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  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) MFA Cinematography Alum Daniela Rodriguez Martinez Racks Up Multiple Awards

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA) Alum Daniela Rodriguez Martinez has kept busy since earning her MFA in Cinematography. With over seven years of experience based in Los Angeles, Martinez has worked on live television, music videos, interviews, documentaries, short films, feature films, and television series, and has picked up multiple awards and nominations along the way.

    Daniela Rodriguez Martinez

    Martinez is originally from Bogota, Colombia and enrolled in NYFA’s MFA in Cinematography program in Fall 2016. While studying at our Los Angeles campus, Martinez was able to work hands-on with advanced professional filmmaking gear used by the industry under the tutelage of Tony Richmond, BSC, ASC—director of photography of films including The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Sandlot, Legally Blonde, and Don’t Look Now.

    “My time at the New York Film Academy gave me the concepts, knowledge, and network to start working in the industry,” Martinez tells NYFA. “I am very grateful to have been able to study there.”

    Daniela Rodriguez Martinez

    Martinez’s films have been shown both domestically and around the world, including Nigeria. She has had the opportunity to work with several high profile actors including Sharon Stone, Marta Kristen, and Simon Miller. Her awards climb into the double digits, including honors from the European Cinematography Awards, Berlin Flash Film Festival, Miami Independent Film Festival, and Los Angeles Independent Film Festival, among many others. Martinez most recently won Best Action Film at the 2019 Festigious International Film Festival in Los Angeles.

    Martinez’s success is all the more notable considering the enormous gender gap in cinematography. Currently, only three percent of directors of photography in Hollywood are women. It wasn’t until last year that a woman was even nominated at the Academy Awards for Cinematography; this year, no women were recognized.

    Daniela Rodriguez Martinez

    I have found that as a woman I must prove to be two or three times more qualified than a man to be considered as a director of photography on a project,” Martinez says. “Nonetheless, so far it has been a quite an adventure and …  I hope to remain a director of photography here in Los Angeles for many years and continue to grow in the industry and contributing to this change that is happening.”

    Currently, Martinez is working on multiple projects, including a television series about vegan food, a web series, and several short films.

    The New York Film Academy congratulates MFA alum Daniela Rodriguez Martinez on her numerous awards and festival appearances and looks forward to following her career in cinematography as it continues to progress!

    Daniela Rodriguez Martinez


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    April 9, 2019 • Acting • Views: 786

  • “Sympathy for the Devil” at 50: New York Film Academy (NYFA) Los Angeles Chair of Cinematography Tony Richmond Presents Restored Godard Film 

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailFifty years ago, Jean-Luc Godard filmed an intimate, groundbreaking documentary about the Rolling Stones, capturing the recording of one of their most seminal tracks: “Sympathy for the Devil.” The 1968 documentary shares the same title, though it was originally titled One Plus One before its producers controversially took final cut away from Godard. sympathy for the devil

    The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) recently held a limited theatrical release for the 50th anniversary of Sympathy for the Devil, which was kicked off with a Q&A with New York Film Academy-Los Angeles (NYFA-LA) Chair of Cinematography Tony Richmond, A.S.C., B.S.C. Richmond served as Godard’s director of photography on the documentary, and supervised the color grading of the newly restored, 4K version of the film.

    The restoration was done in London by Arrow Films, working off the still-preserved original 35mm negative. “It’s just wonderful,” says Richmond of the project, adding it was “such an honor to go back to a film I shot fifty years ago and give it another life.”

    Sympathy for the Devil was one of Richmond’s earliest films as director of photography. He has mostly worked on narrative features since then, including Don’t Look Now, The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Sandlot, and Legally Blonde. The London-born, BAFTA-winning cinematographer has resided as Faculty Chair of NYFA-LA’s cinematography school since 2015, where students receive hands-on training in the unique visual language of film with state-of-the-art equipment they can use on their classmates’ productions. 

    Sympathy was a landmark moment in rock and roll documentaries, preceding other films like Gimme Shelter and The Last Waltz. Along with a strong political message, the film captured the birth of one of the Rolling Stones’ most famous hits. It was also a turbulent shoot, with legendary French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard butting heads with his producers, who changed his original ending. As an infamous story goes, at a screening of the film, Godard attempted to screen his original ending outside in the parking lot, and when one of the producers intervened, he punched him in the face. 

    Additionally, some of the film was shot on the streets guerilla-style, without permits. Some shots included jumping out of Godard’s car to film his wife, Anna, spray-painting walls, roads, and vehicles, and then hopping back in the car and taking off before the police arrived.

    With an incredible story told by the film and another one around the making of it, it was no surprise that MoMA would host a limited release on its 50th anniversary. The Q&A with Tony Richmond was held after the September 13 screening, which Richmond told NYFA was “a great success. I enjoyed the Q&A, telling them how much in awe I was with Jean-Luc Godard and what an honor it was to shoot a film for him at such a young age.”

    In a recent profile by Rolling Stone magazine, Richmond went into further detail about the shoot, describing how they would pre-light for each member of the band before they would stroll into the studio after a late night of recording and maybe some hard partying: “We knew where Mick was gonna be, where Keith was gonna be, where Brian and Charlie were gonna be, and it was lit in such a way that we never had to touch anything between takes or disturb the Stones in any way…

    “And then the guys would come in, and they’d get down to work, and we would shoot. We were very quiet, and we had a very, very small crew — just a guy pushing the dolly, a focus-puller, Jean-Luc and I, and everybody else was way in the background.”

    Speaking with NYFA, Richmond added, “I wouldn’t know what we were going to shoot until [Mick Jagger] arrived on the set. I can’t tell you how exciting and frightening that was.”

    All told, the new 4K restoration and MoMA’s limited release of Sympathy for the Devil went very well, and included both the theatrical and Godard’s original ending. Richmond told Rolling Stone, “I hadn’t seen it again on a large screen until recently. And I have to say, I think it’s really fantastic… You really see how they’re putting the music together.”

    [UPDATE: November 7, 2018: Sympathy for the Devil will also be screened at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles on November 8, 2018.]Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 15, 2018 • Cinematography, Documentary Filmmaking, Faculty Highlights • Views: 1029

  • Anthony Richmond Leads Production Design Practicum at Laurel Canyon Stages

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailThe New York Film Academy (NYFA) has just completed its annual MFA Production Design and Cinematography Practicum, as a three-day production at the Laurel Canyon Stages.

     

    Throughout the practicum, NYFA Instructor Anthony Cook stepped in to offer guidance and support as the students worked through the many problems that can arise on set. Color theory, storytelling, and layout were all discussed throughout the class. Chair of Cinematography Tony Richmond oversaw the production.

    “Production designers work hand in hand with the cinematographers,” Cook said. “Production Design is really another character in the film. It should be as carefully considered as the actors. It’s an unbelievably important component of crafting a good story.”  

    The New York Film Academy had created the Production Design Practicum for Cinematographers largely to help rising producers understand, through hands-on experience, the vital importance and intricacies of production design.

    The three-day shoot took place at the Laurel Canyon Stages. The New York Film Academy has been working with the studio for several years.

    “They’re always friendly and supportive,” said Associate Chair of Cinematography Mike Williamson.

    Students were involved in every aspect of filming.  They raised flats, designed the interior, directed the scene, and filmed the project.

    “They did everything. Right down to picking the sheets on the bed,” Cook said.

    NYFA alumna Natalie Whittle and actor Shamar Sanders were brought in by Cook to act for the student scenes.  Once the set was wrapped, the students were then able to edit the footage.

    The New York Film Academy Practicums are an opportunity for students to hone their skills in a real-world environment, under the conditions of a professional set.

    Cook was proud of his students stating, “The students did a really good job. It was a great experience. They handled themselves just like I would expect them to.”

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank all of the students who participated in this practicum as well as the instructors who made it possible.

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  • Anthony Richmond Holds Crane and Jib Workshop

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmailDuring their third semester, the MFA Cinematography students at New York Film Academy have a full schedule of workshops to keep them busy. With the Master’s Lighting Workshop, the Underwater Camera Workshop and the Alexa Workshop, the students are given an opportunity work with advanced professional tools and learn how to integrate them into a narrative film production.

    anthony richmond

    NYFA Cinematography Chair Anthony Richmond with his students

    In addition to these courses, the week-long Crane & Jib Workshop gives students the opportunity to work with a variety of camera movement systems from a broad range of the top manufacturers including J.L Fisher, Chapman/Leonard, and Service Vision. Cinematography department chair Anthony Richmond, ASC, BSC led the class, introducing the students to a range of practical techniques for using both remote cranes and jib arms to construct powerful, dynamic shots. Richmond pushed the students to develop their operating skills using both the traditional geared head and the remote crane heads that are based on this classic design.

    crane

    For the last day of the workshop, the class put their new set of skills to work on the Crane & Jib Practicum. They used the 45-foot Scorpion Crane, equipped with a Scorpion Remote Head, a RED Epic Dragon digital cinema camera, a Cooke zoom lens and a remote focus and iris system. With the camera flying on the crane throughout the shoot, the class captured a wide variety of moving shots designed to tell the story in a dynamic style.

    By the end of the workshop, the MFA Cinematography students had a greater understanding of how to design visually stunning shots, and how to use professional tools to execute their ideas. As they look forward to next semester, these cinematographers will have a new set of skills to take their films thesis films to the next level.Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    January 7, 2016 • Cinematography, Community Highlights • Views: 3805