Adam Moore
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  • Associate Chair Adam Moore’s ‘The Pinkertons’ Attaches Angus Macfadyen

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    angus macfadyen

    Angus Macfadyen in Braveheart

    Some great news coming out of of New York Film Academy Los Angeles campus as Associate Chair of Screenwriting, Adam Moore’s series The Pinkertons, which he co-created with Kevin Abrams and wrote the pilot for, has just attached Turn co-star Angus Macfadyen to play one of the leading roles. The show is currently in pre-production in Canada and set to premiere this fall in first-run syndication in the U.S. The series has been cleared in more than 85% of the country by Rohrs Media Group on station groups including Tribune, Weigel, Hearst, LIN, Meredith, Cox and the CW PLUS.

    The 22-episode action-adventure detective series draws on the real cases of Pinkerton Detective Agency. The series follows founder Allan Pinkerton (Macfadyen), his son, William, and America’s first female detective, Kate Warne, as they solve crimes throughout the 1860s “Wild West”. Interestingly enough, Pinkerton is known for revolutionizing detective work through his development of surveillance, undercover work and the mug shot).

    Moore and Abrams also serve as executive producers and writers, alongside Canadian showrunners and executive producers Larry Lalonde and Phil Bedard (Murdoch Mysteries). Amuse Group USA – a subsidiary of a Japanese entertainment company Amuse Inc. – is also co-financing the project. Zodiak Rights, the international distribution arm of Zodiak Media, will handle international distribution.

    Congrats to Adam Moore for bringing his vision to the screen and we’re all looking forward to watching The Pinkertons this fall!

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    July 25, 2014 • Acting, Community Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 4678

  • NYFA MFA Screenwriting Alum Sells Thesis Pilot Script to ABC

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    In their second year of study, students in New York Film Academy’s MFA Screenwriting program choose to write either a feature film or a television pilot for their thesis project. While every student hopes to launch their career with a great writing sample, recent graduate Angela Ruhinda (Jan 2011 Screenwriting) took it one step further. Last week, Angela’s thesis pilot, Iman & Andy, sold to ABC with Whoopi Goldberg and Ben Silverman attached as producers.

    Angela Ruhinda

    Angela Ruhinda

    The sitcom is about an interracial couple who are forced to team up on a relationship advice vlog, with their whole office and millions of viewers following their relationship.

    NYFA Associate Screenwriting Chair, Adam Moore caught up with Angela, who is back home in her native Tanzania at the moment, to ask her about the experience.

    Where did the idea for ‘Iman & Andy’ come from?

    Iman & Andy was an idea I came up with during my second and final year at NYFA. I chose the TV option for my thesis because I’ve always wanted to create my own sitcom. I love romantic comedies but it’s not very often that you see a really good one on television anymore. I wanted a really fun couple that people could relate to. I was a big fan of the show ‘Dharma & Greg’ and love the Yin and Yang dynamic of their relationship. I wanted to update the concept by making them inter-racial and involving social media. The main statement I want to make is that online dating in the social media age is awkward, crazy and stressful no matter what color you are. 

    How did the script get from your thesis workshop to Electus?

    I entered the Storyboard TV screenwriting contest in October 2012 and became a finalist by January 2013. I lost the competition by just a few votes but Amanda Krentzman, one of the judges on the panel who happens to work at Electus Productions, loved my script so much she contacted me after the contest was over and expressed interest in selling it to a major network. 

    Did the script change from your thesis draft to the one that eventually sold?

    I sat down with Electus…and I just talked to them about season arcs and characters. They already understood the concept. Pitch workshop [part of Business of Screenwriting 3, a second-year screenwriting course taught by Adam Moore] did help me with my nerves in the room. I was able to speak clearly about my ideas and charm the crap out of them. Electus gave me a few notes on characters and one or two scenes before we decided to send out the script to networks. Thankfully, I only did two re-writes and ABC liked the concept and script enough to buy it as soon as they read it. 

    What’s one piece of advice you’d give to current students?

    Don’t knock screenwriting competitions! They can change your life and kickstart your career!

    How excited are you right now?

    They haven’t created a word yet that describes how I’m feeling!

