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  • Broadcast Journalism Update – March 2021 Edition

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    This month marked ten years since the start of the tragic, still ongoing Syrian civil war. NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss, who comes from Aleppo, found herself stranded in New York City when all flights back home to Syria were canceled. Enrolling in NYFA, she reinvented herself as a multimedia journalist, then found a home at CBS News. Recently she wasn’t just the producer of stories about the past decade, she became part of the story herself.
    She wrote: “I still can’t believe I’m actually doing this! I’m a journalist! And I owe you for this dream I’m living.”
    Thank you for your kind words, Nour. I think countless hours of hard work had a lot to do with it too…
    It is often said that journalism is the first draft of history. NYFA grad Celina Liv Danielsen can certainly attest to that. A producer/reporter for TV2 In Denmark, she was on-the-scene when violence broke out in Washington DC this past January. Needless to say, it wasn’t the story she thought she was going to report, the official announcement of the winner of the 2020 U.S. Presidential Election.
    Livia Fernanda enrolled in NYFA to develop her reporting skills. Up until that point, she had worked strictly as an in-studio weather reporter. Now an on-air reporter with Grupo Jovem Pan in São Paulo, she demonstrated the difference between covering Brazilian Carnival in 2020 and 2021 with two striking photos.
    Staying in Brazil (I know, Brasil), congratulations to NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Beatriz Puente, now producing for CNN Brasil, based in Rio!
    When Eduvie Martin came to NYFA from Nigeria, she had already developed strong on-camera skills. What she felt she lacked were the technical skills essential to success. She has over a decade of experience in communications and reputation management for global brands and start-ups in Europe and Africa. And as this Linkedin posting can attest, she can multitask with the best of them!
    Lorenzo Capezzuoli Ranchi always looks dapper “on-air,” or I guess I should say “in cyberspace.” He is a regular contributor to the Italian digital media app 264 Zoom. He continues to bring to his stories the same unique qualities that served him so well on the projects he produced as a student here at NYFA.
    Elina Mukherjee, who is back home in India, writes: “These days I work at a food/travel/lifestyle channel called Gobble. …venturing into digital content has been a shift from mainstream journalism. But so far I am really enjoying myself.”
    Closer to home, NYFA alum Dr. Nicole Cross continues to do great things at Spectrum News in Texas. She is not only a wonderful news anchor, studio host and field reporter. She is also a powerful role model for young African American women, and other women of color, who might be considering a career in Journalism.
    Emilie Cruz was recently promoted at ViacomCBS to Senior Manager – Editorial/Creative Strategy. If you look at her LinkedIn page, you’ll notice that she chose for her profile picture a still shot taken from one of the stories she did at NYFA. She’s even holding an NYFA News mic!
    Thanks, Emilie!
    As regular readers of the Broadcast Journalism Update know, last Summer Evgenia Vlasova and I co-taught a three-week online workshop for early-career Russian journalists. This past January, we all got together (virtually, of course) to find out how everyone was doing. Each participant had produced a story on the theme: 2020 – Not The Year Anyone Expected.
    Anastasia Dzutstsati’s story examined The Church In The Era of COVID, while Ekaterina Frolova created a global digital experiment, asking people the question 2020: The End or the Beginning? If you have a few minutes to spare, I have posted these stories and others on Vimeo. They are definitely worth screening.
    Stay tuned for NYFA Moscow Journalism Summer School II, taking place this July and August in (hopefully) in Moscow. Support for this innovative enterprise comes from the U.S. Embassy in Moscow.
    Finally, I am proud to announce that my independent feature film, Invisible Love, won several prizes at the Paris International Film Festival including Best Narrative Feature. Here is a link to the trailer. Coming to a digital platform or theater near you (if you live in Vietnam or China) soon. Here in the United States? Probably next year…
    For more information on NYFA’s Broadcast Journalism program, click here.
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  • “Invisible Love” From NYFA Chair Bill Einreinhofer Wins Big at Paris International Film Festival

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    Chair of the Broadcast Journalism department at New York Film Academy, Bill Einreinhofer has a lot to celebrate after his film Invisible Love won three major awards at the Paris International Film Festival in February.

