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  • NYFA Alum Irene Mendez on Film Sustainability and a UN Campaign to Change The Film Production Landscape

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    Spanish producer Irene Mendez has always been interested in visual storytelling. With her degree in communications coupled with her education from NYFA’s 1-Year Producing Conservatory, Mendez is seeking change in the production space, aiming to make all media projects more sustainable across the industry. 

    Coming to NYFA, Mendez knew it would give her a new perspective on film production. “I’ve always thought it is essential to know and understand how movies are made in different countries, and I saw in NYFA the opportunity to do so,” she shared. “NYFA has some of the best professionals teachers, including instructors who have won BAFTAs and have been in some of the most important film festivals.”

    NYFA alum Irene Mendez

    From her time at NYFA, Mendez has learned that preproduction is the most essential part of any project. “Work before you get to the set. Study every possibility that might happen once you are filming,” she emphasized. “Be ready for any inconvenience. It is so vital to plan what might happen and be prepared for any kind of problem. It is funny cause it’s actually the same advice I will give to anyone who wants to make a more sustainable film.”

    Mendez first got involved in sustainability in filmmaking after attending Madrid’s Another Way Film Festival in Madrid, which focused on sustainable progress in filmmaking. “I realized that we can do much more. There are many things we can change to create the same entertainment content in a much better way,” urged Mendez. “We can tell the same great stories without hurting the planet and its future. Even more, we can help to be part of the change.”

    Mendez is now involved with Fiction Changing the World, an organization that specializes in sustainable audiovisual productions, working both in reducing the negative impact of productions and creating fiction and entertainment formats that convey important info about sustainable development to the viewers. “There is a lot of things that we can do when we work on a project to reduce the negatives impacts and create good ones. Not only on how we do things but also in how we tell the stories and entertain.”

    This past year, Mendez worked with Fiction Changing the World on a UN campaign to show the world that a new way to make content is possible. “Being part of the UN campaign and seeing Paloma Andres and Rhoda N. Wainwright (Founders of Fiction Changing the World) speak beside people with innovative ideas and famous names as Nikolaj Coster-Waldau (Game of Thrones), makes you understand that we are not alone. There is a lot of people trying to be part of the change. Thousands of unique ideas can help us all to do our bit.”

    Fiction Changing the World has also started their campaign The Dante Movement, which focuses on creating fictional media that will inspire sustainable action and change in the world among others to do their part. “Documentaries are a wonderful way to bring attention to different topics, but they have a couple of problems when it comes to reaching the general public,” shared Mendez when asked why the fictional format is a better medium for the campaign as opposed to documentary filmmaking. 

    Irene Mendez on set

    “They [documentaries] often focus on particular topics, which is fine, but it is more difficult to get millions of people interested in very a specific issue. Also, documentaries are not always the first choice of entertainment for the general public. On the other hand, fiction is a format that is consumed by everyone on the planet; it leaves no one out. It is a more global and entertaining way to send a message and to educate and raise awareness.”

    “For example, I would dare to say that the vast majority of Spaniards of my generation know that water rotates in a different direction in each hemisphere thanks to an episode of The Simpsons in which Bart travels to Australia,” Mendez said. “Fiction is a way to reach every home. We all get motivated watching the Avengers fighting together against Thanos. In our universe, we can all unite to fight our own common enemy.”

    Though The Dante Movement is focused on fictional stories to get the message across to viewers, Fiction Changing the World still allows for other formats to be used to reach different people, like documentaries. In addition to working with the organization, Mendez has also been working on the TV series Foundation for Apple TV+ here in Spain, but what Mendez expressed she is most proud of is producing the first certified Positive Carbon Footprint spot for Greenpeace

     

    “This proves that it is possible to create sustainable content. We had to think from the script in how to make it more environmentally friendly way,” shared Mendez. “I had several meetings with the screenwriters and the production company to explain to them what are the points that make a film create more or fewer carbon emissions and what makes more negative impacts. They quickly understood what was needed and realized that thinking in a sustainable way doesn’t have to compromise the project’s creativity.” 

