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  • New York Film Academy Alumni to be Featured at ArtExpo in NYC

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    Every year, thousands from the art industry attend ArtExpo New York in search of trendsetting art and artists that will be shown in galleries worldwide. Hosting more than 35,000 avid art enthusiasts annually, ArtExpo is the largest international gathering of qualified trade buyers — including gallery owners and managers, art dealers, interior designers, architects, corporate art buyers, and art and framing retailers.

    Kingi Kingibe's photography

    Kingi Kingibe’s photography

    There will be 400+ innovative exhibiting artists, galleries, and publishers from across the globe, showcasing exciting original artwork, prints, paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography, ceramics, giclee, lithographs, glass works and more — all under one roof at Pier 94.

    New York Film Academy artist/alumni featured at ArtExpo 2018 include:

    Kingi Kingibe: From Nigeria, Kingibe has explored the devastating effects of cotton; from its role in the enslavement of African American people to its damaging effects on the planet. In a recent exhibit, the artist framed cotton plants in gold and transfers stunning portraits of Black women in vintage cotton clothing onto actual raw cotton. The exhibit juxtaposes the ubiquity of cotton with its barbaric origins.

    • NYFA alum Jon Henry

      Photos by NYFA alum Jon Henry

    Jon Henry: Henry graduated from the New York Film Academy Photography School’s 1-Year Conservatory and is a teaching assistant at the New York City campus. In his visual artwork, he focuses primarily on the black family and the community at large. He also explores the representation of athletes in fine art. His Stranger Fruit in Smack Mellon’s Hot Picks 2017 and you can read about him on the NYFA blog.

    NYFA alum Ana Paula Tizzi

    NYFA alum Ana Paula Tizzi

    Ana Paula Tizzi: The work she will be showing is entitled Dear Fubá, which illustrates her father’s advice via letters from Brazil. She uses photographs and cinemagraphs (photos with certain features that are animated). The artist says, “Among these are how to achieve self- acceptance, the importance of moderation and the need for persistence in work and life.”

    Alejandro Ibarra: LGBTQ+ families are often labeled “non-traditional,” and NYFA MFA grad Ibarra photographs both straight and LGBTQ+ family portraits in his series Piece by Piece, and addresses the irrelevancy of sexual orientation as it pertains to how families are classified.

    Photography by NYFA Alum Alejandro Ibarra

    Photography by NYFA Alum Alejandro Ibarra

    Natasha Rudenko: Bodily Confessions examines “femininity, national identity, and gender politics as a Russian born, white woman living in the United States.” Rudenko comes from a conservative background in Russia so her viewpoint is a unique one. The artist says, “This project is about my journey of recognizing and interpreting my whiteness, my body, my power, my presence and place through photography.

    Natasha Rudenko photography

    Natasha Rudenko photography

     

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  • Photography Grad Venkata “Venky” Krishna Ganesan Rocks 24 Straight Hours of Street Photography in Times Square

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    From his hometown of Chennai to his recent 24 Hours in Times Square project, one thing that never changes for street photographer and New York Film Academy (NYFA) Photography Conservatory grad Venkata “Venky” Krishnan Ganesan is keeping an open mind. The artist recently challenged himself to spend 24-hours straight, out on the streets in New York City, convincing perfect strangers to let him take their portrait on a chilly winter day (20°!). No wonder this enterprising photographer won the Best of Manhattan Award for Photographer 2017.

    Ganesan is hoping to set an official record with his marathon 24-hour portrait session on the streets of New York, during which he told Fstoppers he blasted through:

    • 2.5 liters of water
    • 3 energy bars
    • 5 cups of coffee
    • 15.9 miles (walking back and forth between Duffy Square to Times Square)
    • 1,000 strangers
    • 680 portraits

    Now, the Photography Conservatory grad tells the NYFA Blog about his process behind his herculean street photography project, his approach to art, and what’s coming next.

    NYFA: What inspired your 24 Hours in Time Square project?

    VKG: The idea is been in my mind for a long period of time. It was more of a goal I wanted to achieve as a test of endurance: Will I be able to stand and talk to a whole bunch of strangers for 24 hours straight, and convince them to get a portrait done in less than a min?

    NYFA: What surprised you the most? What did you learn through this experience?

    VKG: Learning how to handle rejection was very important for growth. Everyone talks about failure. I think if you are open to rejections and you will never have failure.

    I was surprised that I was able to handle rejection for 24 hours non-stop.  

