emilie olsson
Posts

  • May Broadcast Journalism Department Updates

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, TV news programs around the world have changed the way they operate. Our own NYFA News is no exception. All NYFA classes have moved online. Plus, our student producers/reporters face the challenge of creating a news program while everyone in New York is encouraged to stay at home, and all of us are expected to maintain “social distancing.”
    This makes their accomplishments especially impressive, as they have found innovative ways to produce solid, information-based stories. They are also shooting entirely on-location, transforming NYFA News into a reporter-driven program.
    Watch for yourself how the current NYFA 1-Year Broadcast Journalism Conservatory students have met what could be the challenge of a lifetime.
    The skills NYFA students learn can take them in a number of different directions. For Grace Shao, that includes time spent reporting for China Global Television Network (CGTN). She then joined CNBC, based in their Singapore bureau. She is now a media consultant and creative director for PayPal’s podcast series focusing on business innovation in the Asia Pacific region. She is also the Hong Kong Chapter Lead for SoGal, the largest global platform for the education and empowerment of diverse entrepreneurs and investors. (You can read more about SoGal’s mission in the New York Times.)

    If you live in or visit Stockholm, you’ve probably heard the voice of NYFA grad Emilie Olsson, a radio news anchor for Bauer Media, so it’s probably not surprising that she explored the relatively new field of podcasting. She created Älskade Psykopat (Beloved Psychopath).

    When asked about the podcast, Emilie says,”in the podcast we meet men and women who anonymously tell their story or experiences they’ve had with a psychopath or narcissist. It could be in a love relationship, family or at work. Here, real stories are highlighted that rarely can otherwise take place, and my hope is that the podcast will help, support and change!”

    She was also recently featured on the TV4 morning show in Stockholm. Congratulations Emilie!

    Imorse vad jag med i Nyhetsmorgon och berättade om min podd "Älskade Psykopat" som släpptes förra veckan! 🙂 I podden möter vi män och kvinnor som anonymt berättar sin historia eller erfarenheter de haft med en psykopat eller narcissist! Det kan vara inom en kärleksrelation, familjen och på jobbet. Här lyfts verkliga berättelser fram som sällan annars får ta plats och min förhoppning är att podden ska hjälpa, stötta och förändra! I veckans poddavsnitt möter vi Relationsexperten Michael Larsen som berättar mer om det här viktiga ämnet! Hela tv-inslaget finns att se här: https://www.tv4.se/nyhetsmorgon/klipp/att-dejta-en-psykopat-saknar-empati-12603932

    Posted by Emilie Olsson on Monday, May 4, 2020

    It is always exciting when the paths of two NYFA grads cross. Bryanna (“Red Carpet”) Reynolds moved from Melbourne to Los Angeles last year. And while LA is a big place, she found herself interviewing fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind. Alisa, now a published author, is using the communication skills she developed at NYFA as a life coach and motivational speaker.

    Bryanna Reynolds interviews fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind

    This week we began offering a 4-Week Online Broadcast Journalism workshop. There are people around the world who want to study at NYFA. But for many, travel isn’t currently an option. Others need to stick close to home because of family commitments and work. Now there is a 4-Week Broadcast Journalism Workshop for them too.

    Faculty member Evgeniia Vlasova put together a fun little video about how we do distance learning at NYFA.

    As for me, I am hoping the barber shops open up again soon. My beard is taking on Santa Claus-like proportions…

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    May 15, 2020 • Acting • Views: 287

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism – End of Summer Update

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    While there are sure to be some warm days ahead, by and large summer is pretty much over here in New York. Looking back over the past few months, NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduates have been exceptionally busy.

    Two major earthquakes in Southern California had Karen Hua of KGET in Bakersfield putting in long days—and equally long nights. It was a situation where people depended on TV news reporters to provide them with accurate, up-to-date information. When it comes to natural disasters, it can sometimes be a matter of life and death.

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update
    NYFA grad Celina Liv Danielsen is North America bureau producer for TV2 in Denmark. She was asked to explain how the President of the United States had announced a desire to “buy” Greenland from Denmark, a massive island that Denmark doesn’t “own.” President Trump cancelled a trip to Denmark after his “offer” was rejected.

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update
    One of the secrets in our craft is how there are “news” jobs that don’t involve working at TV stations. Take Bruna Bloch, one of our alums in Brazil. She is now the digital media producer for a company called Hub Coworking. She wrote: “I will be responsible for their social media and content :)”

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update
    Broadcast Journalism grad Miraj Haq, who lives and works in Pakistan, recently posted: “This is the good news I have been meaning to tell all of you. I have signed my first drama with Hum Tv/MD Productions.” That’s right, he is poised to become a TV drama star. This follows making the official presidential campaign biography for the current President of Pakistan, and establishing himself as a popular video blogger (vlogger).

