUND MIXING

    “Arrival”

    “Hacksaw Ridge” (WINNER)

    “La La Land”

    “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”

    “13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi”

     

    VISUAL EFFECTS

    “Deepwater Horizon”

    “Doctor Strange”

    “The Jungle Book” (WINNER)

    “Kubo and the Two Strings”

    “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story”

     

    WRITING (ADAPTED SCREENPLAY)

    “Arrival”

    “Fences

    “Hidden Figures”

    “Lion”

    “Moonlight” (WINNER)

     

    WRITING (ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY)

    “Hell or High Water”

    “La La Land”

    “The Lobster”

    “Manchester by the Sea” (WINNER)

    “20th Century Women”

     

     

    February 27, 2017 • Community Highlights, Entertainment News • Views: 2654

  • NYFA Australia Sydney’s Ben Osmo Wins Oscar for Best Sound Mixing

    ben osmo

    Coming in with a “technical” knockout in last night’s 88th Academy Awards was Mad Max: Fury Road, winning six behind-the-scenes Oscars. The groundbreaking visuals and sound from the production paved the way for its momentous evening, which included New York Film Academy Australia, Sydney Instructor Ben Osmo, who won an Oscar for Best Sound Mixing.

    ben osmo

    The acclaimed film, shot in both Namibia and parts of Australia, is about a woman who rebels against a tyrannical ruler in post-apocalyptic Australia in search for her home-land with the help of a group of female prisoners, a psychotic worshipper, and a drifter named Max. Director George Miller put together quite an impressive cast and crew in this critically and financially successful sci-fi adventure.

    Passing on that successful production experience to our students will be none other than Instructor Osmo, who teaches hands-on production and sound workshops, which take our students out of the classroom and directly onto a real set environment.

    ben osmo

    We’re so proud of Mr. Osmo and would like to congratulate him on his Oscar win!

    February 29, 2016 • Community Highlights, Entertainment Australia, Filmmaking • Views: 6911

  • Julie Pacino Producing Mary Pickford Biopic


    Mary Pickford is finally getting the Hollywood treatment from the Hollywood she helped to create. Pickford, the curly-haired ingénue considered cinema’s first “America’s Sweetheart” was a huge star in the silent era and early days of Hollywood.

    Pickford wasn’t just one of the first starlets of the silver screen—she was also a powerful force behind the camera. During her career, she co-founded two significant institutions. The first, with Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith and her husband Douglas Fairbanks, was United Artists, a studio controlled by actors and filmmakers in an attempt to wrest power from the major studios. UA continues as a major producer to this day as part of MGM.

    Pickford’s other contribution was even greater—she was one of the original 36 co-founders of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences, the organizations of cinema’s professionals in all fields and provider of the annual Oscars. Pickford won two Academy Awards herself, a Best Actress Oscar for 1929’s Coquette and an honorary lifetime achievement Oscar in 1976.

    It’s no surprise then that her fascinating life is being made into a film, adapted from Eileen Whitfield’s biography Pickford: The Woman Who Made Hollywood. The movie is being scripted by Josh Fagin and directed by Jennifer DeLia. DeLia is producing the film with Julie Pacino, a New York Film Academy graduate who co-founded Poverty Row Entertainment with DeLia. The two also collaborated on Billy Bates, the haunting look at a tortured artist. Pacino, the daughter of Al Pacino, is the perfect choice to tell the story of a Hollywood legend.

    March 12, 2015 • Entertainment News, Filmmaking, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 5259

  • Independent Spirit Awards Liked ‘Birdman’ Too

    birdman

    The big story about this year’s Oscars winners may very well be what else they’ve won—namely, the Independent Spirit Awards. The ceremony, as usual, was held the day before the Academy Awards, and rewarded films with smaller budgets and not supported by Hollywood’s largest studios. The show typically has a looser, more fun vibe where its celebrities mingle and goof off, similar to the Golden Globes. This year’s show was hosted by Fred Armisen and Kristen Bell.