    NYFA: What is your key advice to students interested in street photography?

    VKG: Sometimes you have to be more of a business person than an artist. If you need something, you ask for it and you will get it.

    My advice would be stop clicking pictures with the camera and start clicking with your mind. You will get better pictures.

    NYFA: As a street photographer in these extreme conditions, what were your strategies for endurance? And how did you select your subjects?

    VKG: Endurance will follow with excitement. I am always excited to click pictures of people I can never do that will nature. I go with my gut for my subjects and they turn out to be interesting faces.

    NYFA: What inspires you most about street photography?

    VKG: Interactions with lots of people inspire me the most. When you talk to so many people, you get a new perspective in life, and it gets better the more you interact.

    NYFA: How has your approach to photography grown or changed since studying at NYFA?

    VKG: After being a commercial photographer for many years, I had to unlearn what I did in the past. I think unlearning is the key to learning. You always think you know, but you actually don’t. I learned how to look at photography in a different way in terms of becoming an artist and making money. With the help of all my mentors at NYFA, I have become a extremely evolved photographer.

    NYFA: Do you have any favorite NYFA moments from your time studying with us?

    VKG: I enjoyed every moment in NYFA. That was the most exciting period in my life. You get to see and lean the something new every day.

    NYFA: What’s next for you? Any upcoming projects you’d like to share?

    VKG: I am working on something with which I will be able to give back to other photographers. It’s a website where you can upload your images, and we will help you get your photographs curated. This will help photographers develop their style and introspection.  

    With the 24 Hours project, I will be applying for the book of records and thinking about doing the same project for five more years, and make it into a book of strangers.

    NYFA: Would you say your time at NYFA was at all useful for the work you are doing now?

    VKG: It is like the human brain — I use only 7-10 percent of what I learnt at NYFA, but I am trying to use more and see what happens. I use almost all the basic techniques and NYFA gave me a road map on what how and why, which makes me a better photographer.

    Check out all of Ganesan’s 24 Hours in Times Square project page as well as his website, Venky Photography, for more of his work.

     

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  • Amina Zaher in Vogue Arabia, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, and Jute Magazine

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    This Women’s History Month, we’re very excited to get to share stories from the incredible #WomenOfNYFA in our community, and right now the spotlight is on New York Film Academy (NYFA) grad Amina Zaher.

    Zaher has been working up a storm as a fashion photographer, with her work appearing in Vogue Arabia, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, and Jute Magazine, among others, throughout the Middle East. She took the time to sit down with the New York Film Academy Blog and share her journey from corporate management to the glamorous world of high fashion and lifestyle photography.

    Check out what she has to say…

    NYFA: First, can you tell us a little bit about your journey and what brought you to the New York Film Academy?

    AZ: Well my journey started similarly to any student graduated from business/marketing, headed directly to corporate life. First I started working for Microsoft Egypt for five years as a project manager, then Danone Egypt for another three years as well.

    Within these eight years I used to love photography, but had no idea what I could do with that passion. I used to study photography and retouching through Youtube tutorials, sometime by online courses, and I never thought one day that I might become a full-time photographer — it was only a dream (that I was extremely passionate about)!

    Bit by bit, having many test shoots done with other talented friends in the field (as I was still not sure what kind of photography I want to settle into, but used to have conceptual/fashion sessions), I started getting proposals — not payed, for sure, but some local magazines were interested in collaborating together.

    That’s when I realized that the dream might come true, but I would have to really study. We had many good photographers in the market, and I’ve always thought education is the best way to be up to competition.

    I applied for NYFA in 2014 and it was the experience of a lifetime. It made me first realize that I’m crazy about fashion photography, and also that I’m interested in street and documentary photography. I learned that I can try to use those to compliment my photography mood and compositions, and how important is it to know more about the history of photography!

    Then I came back to Egypt, resigned from corporate life, and started my photography journey. I’d travel every once and a while to a different country with a different culture and try having test shoots there (India, Dubai, the U.S.), and I never stopped studying, as much as possible.

    NYFA: Why photography? What inspires you most?

    AZ: I’ve always felt that I need to make art in some way, and realized that I love to capture portraits of people wherever I’m at. Also I’ve been crazy about fashion since I was a kid, and I used to ask my mum to get me magazines all the time.

    Lately when I started reading about photography I was obsessed with the idea of using lights and shadows to create an interesting image. To me it was very similar to drawing.

    NYFA: Do you have any favorite NYFA moments from your time studying with us?

