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  • ‘Dark Girls’ Nominated for NAACP Image Award

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    Dark Girls NYFA

    A few years back, New York Film Academy Instructor Cheryl Bedford was asked to be a part of the documentary Dark Girls, directed and produced by Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry. Even with deferred pay, Cheryl immediately jumped on board as Line Producer and her decision couldn’t have been more right. The bracing new documentary was recently nominated for an NAACP Image Award. “The material spoke to me,” said Bedford. “Dark Girls is about ‘colorism’ and how it affects women. Basically, the darker you are, the less attractive you are perceived to be.”

    Skin bleaching products are a billion dollar business worldwide. Dark skinned women in Africa are using these products and doing horrible damage to their skin. In China, Japan, Thailand, Korea, etc., you can’t buy a moisturizer without a skin bleaching component in the product. “As a dark skin black woman, who has been called pretty — ‘even though I was dark skinned’ — I felt that the project had to be part of my filmmaking legacy,” added Bedford.

    When Dark Girls premiered on OWN in June 2013, the film was the number one trending topic on twitter for three hours worldwide. “I am so proud of this project and the entire Dark Girls team. As a filmmaker, when you have a passion project, you hope and dream of this kind of success. I feel quite lucky and blessed that people feel connected to this movie.”

     

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  • Producer Chris Brigham and His Road to "Inception"

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    Chris Brigham NYFAChris Brigham isn’t your typical “Hollywood” producer, which comes as a surprise, considering he produced global blockbusters such as Inception, The Aviator, and Analyze This. He doesn’t even live in Hollywood.“New York is a great place for a producer right now, especially with the tax breaks. There are more shows here now, which means more jobs.” Aspiring filmmakers looking to develop stories, however, should still consider Los Angeles. Everyone’s path will be different. It’s up to each individual to recognize which is one’s true calling.“Not everyone will have the chops for this business.”

    As the guest speaker for our Q&A on Thursday, Chris shared with us his journey from a P.A. in New York to the Hollywood powerhouse he is today. Hustling his way to the top, there was much to be learned in terms of film production. Most importantly, he learned quite a bit about dealing with people, which is something he credits to the Teamsters.The motto? “Money talks. Bullshit walks.” New York is a ‘show me’ city where you have to back up what you’re saying. Chris realized his ability in handling people and their problems was a valuable skill in the industry. Soon he began finding steady work as a line producer.

    So what is a line producer? “It’s a critical job. You are the eyes and the ears managing the movie. Being a line producer demands entrepreneurial skills.”Highlighting some of the details of his job, one learns it’s not your typical 9 to 5. Being a freelance line producer requires a lot of travel, networking, and wisdom to find the right project. “It’s better to work on quality projects but it’s a lot of hard work.”

    His recommendation for filmmaking success? “Get your foot in the door. Make phone calls and start out as a P.A. on set.” Eventually you’ll build a reputation and, who knows, you may end up waking up one day with a call from Christopher Nolan’s team to work on Inception. Luck may play a part, however, this game is a foot-race and the last person standing is the one who makes it in this business. Whether it’s writing, directing, acting or producing, there are thousands of people trying to do the same thing you want to do. The key is not losing sight of your dreams.

    What about maintaining a family and some sort of normalcy? Chris recounted some of his struggles balancing career and family. He recalled a shoot in Montreal where he drove six hours to see his wife and kids on the weekends. Character is indispensable. It seems kindness, too, can pay off in a business with a bad reputation for its conceited personalities.

    Twitter was abuzz for Brigham’s appearance. Irrefutably, the most submitted question of the night was “Is film school worth it?” In response, Chris cited his very first film class in college learning about Fellini and Kurosawa. It sparked his passion for the craft. He encouraged our students to collaborate, build bonds, and sustain a network. In this industry, it’s crucial to meet the right people. Create a foundation for yourself. Film school is what you make of it.

    After the Q&A, Chris handled individual students with personal questions, ranging from “Can I meet Christopher Nolan?” to “How do I get my screenplay funded?” Chris stayed for a good 45 minutes afterwards, patiently handling questions and proving to us how integrity can go a long way.

    Chris Brigham Q&A at NYFA

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    March 5, 2012 • Producing • Views: 5891