    Like the Academy Awards, Birdman walked away with Best Feature. However, in one of the biggest differences from the Oscars, Richard Linklater was awarded Best Director for Boyhood. Julianne Moore, Patricia Arquette, and J.K. Simmons all foreshadowed their Oscar wins with acting awards, though Michael Keaton scored the win he couldn’t get Sunday for his starring role in Birdman. Citizenfour presaged its Best Documentary Oscar with a Spirit Award win in the same category. Even the Best Cinematography and Best Editing awards mirrored the Oscars, going to Birdman and Whiplash, respectively. Best Foreign Film winner Ida also got its Spirit Award equivalent for Best International Film.

    With nearly every major winner of the Spirit Awards going on to win their categories at the Academy Awards this weekend, the Oscars overwhelmingly went to films not directly produced or financed by the major studios. Is this a sign of the times, a decentralization of film’s powerhouse auteurs, or just a fluke? Evidence seems to point to the former—after all, five years ago Spirit winner The Hurt Locker beat out Avatar for the Best Picture, but only time will tell. Basically, let’s start the 2016 Oscar predictions!

    Here’s a full list of the winners:

    BEST FEATURE

    Birdman
 Producers: Alejandro G. Iñárritu, John Lesher, Arnon Milchan, James W. Skotchdopole

    BEST MALE LEAD

    Michael Keaton, Birdman

    BEST FEMALE LEAD

    Julianne Moore, Still Alice

    BEST DIRECTOR

    Richard Linklater, Boyhood

    BEST SUPPORTING FEMALE

    Patricia Arquette, Boyhood

    BEST SUPPORTING MALE

    J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

    BEST SCREENPLAY

    Dan Gilroy, Nightcrawler

    BEST DOCUMENTARY

    Citizenfour
 Director/Producer: Laura Poitras

    Producers: Mathilde Bonnefoy, Dirk Wilutzky

    BEST INTERNATIONAL FILM

    Ida (Poland), Director: Pawel Pawlikowski

    BEST FIRST FEATURE

    Nightcrawler
 Director: Dan Gilroy; Producers: Jennifer Fox, Tony Gilroy, Jake Gyllenhaal, David Lancaster, Michel Litvak

    BEST FIRST SCREENPLAY

    Justin Simien, Dear White People

    BEST EDITING

    Tom Cross, Whiplash

    BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

    Emmanuel Lubezki, Birdman

    JOHN CASSAVETES AWARD

    Land Ho!

    Writers/Directors: Aaron Katz & Martha Stephens; Producers: Christina Jennings, Mynette Louie, Sara Murphy

    LENSCRAFTERS TRUER THAN FICTION AWARD
  The Kill Team, Director: Dan Krauss

    PIAGET PRODUCERS AWARD
 Chris Chison

    KIEHL’S SOMEONE TO WATCH AWARD
 H., Directors: Rania Attieh & Daniel Garcia

    February 23, 2015 • Entertainment News • Views: 2849

  • Oscar Nominated ‘Foxcatcher’ Screenwriters E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman Inspire NYFA Students

    foxcatcher screenwriters

    Tova Laiter with screenwriters E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman

    This past Tuesday, February 17th New York Film Academy Los Angeles students were admitted into a special screening of Foxcatcher — nominated for 5 Oscars, (starring Steve Carell, Channing Tatum, and Mark Ruffalo) and participated in a Q&A with screenwriters E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman who received a nomination in the upcoming Academy Awards for Best Original Screenplay. E. Max Frye won an Edgar Award from WGA for his first screenplay, Something Wild, directed by Jonathan Demme. As a writer on HBO’s Band of Brothers, he received a Christopher Award, a Peabody Award and was nominated for an Emmy.

