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  • NYFA’s Ragga Thordarson Continues to Garner International Recognition

    NYFA’s Ragga Thordarson continues to garner international recognition, this time in her native country of Iceland. Interviewed by Morgunblaðið, one Iceland’s leading papers, Ragga spoke of her success in the film and television industry as a producer, director, and consultant.

    The article went on to discuss her role within the New York Film Academy and the importance of the inclusive, diverse environment NYFA fosters.

    You can find the original article here. An English version can be found below.

    “The World of Film is International”

    Ragnhildur Magnúsdóttir Thordarson, or Ragga, as she is called, lives in Los Angeles where she works at the prestigious New York Film Academy. Ragga has produced and participated in a number of creative and film projects both overseas and here at home in Iceland and was among other things, a consultant to the team behind “The Simpsons” on the Simpsons’ Iceland episode.

    Ragga Thordarson | New York Film Academy

    “This started when I graduated with a Master’s degree in Producing For Film and Television  from New York Film Academy in March 2012. I left Iceland in 2010 and graduated two years later,” says Ragga, who has done well in recent years in Los Angeles, California, USA, as a Producer. The projects include short films that have been featured at various film festivals.

    In 2012, Filmbreak named Ragga Best Producer for one such project. Her short sketch video was named Carlos & Brandi 2 and was a follow-up to the first Carlos and Brandi, based on short episodes of the Icelandic-American couple created by Ragga. She also wrote and directed the documentary From Oakland to Iceland. Ragnhildur now works as Director of Admissions at New York Film Academy, Los Angeles, which oversees students’ applications worldwide.

    Consultant for Icelandic Simpsons

    “Before I graduated, I worked as a radio and television host (in Iceland) and as a filmmaker. So I have been producing across platforms for a considerable amount of time,” says Ragga

    “After graduating, I started working as a Producer in LA in various projects. Among other things, I worked for Reebok and was a consultant on “The Simpsons” Iceland episode. I produced and wrote content that was featured on “Funny or Die.” In fact, I was working on various types of projects. Then I started working in events for New York Film Academy. “

    Industry professionals with impressive resumes

    Ragga then began managing Q and A´s and various events at NYFA’s Los Angeles campus. “We had guests coming to Warner Brothers for screenings and Q and A’s. There were people from all different jobs in entertainment and film; screenwriters and actors, for example, such as Linda Woolverton, Josh Brolin and Jonah Hill. Then there were filmmakers, even animation experts and others, some household names and others less known to the public, but industry professionals who have great bodies of work and extensive credits, sometimes behind the scenes. These people come to share their creative and industry experiences with students. This was a great job.” Ragga is raised in the United States, but is Icelandic and has spent considerable time living in Iceland as well. She and her husband have lived in Los Angeles in recent years.

    New York Film Academy is International

    The environment is international

    Ragga managed events at NYFA until she was eight months pregnant with her first child. “I had my daughter Stella three years ago, and was what in Iceland would be considered a ‘last minute mom’” says Ragga, and laughs.

    “After becoming a mom, I went to work on new projects for New York Film Academy and because I knew the school so well, I ended up working in Admissions. My job then evolved into the position I am in now. I love this school, the departments within it work well together, and  more than half of the students are international. This is a very global environment, and it’s great to be surrounded by people who are storytellers from all over the world. You hear Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese and many more languages ​​daily here. It reflects in my opinion the cinema world which is far more international than I think people generally realize. “Hollywood is such a multinational place and New York Film Academy’s student body reflects that. Then filmmakers (including NYFA’s) meet at various film festivals across the world, with their common love of and passion for film. “

     

    July 31, 2017 • Academic Programs, Faculty Highlights, Film School, Filmmaking • Views: 1443

  • NYFA Alumni interviewed for Brazilian TV Program “Planeta Brasil”

    NYFA MFA filmmaking alumnus Rafael Nani recently found a unique venue to share his student NYFA experience — Brazilian TV juggernaut Globo’s program “Planeta Brasil.” The program aims to show how Brazilian nationals live outside of their homeland, highlighting success stories as well as the inevitable struggles in foreign cultures. “Planeta Globo” came to interview Nani in Los Angeles while the then-student was hard at work on the set of his NYFA thesis film, “Bloody Eyes.”

    “Planeta Globo” spoke with Nani about his previous short film projects, including “Rose Garden,” which he filmed during his first year at the New York Film Academy. Nani, who recently completed NYFA’s MFA program at the Los Angeles campus, shared his perspective on some of the finer points of filmmaking and the complexities of directing a film.

    In addition, “Planeta Globo” seized the chance to shine the spotlight on five other NYFA Los Angeles grads and students: acting for film alumnae Sabrina Percario and Carolina Inoue; filmmaking student Iylia M. Idris; film and media production student Ricardo Mata; and NYFA New York filmmaking alumna Flavia Vieira. These five were showing the true community spirit of NYFA while working with Nani on the set of “Bloody Eyes.”

    Each discussed their different roles on set.

    Percario, the project’s supervising producer, discussed the challenges and advantages of working on a multicultural set. Inoue, who is in charge of production design, spoke about the importance of getting right look down for the film. Idris is both first and second assistant camera person for the film, and she explained the different responsibilities for each role. Vieira is lending her expertise to the picture as the lead makeup artist, and discussed the ways good (or bad) make up can effect the look of a film. Finally, Mata, the resident sound technician, explained the differences and similarities between working on short and feature length films.

    You can see the whole segment here, along with more interviews of the cast and crew.

    July 18, 2017 • Acting, Film School, Filmmaking, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1553

  • NYFA Summer Camp Students Enjoy Special Screening of “Top Gun”

    _A4A1610On Saturday, July 1, teens and tweens participating in the New York Film Academy Summer Camp in Los Angeles took a break from the hard work of filmmaking to see a summer blockbuster classic. “Top Gun” was screening in the field at the Autry Museum.  

    Usually, the students are hard at work developing their film projects. Most days, they are learning the difference between camera lens sizes, rehearsing a new acting technique, experimenting with the latest 3D technology, revising a script or shooting on a professional backlot. On this night, however, their hard work was rewarded with a special screening.

     

    _A4A1611This screening was unique because it was surrounded by some of the top food trucks in Los Angeles. For many of the students, this was the first time they had seen a movie under the stars. The combination of live music and multicultural food trucks made the night an event.

    The head of Summer Camps, Ale Salinas said, “This is a unique and fun experience.
    We’re doing this for the students to bond and watch fun movies in a Hollywood way.”_A4A1582

    The New York Film Academy is proud of the great strides out Summer Camp students are making and hope their night off was a fun one.  

     

  • NYFA Alumnus Anthony James Faure Releases “Kids With Guns”

    Anthony James Faure worked in the film industry for five years before coming to the New York Film Academy. When he started the 1-Year Filmmaking Program he was also starting the post-production process on his latest film, “Kids with Guns.”

    Screenshot 2017-06-23 15.06.19

    Using Paris, France, as a backdrop, he shot the feature film over the summer of 2014. The story follows Arno and Mo, two unimportant drug dealers who happen upon a bag filled with MDMA. They decide to sell the trendy drug to the Parisian Golden Youth. Soon they’re forced to navigate the dangerous territory between the real owner of the bag and an overzealous cop that swore to stop him.

    The French thriller was produced with a budget of just €30,000, or around $35,000 in U.S. dollars. He earned the majority of the money via crowd-funding sites, personal savings, and a few grants. Then entire cast and crew worked on a volunteer basis.

    Faure attributes much of that success to his friend and producing partner Antony Renault. Faure said of the experience, “We were trying to get a short film produced in France for a long time. During that time, we wrote ‘Kids with Guns.’ Once the script was done we thought we should just shoot it. It’s that spontaneity that makes the essence of our film: we wanted to shoot now.”

    Faure’s scrappy nature had earned him great footage, but turning it into a film would be an entirely different process. “NYFA helped me in my rewriting process during postproduction. Indeed, after the course I took at NYFA, my understanding of film had evolved, and I managed to use that new knowledge in the editing.”

    The visual effects artist, postproduction manager, and sound mixer for “Kids with Guns” were all students Faure met at NYFA. He enjoyed his experience at NYFA so much he’ll be returning next semester: “I will never stop learning. I have a few feature film ideas and treatments I’ve been working on for a while, going back to NYFA in the screenwriting course will hopefully give me that little push I need to execute them.”

    TEASER KIDS WITH GUNS from Les Films de l’Ours on Vimeo.

    Faure’s next project is a superhero story. “Super Zeroes” is the story of superheroes forced into retirement by a world tired of the destruction their crime fighting causes. They retire to Trinidad-and-Tobago but a crime committed on the island will force them to work together, even if their powers are a bit rusty. NYFA alumni Jolene Mendes and Chloe Na will work with Faure as producers, Sashank Sana is the director of photography, Carolina Lara will do production design, and Daniel Techy is editing.

    The New York Film Academy would like to congratulate Faure’s success. To learn more about Faure click here.

  • NYFA Australia Gold Coast Grad’s “Mannequin” Wins Award at Reel Horror Film Fest

    A self-proclaimed horror film buff, New York Film Academy Australia, Gold Coast alumnus Zach-McCoy Davies’ latest short film “Mannequin” recently won an award at the Reel Horror Film Festival held at Movie World on the Gold Coast. The Reel Horror Film Festival is a part of Warner Bros. Movie World Theme Park’s Fright Nights, which is held during the Halloween season.

    “Mannequin” has also screened at the Princeton Student Film Festival, as well as Willoughby Shorts and Screen It Film Fest in Australia.

    Zach Davies

    His short horror film focuses on a lonely costume designer working within a dark theatre who begins hearing bumps in the night upon the arrival of a bubble-wrapped mannequin.

    “NYFA prepared me for the reality of the business. It is hard work, you will be pushed aside more often than not but it’s how you bounce back that shows whether you can make it in the industry,”said Davies on his experience as a student at NYFA Australia.

    Overall, Davies says he enjoyed the atmosphere of being on the backlot and seeing other films being produced. “The lecturers also made the classes engaging, and being able to direct/write/edit your own short film with cinema grade equipment was a massive plus,” added Davies.

    His advice to aspiring filmmakers is that “no matter what the circumstance, the struggle will always pay off in the end…if you keep pushing forward.”

    Davies has recently started his own video production company servicing small businesses and clients on the Gold Coast, from weddings to corporate videos. Keep an eye out for his next short horror film, which is currently in the works.

    January 11, 2017 • Entertainment Australia, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 2216

  • NYFA: In Celebration of International Education Week (November 14-18)

    For those of us deeply engaged in of the field of international education, last week was analogous to the film industry’s Academy Awards week. This year’s International Education Week (IEW) highlighted the international education community’s efforts to increase the number of students and scholars that cross borders worldwide and, with exuberance, showcased the scores of success stories pertaining to this global exchange of knowledge. The week was also full of discussions and musings about possible changes to the sector that may occur when the new administration begins working in Washington, DC in six weeks.

    International education holds an important place here at the New York Film Academy (NYFA), where more than 50% of the School’s enrollment is international; tens of thousands of visual and performing artists from nearly 120 countries have studied at NYFA since its founding 25 years ago, including dozens of Fulbright Foreign Students.

    For the 2nd year in a row, NYFA is proud to be ranked in the top 5 ‘SPECIAL FOCUS INSTITUTIONS’ that host international students, according to the Open Doors Report, an annual report issued by the Institute of International Education (IIE) that was released last week by IIE and the U.S. Department of State. In the 2015-2016 academic year NYFA hosted 1,492 foreign students in the College’s degree programs, and also welcomed nearly 2,000 additional international students to non-degree and short-term programs that were not counted in the Open Doors Report data.

    On the outgoing side of international education, for two decades NYFA has offered a wide range of study abroad programs at four permanent international locations (Paris, France; Florence, Italy; Gold Coast, Australia; and Sydney, Australia), as well as at many satellite locations, including Kyoto, Japan; Beijing, China; and Amsterdam, Netherlands.

    This year, NYFA made great strides in increasing study abroad opportunities by launching unique faculty led international ‘excursion’ programs, which included NYFA trips for students in the Photography and Documentary Filmmaking Departments. A total of 73 students traveled to Belize, Cyprus, and the Dominican Republic to experience unique aspects of these cultures as well as witness and develop a better awareness of important and critical events currently happening in the countries. This was part of NYFA’s commitment to the Generation Study Abroad Initiative — an undertaking to increase the number of U.S. students studying abroad.

    The New York Film Academy highlighted its study abroad opportunities and accomplishments during the national celebration of International Education Week by hosting a social media contest: NYFA students and alumni had the opportunity to submit photographic representations of what “home” means to them via Facebook or Instagram by including the hashtag #NYFAInternational and tagging @NewYorkFilmAcademy. This contest was open to all current NYFA students (nearly 8,500) from the U.S. campuses in New York, Los Angeles, and South Beach, Florida, as well as students studying at all of our locations abroad in Florence, Italy; Paris, France; and Gold Coast and Sydney, Australia. The winner was announced this past Saturday and the image can be seen here.

    Michael Young, President of NYFA, recently stated, “the power of storytelling is not owned by any one nation, it is an art form the entire world needs in times of peace and stability, and even more so during chaos and uncertainty. Thanks to the most powerful form of communication that exists, we expect our students to be the voices that will be heard through the noise.”

    Like making lemonade from lemons, visual and performing artists have the opportunity to make lovely music — i.e. films, photographs, and performances — from all of the noise now out there.

    November 23, 2016 • Community Highlights • Views: 2510

  • A Talk with NYFA Alumna Bayan Yerimbet

    YerimbetNYFA alumna, Bayan Yerimbet is a well-known producer in Kazakhstan, as well as a businesswoman, wife and mother of two. She has a very creative family. She has worked on two feature projects with her husband, Askar Bissembin, who is a filmmaker and producer. Her sister, Bota Yerimbet, is a screenwriter and director; and her brother, a 19-year-old student who studies marketing, Darmukhamed Yerimbet, was recently invited to make a teaser music video for a film that will soon be released. Bayan Yerimbet found a moment to tell us about her creative family, and how she manages her time for both family and work.

    Bayan, you started out working in the banking sector. What made you decide to work in the film industry? 

    Oh, it’s a very interesting story. I have a law degree. I worked in a law field, and my last job was in the bank. I felt I had reached the highest position at bank that I could at that time, and I thought that I wanted something in my life to change. I realized that I liked both law and film. So I started my research, and then found that these two spheres are crossed in producing. I found it interesting, and we started to look for a film school to study at. We wanted to know how to create a movie, and that’s how it started.

    Your film “The Wedding for Three Persons” was very successful in Kazakhstan. What are you working on currently?

    It was my first film. The second one is “Nauryz.KZ,” and it’s in the post-production phase. It will be released in March because it is dedicated to the national holiday, Nauryz – which means Kazakh New Year. I can say that it is the story about love, spring and the awakening of nature! My husband is the director and I am a producer on this film.

    Is it easy for you to share the set with your husband?

    I realized that it is very difficult. We knew that we would work together on our first project, because we both liked the thesis film that I was developing when I was a NYFA student. But this second film was an order from investors; they found us and paid for it. Our friends sponsored our first film; you know the rule of the three F’s- only Friends, Family or Fools will sponsor your first project. It was more difficult to work with our second film. Even with my husband, we had more responsibility. There were different situations, but we made it. I can say that if you have strong relationships, you can do anything. It is hard, but possible; we passed this exam (laughs).

    Yerimbet and husband

    Can you tell us the secret of how you have time for everything? You have two children, work in the film industry with your husband, and run your production studio.

    I honestly don’t know. I have to do it. Of course it is difficult. You have to be in constant movement because, with children, everyone needs you both at home and at work. There is no secret. You must do everything and be an active person.

    From the time my daughter was three years old, she has been involved in the film industry. We took her to the US where she spent a lot of time on set and played in the movies. But, most of all, my daughter likes to write. She wrote some stories. We’re planning to publish them one day, following her desire to become an author. And maybe she will find it interesting to write screenplays when she’s older and will become a screenwriter, like her parents.

    You studied in the Producing program at NYFA, and your husband studied in the Filmmaking program. Please tell us about your favorite teachers, and what has changed in your life after graduating from NYFA?

    We were looking for a film school in Los Angeles, because this city is the heart of the film industry. We knew the New York Film Academy representative in our native city in Kazakhstan. It was easy for us to discuss our enrollment and to learn more about the school. We were surprised, but everything was arranged in the best way and we received the state grant for the school. We realized that NYFA was what we needed.

    I cannot say that some teachers are better than others; they are all good. I liked Raf Green, he taught us writing for TV. I liked his way of explaining materials. I would also like to speak, separately, about the Director, Dan Mackler. He is great. He helped me with my thesis film when I had some location problems. Dan solved this problem over night. It sounds strange, but there are no limits in America. Students may ask teachers for help, and NYFA instructors are always ready to give you time.

    Everything changed after graduation. My rhythm and lifestyle were changed. Previously, I had a job with a strict schedule, but now I live with the creative process day and night. The film industry doesn’t adhere to strict rules and regulations. It’s not the routine work I had before. Now, I have more creativity. Everything is more interesting. We have more friends and more interests. Everything has become better in our lives. We became more confident and we use this knowledge.

    Yerimbet nyfa

    What are your plans for the future?

    We will shoot films not only in Kazakhstan, but also in other countries. My husband shot four projects here; I want to expand our territory. The world is large; there are a lot of sets. I want to make a feature film in another country, maybe in Russia, the US, Canada and so on. I would like to have more experience. We need to go and try to do more.

    Also, as you already know, my sister, Bota Yerimbet, graduated from the NYFA Filmmaking Program in 2012. And we have an idea to come up with a collaborative project in the near future.

    New York Film Academy thanks Bayan Yerimbet very much for her time. We wish her success in her creative career.

    November 14, 2016 • Filmmaking, Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 2508

  • Hollywood Mogul Brett Ratner Visits NYFA

    Ratner

    Brett Ratner at NYFA LA

    New York Film Academy students enthusiastically lined up at the Warner Bros. lot doors to participate in a Q&A with one of Hollywood’s most successful filmmakers. His diverse films resonate with audiences worldwide and have grossed over $2 billion at the global box office. He’s known all over for his infectious positivity, tenacity for his work and intense passion for films and filmmaking. The man we are referring to, of course, is director and producer Brett Ratner. The discussion followed a screening of X-Men: The Last Stand and was moderated by producer Tova Laiter and Dean of Students Eric Conner.

    Brett Ratner eagerly took the stage and immediately began dispersing meaningful advice to the students. The first point he made was regarding the importance of a mentor. Brett recounted how founder of the New York Film Academy Jerry Sherlock was a vital mentor to him as he was just starting out in his career. He has remained a close friend of Mr. Sherlock and NYFA ever since, regularly visiting and reconnecting with students at the school’s various campuses.

    In addition to his undeniable talent, the trait that becomes apparent within seconds of meeting him is his unending confidence. In regards to this, Brett relayed a very entertaining and downright baffling story about something that happened to him as a young man. While attending college in New York, Brett sent his short film and a letter to 40 of the biggest filmmakers in Hollywood and received 39 rejection letters. Later he was called into the Dean of his college’s office, and was informed that Steven Spielberg called the school and would like talk to him. Brett assumed it was a prank being played on him by his mother or fellow classmates. However, Kathleen Kennedy, the producer of all of Spielberg’s films, later called him on behalf of the legendary director. Brett went on-and-on over the phone to Kathleen about how he was going to be a big director just like Steven Spielberg. Later, Ratner received a check in the mail from Spielberg for his next student film. He took the check to Kinkos and made a gigantic copy of it that he posted in the halls of his dormitory.

    Ratner told a fascinating story to students that conveyed the importance of a film school education. A filmmaking professor, who Brett perceived as obstinate and overly hard on him while he was in school, once made him stay up all night rewriting a comedy script that he felt wasn’t funny before shooting it at 6am the next day. Years later Brett was hired at the age of 26 to direct his first feature Money Talks. He was challenged with shooting the biggest and most important scene, the movie’s climax, on the first day of shooting. Ratner had set up the first shot and was ready for the film’s two stars, Chris Tucker and Charlie Sheen, however he was informed that both actors had refused to leave their trailer. Panicked, Brett visited Sheen and Tucker who explained to the newbie director that they would not shoot the scene because it wasn’t funny. Although he was under a huge time constraint, Ratner proceeded to rewrite the scene with Sheen and Tucker for the next two and a half hours while producers banged on the trailer door insisting they all come out. Brett Ratner understood that the story and his lead actors’ trust in him took precedent over everything else and if he hadn’t have stopped to address these things, he would have probably soon been fired from the movie. And it wasn’t until all those years later that Brett realized his stubborn filmmaking instructor was preparing him for that exact moment which allowed him to continue on a path to unimagined success.

    brett ratner at nyfa

    Brett stayed late into the night answering all the students questions. Afterwards, he took pictures with students and his staff handed out trucker hats with his RatPac company logo. We sincerely thank Brett Ratner for visiting the New York Film Academy and being such a generous friend to the school’s students.