    Bill Einreinhofer on set of “Invisible Love”

    Coming off on its premiere at the Marche du Film, associated with the Cannes International Film Festival, in 2020, Invisible Love has racked up three awards including Best Narrative Feature Film, Best International Actor (Hoang Phuong), and Best International Collaboration. 

    In addition to Einreinhofer executive producing Invisible Love, NYFA’s roots run deep in the film, with Acting for Film alum Kazy Tauginas playing one of the male leads and former NYFA staffer Nancy Hanzhang Shen serving as both a Producer and the 1st AD on a set working in three languages (Vietnamese, Mandarin, and English).

    Hoang Phuong in “Invisible Love”

    Invisible Love takes place during the 1930s during the era of French Indochina and follows the story of one woman’s search for love, and how time and again her dreams are betrayed. “The subtext of the film is the nature of colonialism, and the corrosive effect it has on both the colonizers as well as those colonized,” explained Einreinhofer. “There is plenty of melodrama in this film and enough plot for perhaps three movies. While in North America and Europe Invisible Love is considered an ‘art house’ film, in Vietnam and China it is popular entertainment.”

    Einreinhofer is no stranger to working heavily with international markets and met the film’s director, Guo Xiang, while working on Einreinhofer’s documentary Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began. We found we had a lot in common, even though we are totally different and each doesn’t speak the other’s language,” recalled Einreinhofer. “Director Guo valued my experience in international co-production and distribution while I admired his cinematic vision and resourcefulness. He wanted to bring authenticity to this period film [Invisible Love], and my background in non-fiction video and familiarity with Asian cultures helped to ensure historic elements of the film rang true.”

    Nancy Hanzhang Shen (Left) and Bill Einreinhofer (Right)

    The Broadcast Journalism Chair even makes a cameo appearance in the film as Dr. Sawyer, the director of a Western-run hospital in DaNang, where two of the key characters work. “It [acting] helped me better appreciate the ability of the actors to do the same scene time after time, with no slip-ups in dialogue and always hitting their marks, which I find challenging,” he shared. 

    Einreinhofer also explained that he was able to rely on Tauginas while on set to give him a quick tutorial on the do’s and don’ts of film performance as well as Shen, who served as a producer and 1st AD on the film. “I was also much taken by the sheer beauty of Vietnam, and how welcoming the people there are to Americans. For my generation, Vietnam was a war, not a place.”

    For those who see the film, Einreinhofer hopes that Invisible Love will speak to the notion that, regardless of culture or societal norms, love knows no barriers and surpasses all universal emotions. 

    The film now continues on the festival circuit for the next six months, after which Einreinhofer and the crew hope to sign agreements with distributors to get into the prime markets and platforms for a larger audience to view the film.

    New York Film Academy would like to congratulate Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer on his continued success with Invisible Love and looks forward to announcing when the film is available to view for the public. 

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  • Broadcast Journalism Update – November 2020 Edition

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    2020 has been an eventful year, and even though there are less than two months to go, the pace of events shows no sign of slowing down.

    “Deep in the Heart of Texas” (which is the title of a famous old song… I know a lot about “old songs”), former NYFA student Nicole Cross had a long night that dragged into the early morning (and beyond) as one of the anchors/presenters for Election Night coverage on Spectrum News 1, a 24-hour local news channel available throughout Texas.

    Danish TV producer/reporter Celina Liv Danielsen spent many, many hours in Las Vegas. But not at any of the casinos. Instead, she was at the Clark County Administration Building waiting for the latest vote count.