    AZ: A lot!! Haha … I was super lucky with my TAs and classes. I was broken hearted the day I left NYFA — they were super helpful extremely kind, and I’ve always felt that they believed [in me]. They even gave me the opportunity to have a test shoot on my last day!

    I also remember once we had to shoot random people in the streets and ask them about their stories … it was so much fun.

    One of the great things that I’ve learned from NYFA is how to get inspired, how to read about great photographers work, and learn the story behind every piece, I used to get attached to these artists.

    NYFA: You’ve done a lot of high-profile fashion photography work, published in Vogue Arabia, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, and Jute Magazine. Congratulations! What advice would you offer fellow NYFA students who dream of seeing their own work in such publications?

    AZ: Dream big, guys! Dreams do come true!

    But first work extremely hard, and never think “I’m already good enough,” because there’s never enough in this field. Do as many test shoots as you can, it’s what makes you learn best.

    I never stop stalking talent to collaborate with. Last month I caught a model in Philae Temple, dressed her up with my own outfit, and had a 10-min test shoot that got published in a local magazine.

    Nothing is impossible.   

    NYFA: What inspired your Major Tom editorial shoot?

    AZ: The idea of Major Tom was inspired by the great David Bowie. It was about a girl receiving a phone call about David Bowie’s death and having a very glamorous breakdown.

    NYFA: Do you have a signature style or favorite equipment you are always sure to use? What do you like to experiment with in your work?

    AZ: I Use Canon 5D Mark III with 85mm or 24-70. Shadows, composition and colors are always what I like to experiment with.

    NYFA: What has surprised you most in working as a commercial and fashion photographer?

    AZ: Actually, I never thought that I working as a commercial and fashion photographer would make me realize I can’t stop studying! It’s funny how fast this field can be with new techniques, equipment, moods that you have to keep up with — not only that, but you must be proactive and come up with your own new identity and creativity. It’s endless.

    NYFA: Would you say your time at NYFA was at all useful in terms of the work you are doing now?

    AZ: NYFA is the one thing that pushed me and made me realize that I have to let go of corporate life and move on with my passion. NYFA showed me new aspects. I learned that I don’t have to be a street or documentary photographer to get inspired by that work.

    For example, it made me realize how much I loved the “dirty framing” technique when we were studying street photography, and I used it a lot in fashion. Also pictorialism and juxtaposition were really inspiring to me.

    NYFA: What’s next for you? Any upcoming projects you can tell us about?

    AZ: Just had three new shoots published in Vogue Arabia, Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, and Jute magazine.

    NYFA: Anything I missed that you’d like to speak on?

    AZ: Only that I’m still dreaming really big! I hope someday I will be shooting for brands like Chanel, Prada, Gucci, and Vogue worldwide. It’s still a very long trip, and I will be working Hard for it until I earn it one day. Who knows?

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  • Check Out FAYN Magazine by New York Film Academy Photography Department

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    FAYN is a collaborative photography magazine produced by the New York Film Academy Photography Department. The magazine features students, faculty, and alumni whose work explores contemporary concepts in art and culture.

    We are a community of global visual storytellers, with students and faculty from around the world. We thrive in our constant engagement with a multitude of perspectives and aesthetic practices, and we mine our diverse understandings of cultural identity, beauty, and symbolism in the collective pursuit of artmaking.

    As faculty advisors and editors, we see the inspiring voices of emerging image-makers represented in the content of this magazine, alongside the deep values that guide our program. We prioritize both intersectional diversity and the highest standards of photographic practices in this magazine, as well as in our classroom critiques.

    FAYN is a platform for visual expression, and it’s a celebration of printed media. In this fast-moving digital era of photography, FAYN serves to slow down the experience of viewing photography and experiencing art. As you flip through the pages, we hope that you take the time to savor the experience of holding them in your hand.

    We want to thank the students and faculty who participated in issue #002 of FAYN. We are honored to guide, teach and learn from such creative and talented artists.

    Click here to buy your copy of issue #002 of FAYN.

    Amanda Rowan, Kean O’Brien, and Naomi White

    Faculty Advisors and Editors

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  • Jungle Magazine Features New York Film Academy Grad Jon Henry as Cover Artist

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    We always love to hear what our alumni are up to, and this winter we were delighted to see NYFA New York City Photography Conservatory grad Jon Henry’s work featured as the cover image for Jungle magazine. His composition Untitled 27, Providence, RI was created exclusively for the magazine’s 03 limited edition.