    As a lover of making films and the environment, Mendez is an advocate for change in the industry, working to make sets reduce their negative impact on the environment from issues like not recycling properly and consuming more on set than necessary. “The reality is that there are many more things we aren’t doing right. The material we use to build a set, the fabric to sew amazing costumes, and the places we choose to use as scenarios are decisions we can make to reduce the negative impact of production,” she explained. “Our responsibility as filmmakers is not solely to entertain, but also to inform and inspire our audiences. We have the power to reach every single soul, and we should use it.”

    New York Film Academy would like to thank Irene Mendez for taking the time to share more about the sustainability movement that is taking place on sets all over the world. With the urgency to act, filmmakers like Irene can continue to make a difference and be agents for change across the industry. NYFA looks forward to seeing what’s next from the alum and to hear more updates on Mendez’s mission for film sustainability. 

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  • New York Film Academy Student Produces Korean Reality TV Show and Wins Bronze Remi Award at Worldfest-Houston International Film Festival

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    From K-Beauty to K-Pop, South Korean’s pop culture is taking the world by storm, flooding the internet with the latest YouTube influencers or musical supergroups and artists. New York Film Academy (NYFA) student, Seoyeon Chloe Shin, decided that now more than ever it was time to create a new kind of reality show, one centered around a pop up salon in Vietnam, affording customers the opportunity to transform themselves using K-Beauty techniques.

    Seoyeon Chloe Shin is an award-winning director and producer, who has produced and directed more than ten documentaries and 100 TV shows that have been broadcasted nationwide and internationally. For the last 16 years, Shin has worked at Taegu Broadcasting Corporation (TBC), a major local broadcasting corporation located in Daegu, South Korea.

    Her show, K-Beauty Salon, was in collaboration with TBC and a local Vietnam TV station. The show went on to win a Bronze Remi Award at Worldfest-Houston International Film Festival in April 2020. Shin has also previously been awarded ‘Best Picture in Local TV Show’ at the Korean Producer Awards (2018) and a ‘Best Picture for Children’ award at the Korean Producer Awards (2017).

    Choi Soo Kyung, Ashley – Ladies’ Code, Park Si-hwan, and Cheon Min-kyu

    “These days, K-Pop culture is so popular worldwide, including the styles of many K-Pop stars,” says Shin. “I wanted to make a cross-cultural entertainment program in Vietnam about K-Beauty.” The show, K-Beauty Salon, follows top Korean stylists as they spread K-Beauty in Da Nang, Vietnam by setting up a pop-up shop to showcase their outstanding beautician skills and have discussions with local customers who come into the shop along the way.

    The cast of characters includes real-life professional stylists and personalities known throughout Korea and internationally including Cheon Min-kyu, a hair designer for various K-Pop stars and Superstar K5 winner and K-Pop singer Park Si-hwan, among others. “These days, entertainment shows should be more internationally focused,” says Shin. “So we planned to use K-Beauty to transform others to look like K-Pop stars.”

    Seoyeon Chloe Shin being interviewed for ‘K-Beauty Salon’

    Shin, who currently studies in NYFA’s 1-Year Filmmaking Conservatory program, decided to study at NYFA to gain an international perspective and learn the visual aspect of filmmaking in order to hone her craft for future shows and films. According to Shin, being at NYFA is a “good opportunity for me to go back to the basics and enhance my skill to make the show [and all projects] more precise.” She also notes that getting a taste of the other disciplines like acting has been “helpful for me to understand the actors.”

    New York Film Academy congratulates Seoyeon Chloe Shin on her Bronze Remi Award and looks forward to seeing her continue to make her own path in international filmmaking for television.

    To watch a full episode of K-Beauty Salon, watch the full video below or click here.

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    June 4, 2020 • Acting • Views: 1792