    Karen Hua
     remembered the first rule of TV reporting… drink water.
    NYFA instructor Evgenia Vlasova has a substantial social media presence. She discovered what it is like for a major network to see your story, and liked it so much they decide they want to do it too… Personally, I think Genia’s version was better!

    Speaking of Genia, she and I co-hosted a two-hour webinar on TV production during the age of COVID. The first hour looked at TV news production, while in the second hour we explored change in the production of talk shows, episodic television, and feature films. The webinar is part of a three-day conference called Astana Media Week, which draws TV producers and executives from throughout Central Asia.

    And, in keeping with NYFA production protocols, we wore our masks.

    Of course, lots of other things happened over the last few months. Broadcast Journalism graduate Federica Polidoro covered the legendary Biennale de Venezia, one of the few international film festivals that actually took place in-person this year.

    In Brazil, NYFA alum Daniella Gemignani celebrated a work anniversary at media giant Globo, in Sao Paulo Brazil.

     

    Paula Varejao, who works on Globo’s Mais Globosat, continues going to places I can only dream of visiting.

    Broadcast Journalism grad Beatriz Puente is working for Band TV. And while she loves her job as a producer, I think she might love being an on-air reporter even more…

    One of her recent stories was how a well-known dance club in Rio opened and violated every COVID-19 rule you could imagine. This is why Journalism is so important. Frankly, there are times when Journalism is literally a matter of life and death.

    Many time zones away, former NYFA student Abiola Jinadu has established her own production company in Nigeria. The company specializes in a wide range of video programming, the same way we train our students to be multimedia journalists capable of working in many different settings. Congratulations, Abiola!

    Closer to New York City, NYFA grad Kendall Bunch made her way to Marquette, Michigan (one of the smaller TV markets in the United States) to start her career. It is a path many of us have taken. Myself, I spent a couple of years in Madison, Wisconsin…

    Broadcast Journalism alum (and U.S. Navy veteran) Clyde D. Gunter is now a Content Strategist at ESPN Original Content.

    And current Broadcast Journalism student (and part-time Good Morning America studio crew member) Brett Mills shows how to maintain social distancing with a Sony FS5 HD/4K camera.

    Stay tuned for more updates from Broadcast students, alumni, and faculty. For more information about our Broadcast Journalism programs, click here.
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  • Broadcast Journalism Update – Back to School Edition (September 2020)

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    Things usually slow down over the course of the Summer. But that wasn’t the case for the NYFA Broadcast Journalism department, or many of our graduates.

    Starting in late July, Evgenia Vlasova and myself co-taught NYFA’s first Moscow Journalism Summer School (JSS). Thanks to support from the U.S. State Department, we were able to offer an intensive three-week course-of-study to early career Russian journalists along with a number of current university students.
    It was a real challenge, seeing as we had to conduct the entire workshop online with participants spread out over seven time zones. While classes started for Genia and me at 7:00 AM in New York, it was 2:00 PM for students in Moscow and 6:00 PM in Siberia. (The Siberian students regularly finished classwork after midnight!)

    The stories the workshop participants created were nothing short of spectacular, covering a wide range contemporary topics. And no two were the same. Everyone approached their topic with their own personal style.
    NYFA alum George Colli, who many of you know from the NYFA website, lent his experience and perspective as well. He spoke from the point of view of someone who knows what it takes to create compelling TV news stories under tight deadlines. (And now he has a beard! A look many of you reading this know I always find fashionable…)
    Other grads graciously agreed to “drop in” on our Zoom sessions as guest speakers. Among them was Karen Hua, who “called in” while covering an out-of-control wildfire in Southern California for KGET in Bakersfield.

    Starla Sampaco is a news anchor at KCTS, the PBS station in Seattle as well as an entrepreneur building her own digital platform.