    Dan Futterman was nominated for a 2005 Academy Award, a BAFTA Film Award, as well as a Writers Guild of America Award for his screenplay for the film Capote. He also won an Independent Spirit Award and shared the USC Scripter Award with Capote biographer Gerald Clarke. Dan and his wife and frequent writing partner, Anya Epstein, were show runners for the third season of the HBO series In Treatment and are currently writing and producing a new series for Fox TV, Gracepoint. As an actor, Dan has appeared on Broadway’s Angels in America and Off-Broadway, at Lincoln Center and Manhattan Theatre Club. His film acting credits include A Mighty Heart, The Birdcage, Urbania, and the upcoming Kill the Messenger. The Q&A was moderated by producer Tova Laiter.

    E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman gave invaluable advice to aspiring screenwriters and storytellers in general. Shedding light on his writing process E. Max Frye explained that he scribbles down his original drafts as quickly as possible on a legal pad. This allows him to get the story in his mind on paper in the most uncensored way possible. He doesn’t do a traditional plot outline, but rather starts from the concept of character and expands from there. He emphasized the importance of rewriting and never showing anyone of consequence the script until it is in it’s absolute final form. The reason for this is that there is no one in the industry that will read a script twice, so you have one shot only to impress.

    In contrast to E. Max Frye, Dan Futterman talked how he likes to structure like crazy. The process of writing Foxcatcher took six years and the breadth of his notes over the course of that time was “insane.” It was a particularly meticulous process working with a director such as Bennett Miller for whom this screenplay was written. Bennett is not a writer himself, so Dan would have to glean what Mr. Miller wanted from the trial and error process of providing ideas and talking about what does and doesn’t work.

    The information E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman provided to NYFA students, many of which were in the screenwriting program, was incredibly beneficial. We sincerely thank Max and Dan and wish them the best of luck at the upcoming Oscars!

    Foxcatcher will be available on Blu-ray, DVD & Digital HD on March 3rd from Sony Pictures Home Entertainment complete with deleted scenes and an all-new featurette: The Story of Foxcatcher. Click the links below to pre-order.
    iTuneshttp://sonypictur.es/hUmkX9

    February 23, 2015 • Guest Speakers, Screenwriting, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 4331

  • This Year’s Golden Globes Points to Likely Oscar Winners

    tina fey and poehler

    Photo: Paul Drinkwater, AP

    With last night’s 72nd annual Golden Globes taking place in Los Angeles, the ceremony continued to cement its reputation as the best indicator of who will likely be taking the top awards at this year’s Academy Awards. And while co-hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler—hosting the awards for their third and final time—offered plenty of laughs and well-meaning digs, the winners of the night gave the best insight on how this awards season will likely play out.

    To that effect, Boyhood continued to clean up the awards circuit, nabbing the Best Picture, Drama award along with a Best Supporting Actress award for front-runner Patricia Arquette and the Best Director award for Richard Linklater. While Ava DuVernay is still widely believed to be receiving a nomination for Best Director on Thursday when the Academy Award nominees are announced, making her the first African-American woman to ever receive the honor, last night’s win for Linklater seems to indicate that it is his category to lose. However, with The Grand Hotel Budapest picking up the Best Picture, Comedy or Musical category, this dark horse seems more likely than ever to earn a few nominations on Thursday and add some intrigue to an increasingly predictable awards season.

    While Boyhood was widely believed to be a lock for those three awards, the other likely Oscar front runners also got their due last night with Julianne Moore winning the award for Best Actress, Drama for her turn in Still Alice while Michael Keaton picked up his award for Best Actor, Musical or Comedy. However, as the Globes breaks up the best picture and actor categories into Drama and Musical or Comedy, both Keaton’s and Moore’s main competitors also walked away with awards, with Amy Adams winning for Big Eyes and Eddie Redmayne picking up a Best Actor, Drama for his turn as Stephen Hawking in The Theory of Everything. However, both the Best Actor and Actress categories remain highly competitive with actors like Jennifer Anniston, Reese Witherspoon, Jake Gyllenhall, and David Oyelowo making these categories the least predictable.

    The same cannot be said of the Best Supporting Actor category, with JK Simmons accepting the award for his terrifying turn in Whiplash. Simply put, at this point it seems hard to imagine any actors other than Arquette and Simmons cleaning up the Supporting categories when the Oscars air on February 22nd.

    What did you think of last night’s telecast and who would you like to see walking away with nominations on Thursday? What films do you think might end up giving Boyhood a run for its money?

    A full list of last night’s winners can be viewed here.

    January 12, 2015 • Entertainment News • Views: 3311

  • NYFA Documentary Alumni Highlights

    Muhammad Hamdy NYFA The Square

    The Academy Award nomination of Director of Photography and Co-Producer Muhammed Hamdy’s (’12) The Square is just the tip of the iceberg of Documentary Dept. Alumni success stories.

    Two more noteworthy graduates are giving back to their alma mater by investigating how their fellow alumni are making use of their New York Film Academy educations. So far, the resulting online series by award-winning Producer/Director, Maria Stanisheva (’12) and globetrotting Cinematographer, Marco Vitale (’11) features stories about Louis Mole (ʼ12), who produced and shot the television series, “Serial Swindlers,” a year after graduating; Todd Leatherman (ʼ12) who worked on two of this yearʼs Sundance selections; Susanne Dollnig (ʼ12) of Austria, who was promoted to Editor at The House of Trim only seven months after graduating and Louisa Merino (ʼ11) currently Senior Editor and Director at David Lynch Foundation.

    Note: By clicking on the students’ names above you can watch short interview pieces (like the one below) created by Maria Stanisheva.

    February 4, 2014 • Documentary Filmmaking • Views: 3119

  • Recent NYFA Guest Gaby Tana’s ‘Philomena’ Nominated for Best Picture

    Gaby Tana

    Gaby Tana

    The New York Film Academy Producing Department congratulates Industry Speaker Gaby Tana on her Academy Award nomination for Best Picture, Philomena. Besides four Oscar nominations for this film, Gaby’s other film in current release, The Invisible Woman, also received an Academy Award nomination (Best Costume Design).

    Gaby recently spent an evening with our students discussing all aspects of the producing process. Congrats and good luck, Gaby Tana!

    January 31, 2014 • Producing • Views: 3078

  • And the Oscar Nominees are…

    86th oscars

    We all dream of someday having our own Oscar nominations, but for now let’s see which talented artists and films were nominated for this year’s 86th Annual Academy Awards…

    Best Motion Picture of the Year
    Nominees:

    • American Hustle (2013)
    • Captain Phillips (2013)
    • Dallas Buyers Club (2013)
    • Gravity (2013)
    • Her (2013)
    • Nebraska (2013)
    • Philomena (2013)
    • 12 Years a Slave (2013)
    • The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)

    Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role
    Nominees:

    • Christian Bale for American Hustle (2013)
    • Bruce Dern for Nebraska (2013)
    • Leonardo DiCaprio for The Wolf of Wall Street (2013)
    • Chiwetel Ejiofor for 12 Years a Slave (2013)
    • Matthew McConaughey for Dallas Buyers Club (2013)

    Continue Reading

    January 16, 2014 • Academic Programs • Views: 3196

  • Gender Inequality in Film

    In light of the record-breaking opening of the female-led action film Hunger Games: Catching Fire this past weekend, the New York Film Academy decided to take a closer look at women in film and what, if any, advancements women are making. After reviewing the data, it is clear that Hollywood remains stuck in its gender bias. Of course, it’s not all disparaging news and there are a number of female filmmakers, characters, and emerging talent challenging the status quo. In addition, in the independent sphere, women made up roughly half of the directors at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, yet still struggle when it comes to films receiving a wide release. By shedding light on gender inequality in film, we hope to start a discussion about what can be done to increase women’s exposure and power in big-budget films.

    New York Film Academy's Gender Inequality in Film Infographic

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    November 25, 2013 • Infographics • Views: 326339