    Well, there is a word for how we at NYFA are feeling – PROUD. Speaking about their former student, Thesis Advisor Jerry Shandy and Thesis Instructor Eric Nelson had this to say:

    We’re proud of Angela because she worked really hard on this pilot in the Thesis Workshop class. With her workshop mates’ support, she continued to develop her idea, writing and rewriting until it was singing. That’s what we strive to do in screenwriting workshop classes here at NYFA: take a good idea and refine it until it’s a piece of material the writer is proud to take out into the world.

    Congratulations, Angela!

    -Adam Moore

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    December 5, 2013 • #WomenOfNYFA, Diversity, Screenwriting, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 5979

  • New York Film Academy Instructor Writes DiRT 3 Video Game for Xbox and Playstation

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    NYFA Instructor Adam Moore

    NYFA Instructor Adam Moore 

    New York Film Academy instructor Adam Moore recently wrote video game DiRT 3, an auto racing game released last month for Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. The game has been receiving great reviews for gameplay and presentation, including a 9.2 from GameTrailers and an Editor’s Choice award from IGN. Adam comments, “If you’re into off-road, this game will really blow your hair back.” Adam was responsible for creating the NPC’s (non-player characters), which help the story arc and create a narrative for the game. Adam discusses the transition from writing screenplays to video games and how a future gamer can get started in New York Film Academy’s programs in Game Design and Screenwriting:

    Dirt 3

    Adam, how did you first get involved in production of a video game?

    The developer of the game is a London-based company called Codemasters.  For the third installment of their hit off-road racing franchise (DiRT), they wanted to bring an authentic American voice to the game.  They called my game writing agent and asked for a writing sample.  I think my writing partner (Kevin Abrams) and I were the ones selected because we had previously developed an off-road racing reality series, and so we knew the lingo and the world really well.  As for my role in the game’s creation, it was up to me to create the NPCs (non-player characters), define their voices and their relationship with the player character.

    How did your background in screenwriting translate to writing a video game?

    I’ve actually answered this question for my students many times.  ”Writing is writing.”  The craft you learn in your screenwriting workshops translates to any medium you want to work in — movies, tv, comics, video games, you name it.

    What is the biggest challenge in writing for video games?

    The biggest challenge in writing for video games is the fact that you are usually the only writer in company full of gamers and programmers.  Oftentimes, the higher-ups are very good at giving notes on code, but not so much at giving notes on story.  Buggy code has a finite solution.  What the higher-ups at a game developer don’t always understand is that storytelling issues don’t always have such finite, simple solutions.

    dirt3

    When writing oDiRT 3, the challenge given to me was to create three life-like Non-Player Characters, who had emotional depth and were compelling, but would only be heard and never seen.  How do you solve this problem?  Well, I’ll go back to the idea that “writing is writing.”  I fell back on my craft to find the solution and it ended up being extremely simple.  DiRT 3 covers four seasons in the career of a rookie driver.  The NPCs are the rookie’s business manager, chief mechanic, and fan consultant.  The arc we selected was four strangers who come together to do something great.  So, in the beginning of the game, the dialogue is a little more formal.  By the time you get to the end of the game, you’ve been through four seasons of racing with these people, and therefore the dialogue is much more casual — you’ve become best friends.  It was a fun challenge.

    How could a gamer get their start at New York Film Academy?

    What’s great about our screenwriting department is that the entire faculty is working writers.  Very good screenwriters trained me, but some of them hadn’t been actively working in the industry for years.  In our program, the students are learning from screenwriters who are in the business.  For example, in my class, Business of Screenwriting, one of the most important things I teach is how to pitch.  Would you rather learn that skill from someone who hasn’t pitched in a decade or someone who was at a studio or a TV network that morning pitching an idea?  As for our game design program, our mantra is “every student is a storyteller.”  Video games are the mass entertainment medium of the 21st century.  They will surpass movies and television, and maybe already have.  Whereas other programs focus on the nuts and bolts of game design, our focus is creating great, narrative driven games.  We believe that the best games are made when design and story are working hand in hand, rather than a handful of cinematics thrown in every now and then.  Like our web site says, “Anyone can teach you how to make a game.  We’ll teach you how to make a great game!”

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    June 27, 2011 • Acting • Views: 2988