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update
    NYFA alum Emilie Olsson is a radio news anchor in Stockholm. She recently wrote an episode of Svenska Mordhistorier, a podcast that probes famous (and not-so-famous) Swedish murder cases. She: “Written script for this episode of the podcast Swedish Mordhistorier! Please go into the link and listen!” It’s another example of how the lines between different nonfiction genres have blurred. In fact, these days any project you create really has to be designed for cross-platform distribution.

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update
    Regular readers of the Broadcast Journalism Update might remember that I am one of the producers of an independent feature film called Invisible Love. Shot in Vietnam, with post-production in China, over the past couple weeks we have been doing ADR sessions here in New York. NYFA Acting for Film grad Kazy Tauginas plays a leading role. I portray a minor character. It’s a period piece, set in 1930’s French Indochina. We are looking towards a Spring 2020 release.


    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update

    Broadcast Journalism Summer Update

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    September 5, 2019 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1036

  • Real Time Social Media Coverage, Fake News, and Stockholm Radio: Updates from the New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism School

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Once again, news programs here in the United States are dominated by reports of a mass shooting. And, once again, news producers have to decide what to report, and how to report it…

    As current and former NYFA students have been taught, “the first report is always wrong.” In other words, initial reports are always fragmentary and usually contain a mix of fact, conjecture and misinformation. That means care must be taken in reporting, with accuracy taking precedence over speed. Now, there is a new complicating factor: As social media and cell phones become ubiquitous, it’s not unusual for “real time” information to emerge from crime scenes. Which is exactly what happened last week during the attack at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Students, trapped in classrooms, sent out desperate text messages and videos.
    While certainly accurate in that they reflected students’ actual experiences and fears, how much of that information should be allowed on-air? Does information like this help clarify, or just sensationalize, a story? Might it actually aid an active shoot locate potential victims? There are no easy answers. But you can be sure these questions were hotly debated in newsrooms across the country. Journalism isn’t easy. If it was, anyone could do it…
    Another reality for contemporary journalists is the amount of blatantly false information that is readily available online. The box office success of the new Disney/Marvel superhero film Black Panther has led internet trolls to claim that at some screenings white moviegoers were beaten up by black audience members. (The reports, of course, are false.) They even included images of “victims.” But few journalists believed there stories, in part because they did Google Images searches of the pictures, and discovered where they had really originated. (One was a picture of the former wife of a recently resigned White House staffer, an apparent victim of domestic abuse.)
    It’s our job to always get information from multiple, verified sources, as well as use the power of social media to investigate what appears on social media.
    Swedish NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduate Emilie Olsson has added another job title to her already impressive resume — radio news anchor. Emilie is working in Stockholm, but as I only understand six words of Swedish I can’t tell you what she is actually reporting. One thing I can report is that radio studios sure look a lot nicer today, compared to the studios I worked in back in my radio days.
    Congratulations, again, Emilie!

    On a personal note, I’m happy to announce that my U.S./China coproduction Shanghai: 1937 will be competing in this year’s Shanghai International Film Festival. It’s a great honor to even be considered, and should help our marketing efforts both at SIFF as well as MIP-TV. The two events will be taking place within days of each other in April, one in China and the other in France.

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
  • Broadcast Journalism Alumna Reporter for Sweden’s Expressen-TV

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    These days, some of the most interesting TV news operations aren’t seen on conventional TV. Case in point, Expressen-TV. Expressen is one of Sweden’s most successful newspapers. But the future is digital, so the news operation has evolved into a cross-platform news service that is now challenging the dominance of traditional broadcasters. And even in Stockholm, much of the talk is about Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

    Last week NYFA Broadcast Journalism students got an “insider” perspective of Expressen-TV from Emilie Olsson, a 2013 New York Film Academy graduate. After working with Swedish state broadcaster SVT and commercial outlet TV-4, Emilie is now a general assignment reporter at Expressen-TV.

    emilie olsson

    She shared with the students her career path since leaving NYFA, and described a typical day for a TV news reporter. She began her fascination for broadcast journalism as early as ten years old. On a two-day trip to New York City, Olsson stopped at NYFA to learn more about its Broadcast Journalism program. It wasn’t long until she was hooked and attending the 8-Week program.

    Emilie Olsson

    “During the 8 weeks I learned a lot about the camera, editing programs. It prepared be both technically and improving my language. It makes me feel like I can do interviews in New York. I like the motivation NYFA gives to students.”

    “If you’re from another country, NYFA will be a change for you,” added Olsson. “But don’t be worried. There are people from all different countries, and you learn from your own path. Enjoy it, and take advantage of your education as much as possible.”

    After class, she spent time talking informally with members of the class. Thanks for visiting NYFA, Emilie!

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail