Liberal Arts
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  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Students Visit the Getty Villa

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA) students visited the Getty Villa recently, and came away with some very positive experiences. As part of their studies in filmmaking, acting, and other visual and performing arts, NYFA students must take liberal arts courses in order to complete their Bachelor of Fine Arts studies.

    The students taking Art History this semester were able to take advantage of the unique cultural opportunities available to the Los Angeles region, including the Getty Villa on the Malibu coast.
    Getty Villa April
    The Getty Villa is a one-of-a-kind museum experience that launches students deep into the world of ancient Greece and Rome. After spending class time looking at the artwork and discussing the culture and history of ancient societies, the students were able to absorb the art they’ve been analyzing as closely as possible to its original context.

    Here are some of the reactions NYFA’s Art History students had after their trip to the Getty Villa:

    “It was really amazing that I can see in the Getty what I learned in the class about Greek & Roman art—it made me understand the lectures that we had in the class more.”

    “I learned a lot of things, like about how the ancient people brought tributes to their gods and how they portrayed them on almost anything. The coins were something that shocked me—to see how they where handmade and it was so elaborate despite being so small. Also that art was something expensive and considered for upper classes and how you can even see that on the thumbs of the people.”

    “It has changed and has showed me some things I would love to have in my house one day.”

    “Seeing these works in person is really valuable for students—it made me understand and remember what we learned in the class.”

    Getty Villa April

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    April 13, 2019 • Liberal Arts and Sciences • Views: 397

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Students Tour the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

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    Vampire bats, West African flying squirrels, pangolins and tigers — oh my! 

    During their field trip to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, New York Film Academy (NYFA) students from this summer’s environmental biology course saw a myriad of species firsthand that most people will never be lucky enough to encounter. 

    Mammal Collections Manager Dr. Jim Dines gave a behind-the-scenes tour for the students and generously introduced them to the world of natural history collections and explained the importance of museum specimens to scientific endeavors.

    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County


    The specimens presented have been collected and preserved over the past century for use in ongoing and future biodiversity research. Students also learned about specimen preparation and the usage of specimens for animation and filmmaking

    The environmental biology course is part of NYFA’s Liberal Arts and Sciences department, where the creative artists pursuing their degrees at NYFA can build a foundation in courses ranging from Arts & Humanities to History of Art, Theatre & Media to the Social and Natural Sciences.

    The New York Film Academy thanks Dr. Jim Dines and the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County for giving NYFA students an invaluable insight into this amazing resource and the chance to see and feel such remarkable animals!

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    February 20, 2019 • Liberal Arts and Sciences • Views: 1236

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Teaches Science and the Movies

    FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailThis semester, the Liberal Arts and Sciences department of the New York Film Academy (NYFA) has opened three new Science elective courses for our BFA students: Principles of the Physical Sciences, General Biology, and (everyone’s favorite) Science and the Movies.

    These new courses add to existing science electives Anatomy and Physiology, Geology, and Geography. Furthermore, this semester NYFA is introducing more amazing tools and resources to aid in the student’s learning process, including microscopes and other lab materials.NYFA Liberal Arts & Sciences

    This new additional hands-on-equipment stays true to NYFA’s “learn by doing” pedagogical approach that is applied to its degree and conservatory programs, including filmmaking, acting for film, cinematography, screenwriting, documentary, photography, animation, and musical theatre.

    For BFA students at the New York Film Academy, the liberal arts and sciences is an invaluable part of their curriculum, crucial to the the development of a creative artist. The department, chaired by NYFA’s Dean of General Education, Dr. Mary Samuelson, offers a broad array of classes in the Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Natural Sciences, and History of Art, Theatre & Media.

    In science instructor Camille Boag’s General Biology class, students recently explored common backyard critters under the microscope, squealing at the intricate hairs on a spider’s leg and marveling at the delicate pattern of a butterfly’s wing. These students will never look at a flower the same way again after dissecting them in class, identifying their reproductive organs and reflecting on exactly why these small creatures look they way they do.

    Science instructor Fred Siegel had his students explore the laws of physics in his Physical Sciences course, investigating the principles of reflection and refraction, the relationships between lens shape, focal length and aperture, and measuring the variables which influence the motion of a pendulum. Students clearly had a blast, and were in agreement that learning via hands-on laboratory exercises is an invaluable experience.

    What better way to learn Science?!

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    October 24, 2018 • Liberal Arts and Sciences • Views: 855

  • The Psychology of Learning Film

    FacebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmailDavid Egozi was a college student visiting New York from his hometown of Miami, Florida. One weekend, he saw a magazine advertisement about a certain film school. As the son of a news broadcaster, David grew up surrounded by cameras and lighting. A chip off the block, as they say, since he visited the school and quickly transferred to the New York Film Academy. David’s transition from liberal arts to the technical training provided at NYFA seems to be a seamless one. The most important lesson he has learned here, however, is something beyond skill. “[Department Chair] Claude really pushes us. It’s persistence that matters. It’s commitment. Always giving 110% percent.”