    BIOGRAPHY: Brett Ratner began his career directing music videos before making his feature directorial debut with Money Talks, starring Charlie Sheen and Chris Tucker. He followed with the blockbuster Rush Hour and its successful sequels. Brett also directed The Family Man, Red Dragon, After the Sunset, X-Men: The Last Stand, Tower Heist and Hercules. Ratner has also enjoyed success as a producer. His recent films include the smash hit comedy Horrible Bosses and its sequel, and the re-imagined Snow White tale Mirror Mirror. He also served as an executive producer on Black Mass, starring Johnny Depp. Upcoming RatPac projects include Truth, starring Robert Redford and Cate Blanchett; I Saw the Light, starring Tom Hiddleston and Elizabeth Olsen; an as-yet-untitled Howard Hughes project, written and to be directed and produced by Warren Beatty; and the much-anticipated drama The Revenant, starring Leonardo DiCaprio. His additional producing credits include the documentaries Catfish, the Emmy-nominated Woody Allen – A Documentary, Helmut by June, and I Knew It Was You: Rediscovering John Cazale. He also executive produced the Golden Globe-nominated FOX series Prison Break, and is currently executive producing the television series Rush Hour, based on his hit films. Brett, along with his business partner James Packer, formed RatPac Entertainment, a film finance production and media company, in 2013. RatPac has a first-look deal with Warner Bros. and joined with Dune Capital to co-finance over 75 films including Gravity, The Lego Movie, and American Sniper. Internationally, Warner Bros. and RatPac have formed a joint venture content fund with China’s Shanghai Media Group to finance local Chinese content. In partnership with New Regency, RatPac also finances the development and production of Brad Pitt’s Plan B Entertainment.

    October 14, 2015 • Filmmaking, Guest Speakers, Producing • Views: 4792

  • Saudi Arabian Students at the New York Film Academy

    Like the city where it was founded, the New York Film Academy has become a melting pot of many locations, ethnicities and cultures, proudly welcoming students from all over the globe. In recent years, we’ve accepted more and more degree program students from Saudi Arabia in the fields of filmmaking, acting, cinematography and photography.

    The New York Film Academy is listed as a recommended school by the Saudi Arabian Ministry of Higher Education and is considered the best hands-on film school in the world by many of today’s top filmmakers. NYFA is honored to be the school of choice for many Hollywood filmmakers, actors, and figures from the entertainment world that have sent a son, daughter or a family member to study with us. They include Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Robert Downey Jr., Warren Beatty and Al Pacino, among many others.

    The Academy is also known for hosting one of the most exclusive Guest Speaker Series in the world, which has delivered guest lectures from industry elites such as Al Pacino, Ron Howard, Kevin Spacey and Saudi Arabian-born producer, Mohammed Al Turki.

    To continue its blossoming relationship with Saudi Arabia and its people, NYFA’s Dean of Enrollment Services, Tami Alexander, often holds workshops, auditions, portfolio reviews and information sessions in Riyadh and Jeddah. “I cannot believe the level of talent every time I visit Saudi Arabia,” said Alexander. “We recognize the overwhelming enthusiasm for acting, filmmaking, and photography in Saudi Arabia, and we welcome students from all around the world.”

    For more information about the New York Film Academy or its events in Saudi Arabia, please email Tami Alexander at tami@nyfa.edu or call +1 (212) 674-4300.

    Thank you to the following students whom contributed to this video: Aymen Khoja (studying MFA Filmmaking), Fahad Alharbi (studying BFA Acting for Film), Musab Alamri (studying MFA Filmmaking), Alaa Alrafaihi (studying MFA Photography), AJ Aljandal (studying BFA Filmmaking), Maan Binabdulrahman (studying BFA Filmmaking), Thamer Bagbi (studying BFA Animation), Abdullah Bamjabor (studying BFA Filmmaking), Mohammed Alhiniah (studying BFA Filmmaking), Maram Al Joaser (studying MFA Cinematography).

    September 13, 2015 • Student and Alumni Spotlights • Views: 4238

  • Documentarian Harrison Engle Speaks at NYFA Los Angeles

    harrison engle

    With more than 80 films to his credit, Director/Producer Harrison Engle came to New York Film Academy to share his vast experience with our Los Angeles campus students. Harrison has directed documentaries for nearly every broadcast and cable network. Among his many films are Benny Carter: Symphony in Riffs (A&E), The Lost Kennedy Home Movies (History Channel), They Came to Play (PBS) and Obsessed with Vertigo (AMC). He has created tributes for seven Academy Awards telecasts and is a past president of the International Documentary Association.

    Harrison screened his Emmy nominated film, “The Indomitable Teddy Roosevelt,” which he directed for ABC. Recently the documentary has been re-released as a boxed set with Roosevelt memorabilia.

    Harrison reminisced about studying film before there were film schools, and hiring the young Philip Glass to score his first short film. Engle’s main message to the students was “perseverance” – “Do what you love because you love it and never give up on your dreams.”

    March 27, 2015 • Documentary Filmmaking, Guest Speakers, Producing • Views: 3683