    And Gillian Kemmerer, who has firsthand experience working in Russia covering sports, business, and the business of sports.
    Other NYFA Broadcast Journalism grads have been busy too. Isabella Faria is now a reporter at CNN Brasil. She came to New York to learn to shoot and edit, used those skills to get a job in the video department of Brazil’s largest newspaper, was hired by CNN as a producer, then  promoted to an on-air position. She wrote to me: “You know I can’t thank NYFA enough for all the incredible classes. They sure helped me to get where I am now 😊
    Congratulations, Isabella!
    And speaking of Brazil (OK… BrasilLivia Fernanda got a challenging assignment back in August. She had to explain the U.S. Presidential Election — in particular, “political conventions” — to her viewers.
    On a far more serious note, Celina Liv Danielsen covered the violent reaction to the recent shooting of an African-American man multiple times by a white police officer in Kenosha, Wisconsin for TV2 in Denmark.

    Georgia Hammond is working on a series of video essays about the people of Strathbogie Shire, in the Australian state of Victoria, and their efforts to combat the loneliness and isolation that accompanied the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Finally, Turkish alum Esra Ozturk is an example of how, after you study how to make TV news, you might find yourself in a job in which you are interviewed on TV news. In this case, on TRT World, the global English-language service of Turkish Radio and Television.
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    September 9, 2020 • Acting • Views: 1013

  • NYFA Broadcast Journalism: August 2020 Updates

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    Having “Guest Speakers” for instructional classes isn’t unusual. But it is unique when the guest calls-in from the middle of a raging wildfire she is covering in Southern California…

    NYFA alum Karen Hua

    Late Monday, after putting in a full day at KGET in Bakersfield, NYFA alum Karen Hua was sent to cover a wildfire burning out of control. It meant doing live shoots that evening, sleeping in the station SUV, and doing more live shoots Tuesday morning.

    NYFA alum Karen Hua

    She found time to share with the NYFA Broadcast Journalism Summer School participants what it is like to work as a multimedia journalist (MMJ), the challenges of meeting deadlines and how it really is a very small world. (Her roommate is a reporter at a rival TV station in Bakersfield.) If you want a role model, someone who embodies contemporary TV journalism in the United States, I can’t think of anyone who better fits the bill than Karen. Note she is wearing high-visibility fire gear…
    Fifteen years ago I created a documentary that still remains special to me…

    Still from ‘So Very Far From Home’

    August 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. It also marks the 75th anniversary of an amazing rescue. During the final days of World War II, small groups of specially trained American troops parachuted into prison camps in Japanese-occupied China, liberating innocent children, their parents, teachers and friends. They had been imprisoned for the “crime” of being American, British, Australian and Dutch, confined to camps where hunger, disease, brutality and despair were their everyday companions.

    ‘So Very Far From Home’ title card

    These are the real-life stories behind Steven Spielberg’s epic film “Empire of the Sun,” as told by those who actually lived them.
    Decades later, those now-grown children still felt Very Far From Home. Because, to them, “home” would always be China. See their stories now on Vimeo.
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    August 10, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 912

  • NYFA Broadcast Journalism: June Updates

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    This Spring’s graduation was a graduation like no other. Not just here at the New York Film Academy, but across the United States and around the world. COVID-19 pretty much changed everything.

    Cover of the May 2020 issue of ‘The New Yorker’

    As you might expect, our grads — working at local, national and international news organizations — are in the middle of covering what is the story of a lifetime. But one Broadcast Conservatory program grad, award-winning investigative journalist George Colli, has been involved in a singularly unique way.

    NYFA Alum George Colli

    George is developing a new, online news platform, but he put everything on “hold” after he spoke to news sources across his home state of Connecticut about what was then a potentially deadly shortage of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE). Put simply, initially there wasn’t any. George used his reporting skills to not only reveal the depth of this problem, but also find critically needed supplies, then put together an organization to distribute them to the places where they were needed the most. That included literally millions of face masks.

    NYFA alum George Colli (Right) covering shortage of PPE

    While we are proud of all of our grads, there is a special place in our hearts for George Colli. He helped (and continues to help) save countless lives…

    Earlier this year, former NYFA Broadcast Journalism student Sura Ali signed up for one of our short-term Broadcast Journalism workshops. Her “modest” goal was to to do nothing less than change her life. She wanted to reinvent herself. And, based on a recent LinkedIn posting, it looks like Sura found what she was looking for.
    “When I was 28, studying at the New York Film Academy, I was told ‘you are talented, outgoing and lively.’ I did a double take… wait what? They appreciate my voice and activism here? I finally felt at home.”
    Thanks, Sura. We’re glad to know that you found what you were looking for at NYFA.

    As most of you know, I normally spend a lot of time traveling. Over the past three months, beyond weekly trips to the supermarket, I haven’t gone anywhere. But I did have a chance to travel “virtually” to Manila, to participate in an online event tied to World Press Freedom Day. It was great to interact with 125+ journalism students. Thanks to the American Embassy in Manila for the opportunity to participate. (And in the spirit of “Where’s Waldo,” can you find me in the picture below?)

    This week I am “virtually” attending the Cannes International Film Festival, in support of my indie feature film Invisible Love. While I’d love to share it with you’ll have to wait until Spring 2021 for its release. But I can share with you the preview/trailer. A period piece, this China/Vietnam/U.S. co-production takes place during the 1930’s in what was then known as French Indochina. Today, it is Vietnam.

    For the time being, we are only offering our 4-Week Broadcast Journalism workshop onlineYou can find more information here.

    Stay Tuned,
    Bill Einreinhofer
    Chair, NYFA Broadcast Journalism Department
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  • May Broadcast Journalism Department Updates

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    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, TV news programs around the world have changed the way they operate. Our own NYFA News is no exception. All NYFA classes have moved online. Plus, our student producers/reporters face the challenge of creating a news program while everyone in New York is encouraged to stay at home, and all of us are expected to maintain “social distancing.”
    This makes their accomplishments especially impressive, as they have found innovative ways to produce solid, information-based stories. They are also shooting entirely on-location, transforming NYFA News into a reporter-driven program.
    Watch for yourself how the current NYFA 1-Year Broadcast Journalism Conservatory students have met what could be the challenge of a lifetime.
    The skills NYFA students learn can take them in a number of different directions. For Grace Shao, that includes time spent reporting for China Global Television Network (CGTN). She then joined CNBC, based in their Singapore bureau. She is now a media consultant and creative director for PayPal’s podcast series focusing on business innovation in the Asia Pacific region. She is also the Hong Kong Chapter Lead for SoGal, the largest global platform for the education and empowerment of diverse entrepreneurs and investors. (You can read more about SoGal’s mission in the New York Times.)

    If you live in or visit Stockholm, you’ve probably heard the voice of NYFA grad Emilie Olsson, a radio news anchor for Bauer Media, so it’s probably not surprising that she explored the relatively new field of podcasting. She created Älskade Psykopat (Beloved Psychopath).

    When asked about the podcast, Emilie says,”in the podcast we meet men and women who anonymously tell their story or experiences they’ve had with a psychopath or narcissist. It could be in a love relationship, family or at work. Here, real stories are highlighted that rarely can otherwise take place, and my hope is that the podcast will help, support and change!”

    She was also recently featured on the TV4 morning show in Stockholm. Congratulations Emilie!

    Imorse vad jag med i Nyhetsmorgon och berättade om min podd "Älskade Psykopat" som släpptes förra veckan! 🙂 I podden möter vi män och kvinnor som anonymt berättar sin historia eller erfarenheter de haft med en psykopat eller narcissist! Det kan vara inom en kärleksrelation, familjen och på jobbet. Här lyfts verkliga berättelser fram som sällan annars får ta plats och min förhoppning är att podden ska hjälpa, stötta och förändra! I veckans poddavsnitt möter vi Relationsexperten Michael Larsen som berättar mer om det här viktiga ämnet! Hela tv-inslaget finns att se här: https://www.tv4.se/nyhetsmorgon/klipp/att-dejta-en-psykopat-saknar-empati-12603932

    Posted by Emilie Olsson on Monday, May 4, 2020

    It is always exciting when the paths of two NYFA grads cross. Bryanna (“Red Carpet”) Reynolds moved from Melbourne to Los Angeles last year. And while LA is a big place, she found herself interviewing fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind. Alisa, now a published author, is using the communication skills she developed at NYFA as a life coach and motivational speaker.

    Bryanna Reynolds interviews fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind

    This week we began offering a 4-Week Online Broadcast Journalism workshop. There are people around the world who want to study at NYFA. But for many, travel isn’t currently an option. Others need to stick close to home because of family commitments and work. Now there is a 4-Week Broadcast Journalism Workshop for them too.

    Faculty member Evgeniia Vlasova put together a fun little video about how we do distance learning at NYFA.

    As for me, I am hoping the barber shops open up again soon. My beard is taking on Santa Claus-like proportions…

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    May 15, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism • Views: 983

  • New Years Update From New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism

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    We’re only a few weeks into the New Year, but it already feels like months have gone by. That is the essence of digital journalism today. And with the coming of the New Year, I’ve heard from some more NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduates.

    One of the last times I saw Alyssa Cruz was when she was sitting in our Green Screen studio, getting ready to record on-camera segments for her Resume Reel.

    Following graduation, she spent time in New York, then returned to her home country, the Philippines. But then she was on the move again. She wrote recently:

    “I am currently a video editor and narrator for a media company which features food documentaries, here in Singapore.”

    Having worked in Singapore, I can tell you that it is an important hub for Asia-Pacific media production.

    Another graduate, Tommy Germain, was here at NYFA a few weeks back. And he arrived with a camera crew! Tommy is originally from Cameroon, and from there he went to Brazil. He’s had a successful acting career, but now he is working behind the camera as well. His first digital project is all about New York City. He and his team flew all the way from Nigeria, just so he could include NYFA in this program.

    Thanks, Tommy!

    Six months ago, a series of devastating earthquakes hit southern California. NYFA alum Karen Hua, as part of a series of end-of-the-year stories, went back to see how people living in the communities hit hardest by those earthquakes were coping. And the news director at her station sent her by herself…

    This is what it means to be a multimedia journalist (MMJ.) Karen brought along all of the camera, lighting, audio and editing equipment needed for the assignment, packed in the back of the station’s SUV. Karen herself described the trip:

    “Nothing like solo MMJing in the desert, popping your tire and having limited service! It’s one big adventure!”

    Working “on the road” may sound glamorous, but the truth is it often involves plastic dinner plates and lots of coffee…

    If you are one of my former students, you know that I have a tendency to launch into personal stories that I feel help “illuminate” the subjects we deal with in class. (And if you are Evgenia Vlasova, you have probably heard all of those stories at least four times…) 

    One of those oft-told stories is about me traveling on-the-road for a month, trying to record voiceover narrations in a different hotel room every night. (Rooms similar to the one pictured above.) The one way I finally was able to get good audio was to go into a hotel room closet, close the door, put a blanket over my head, and read my script by flashlight.

    For those of you who doubt successful video producers actually use such techniques, I submit the picture below of NYFA grad Wes Newfarmer. Yes, this hack actually works…

    Finally, just before Christmas, Genia and I spent a week in Nur-Sultan, the capital of Kazakhstan. We were there to teach a Journalism workshop for mid-career professionals at Kazmedia, the nation’s dominant TV media company. We weren’t there to tell them what to report, but rather offer suggestions on how to report. The workshop was funded through a contract with the US State Department, one which NYFA won over other colleges and universities. And at the conclusion, one of the national channels there announced they were going to produce a new political talk show based on what we explored in the workshop. (The folks with the certificates in the picture below were some of the attendees.)