    A remarkably thoughtful young man, David admitted to having difficulty structuring his thoughts. “My head’s always been cluttered. Filmmaking allows me to organize my ideas and my feelings and turn them into something tangible.” He pursued filmmaking after working on creating videos for bars and clubs who were trying to promote their parties. After beginning his studies, however, he understood that the making of art had more to do than marketing it to an audience. Studying narrative helped him to appreciate the internal process of thought and emotion.

    “We shot in Super 35mm. Not digital.” – Nicola Raggi

    Speaking to Nicola Raggi also reveals a filmmaking student who recounts a growing experience. Originally from Sienna University in Italy, Nicola felt his education wasn’t teaching him anything. After winning a Bernardo Bertolucci scholarship for the Cinematography program, he decided to take the plunge into New York City. “I learned more in one year [at NYFA] than I did in five years at Sienna,” he said. Learning both digital and film, Nicola feels his skillset is finally complete. Because of the hands-on nature of our curriculum, Nicola quickly realized “the harsh reality of filmmaking”. The hours of long and brutal. Tensions can run high. As he said, “You learn how to behave on set. Working with the cast and crew can be difficult without sleep or much food.”

    Nicola and David both learned to solve specific types of problems. They learned to adapt and improvise in response to unexpected situations. The ability to think creatively is highly desirable in today’s rapidly changing world. However, can we safely say that many of America’s classrooms focus on helping students develop as creative thinkers? Arts education teaches young people today to create and control. There is a fundamental difference between being consumers of the mainstream media and being producers able to share their creations in order to influence minds and shape how a society behaves. If the Arab Spring and the Occupy movement is any indication, today’s students are growing up in a socially connected world which is very different from previous generations. Modern times have increasingly deemed the exchange of information as pivotal to everyday life, however, educators now are recognizing that information is only useful when it is transformed into knowledge.

    What David learned from the technical knowledge and creative execution was the ability to develop his own ideas, test them, discover boundaries, experiment, receive input, and generate newer ideas based on the feedback he received. Students like Nicola learned to work under stress, collaboratively and creatively, for long periods of time. This is socio-emotional learning. There is evidence that social and emotional capacities are just as brain-based as mathematical and linguistic competencies. Education should have both pedagogic and systemic dimensions. It is statistically proven that the skill-set which socio-emotional education such as the arts can lead to higher standardized test scores. Schools should promote socio-emotional competencies because it is a holistic approach to comprehensively educating our young people. It provides the skill-set necessary to creatively address today’s problems. If anything, a creative curriculum empowers students to believe they’re equipped to do anything they truly believe in.

    After graduation, Nicola continued work as a cinematographer with his production company The Loading Lab. He is the Director of Photography for the commercial being produced by CenterLight Health System, which currently ranks among the nation’s leading resources for long term residential and community-based healthcare. This commercial, which is also directed by NYFA alumnus Dmytro Maliuga, will air in four different languages on local television stations. David is currently finishing up his studies and expressed confidence in his newfound ability. “My dad hired a film crew for his business recently. For casting, directing, editing… I was like, ‘Why?’ I can do it. All of it. I learned everything.”

    To learn more about our filmmaking programs, click here.

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    May 29, 2012 • Cinematography, Filmmaking, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 13674

  • Josh Radnor Speaking at New York Film Academy on Thursday!

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    Photo of Josh Radnor
    Upcoming NYFA Guest Josh Radnor (How I Met Your Mother)

    New York Film Academy welcomes guest speaker Josh Radnor to speak at New York Film Academy LA – Universal Studios this Thursday, October 20th at 7pm. Josh is best known for his starring role as Ted Mosby on the Emmy Award-winning CBS sitcom How I Met Your Mother. His television credits include appearances on Six Feet Under, Law & Order, Judging Amy, and ER.

    Josh Radnor and Elizabeth Olsen
    Josh co-stars in new film Liberal Arts with recent breakout Elizabeth Olsen (younger sister of the Olsen twins)

    Josh made his writing and directorial debut with the 2010 comedy-drama film Happythankyoumoreplease, for which he won the Sundance Film Festival Audience Award and was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize. Josh will screen new film Liberal Arts, which stars Zac Efron, Elizabeth Olsen, Allison Janney and Richard Jenkins. Liberal Arts follows thirty- something Jesse (played by Josh Radnor) who, when invited back to his alma mater, falls for a 19-year-old college student.

    To RSVP, email your full name to laevents@nyfa.edu no later than Wednesday, October 19th, 2011 at 12noon. The screening will be Thur 10/20 from 7-9pm with a Q&A to follow immediately after at Warner Brothers Theater 4.Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 18, 2011 • Acting • Views: 4310