    We must have done well, seeing as we will be going back sometime in the spring to hold a second workshop. In addition, NYFA responded to another Request for Proposals from the State Department and was selected to offer a three-week Journalism Summer School for early-career journalists this coming July in Moscow.

    It’s a good thing one of us speaks Russian…

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    January 21, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1361

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Teaches Journalism Workshop in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA) is an internationally recognized thought leader in the field of Broadcast Journalism. That status was recognized by the US State Department, which chose NYFA to conduct a week-long Journalism workshop for mid-career TV professionals in Nur-Sultan, the capital of the Central Asian country of Kazakhstan. Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer, and instructor Evgeniia Vlasova made the long journey from New York City to Kazakhstan just before Christmas, a time of year when Nur-Sultan is known for its bone chilling weather and frequent snow.

    The goal was not to teach “what to report.” Rather, the workshop was about innovative “ways to report.” It also avoided the typical teacher/student paradigm and instead was structured as colleagues sharing potentially useful information with colleagues. 

    Broadcast Journalism Kazakhstan Workshop

    Einreinhofer drew upon his US network television experience, using the PBS NewsHour and NBC’s Meet the Press as models for how to explore complicated, controversial subjects in a non-partisan and engaging way. Vlasova has seven years of TV experience in her native Russia, and is also a graduate of NYFA’s 1-Year Broadcast Journalism conservatory program. She literally spoke the same language as workshop participants. (Many people in Kazakhstan speak both Kazakh and Russian.)

    The culmination of the workshop saw the participants go into a TV studio and create a “pilot program” incorporating the techniques discussed during the week. Their success can be measured in the decision of a major Kazakh TV network to develop an entirely new political talk show based on that pilot.

    Einreinhofer and Vlasova will be returning to Kazakhstan next spring to teach a second workshop there. In July they will conduct a three-week Journalism Summer School in Moscow, aimed at early career journalists. Both projects are being sponsored by the US State Department.

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    January 6, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism, International Diversity • Views: 1492

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism Update – December 2019

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    While workplace events are starting to give way for holiday events, there is still a lot happening in the New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism department.

    We start off with good news from NYFA grad Clyde Gunter, who is starting a 13-month paid internship program next month at ESPN. Clyde will spend time assigned to various departments across the company, learning how this sports media giant works. At the conclusion, he’ll be given an opportunity to join the ESPN staff. Of course, this means moving to Connecticut where the ESPN “mothership” is located in Bristol. Congratulations, Clyde!

    Broadcast Journalism Update December 2019 Clyde Gunter ESPN

    Continuing with sports, alum Gillian Kemerer—after winning a fellowship to study Russian in Moscow—is now producing a new program for the Kontinental Hockey League (KHL), which has 24 member clubs in Belarus, China, Finland, Kazakhstan, Latvia, and Russia. After leaving NYFA, Gillian became the American programming chief (as well as lead US anchor/presenter) for Asset TV. But sports were always her first love, and now she’s found a way to combine hockey and TV. (I wonder how you say “slap shot” in Russian?)

    Broadcast Journalism Update December 2019 Gillian Kemerer
    The Fall 2019 1-Year Broadcast Journalism students had a chance to go behind the scenes at NBC News recently. Thanks to Col. Jack Jacobs (USA, ret.), who is a contributor to MSNBC, they got to visit a network control room, go out onto the studio floor where a program was taking place, plus get their pictures taken on the set of NBC Nightly News with Lester Holt. By the time our students graduate, they’ve already seen major production facilities.

    Finally, we said goodbye to our Fall 8-Week Broadcast Journalism workshop students. As always, they came to NYFA with a variety of personal goals. They left with a deep skillset, and the knowledge that they are now multimedia journalists.

    New York Film Academy wishes the recent grads the best of luck!

    Broadcast Journalism Update December 2019 8-Week Graduation

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    December 4, 2019 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1442