    The UK-based publication focuses on fashion and culture and releases a new issue bi-annually, so it is all the more significant for a photographer to see their work featured on the cover.

    NYFA alum Jon Henry‘s photo on cover of Jungle Magazine

    This time, Henry’s work has the added distinction of representing Jungle’s limited The Resilience Edition, for which he photographed the cover model, actress and artist Jemima Kirke. Kirke’s story of starting over in a new country to provide a better life for her children is resonantly captured by Henry’s photography.

    Jungle features Henry’s work alongside Tove Lo, MNEK, Mark Hartman, Louise Trotter, Sally Bourke, Daniel Castro Garcia, Mark Hartman, Ben Murphy, ALMA, Joseph Special, Poppy Ajudha Blue Lab Beats and Jennifer Neiderhauser Schulp.

    In their forward to the The Resilience Edition, the Jungle editors explain why Henry exemplifies their theme of resilience: “Henry’s work responds to the violence and maltreatment of African American men in the United States, and looks at the resilience of the mothers who have to stay strong despite knowing the extent of the tragedies that could hit their family.”

    NYFA alum Jon Henry

    Jon Henry graduated from the New York Film Academy Photography School’s 1-Year Conservatory and is a teaching assistant at the New York City campus. In his visual artwork, he focuses primarily on the black family and the community at large. He also explores the representation of athletes in fine art. His Stranger Fruit in Smack Mellon’s Hot Picks 2017 and the project was also on the short list for the Lucie Foundation grant.

    Henry also appeared recently as a panelist at one of Miami’s major art festivals, Spectrum Miami.

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  • New York Film Academy Photography Student Tanne Willow Lights Up Profoto

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    While most students only fantasize about having their artwork promoted by a major industry player while still in school, New York Film Academy (NYFA) 2-Year Photography Conservatory student Tanne Willow lived the dream recently with her feature on Profoto.

    Known for decades as a cutting-edge leader in crafting fine light-shaping and flash tools for professional photographers, Profoto is a Swedish company that recently won rave reviews throughout the photography community for their first on-camera flash, the A1.

    Profoto features Tanne Willow and her images in their Local News section. The article, titled “Rising Light: Tanne Willow’s Journey from Dance to Film to Digital,” discusses Tanne’s toolkit of choice, her style influences, and her time at the New York Film Academy Los Angeles campus as a 2-Year Photography Program student.

    My preferred way to work is with people in motion,” Tanne told the NYFA Blog, “Whether it’s fine arts or commercial photography.”

    According to Profoto, Tanne entered NYFA’s program after a 13-year career as a dancer and instructor with only a rudimentary understanding of studio lighting. She has since gone on to develop an editorial style that draws inspiration from the lyrical relationships and creative perspectives of dance: “Tanne sees many parallels between dance and photography, both of which combine factual elements – things that we know or believe to be true, with elements that are suggested or imagined and left to the viewer to interpret from their respective points of view.”

    Also highlighted in the article are many of Tanne’s photos — most created since beginning her studies in NYFA’s Photography School. In them, the conservatory student displays bold artificial lighting and a knack for combining flash with ambient light.

    Hailing from Stockholm, Sweden, Profoto reports that Tanne’s next dream is to see her work showcased in her hometown’s Fotografiska Museum. We look forward to seeing more exciting work from her in the future. Congratulations, Tanne!

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  • NYFA Photography Alumnus Wins Annual Rangefinder Contest

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    For aspiring photographers, few moments are as exciting as finding the right venue for their work. In the case of NYFA alumni Rutvik Katuri, finding the right home for his work has happened more than once.
    Katuri’s series”Holi Colors,” which had previously been published on the cover and as an editorial spread in the prestigious “Imirage” magazine while Katuri was still a student at the New York Film Academy, has just gone on to further success and found a home as the first place winner of the Rangefinder Photography Annual Contest.
    Katuri explained his creative process behind “holi Colors” on his blog, explaining that the shoot was inspired by the sacred festival of Holi: “Holi is an Indian festival mainly known as the ‘festival of colors.’ We came up with a concept to show the dominant colors of Holi and to also show its beauty and vibrance.”
    Rangefinder” (Rf) an award-winning magazine, with a global audience of 111,000, and a digital imprint. In all iterations, “Rangefinder” focuses on weddings and portraits, but their prestigious annual contest offers a chance for coveted exposure and cash prizes for aspiring photographers, providing a unique platform to expand their audience and forge new connections within the photography industry. Contest winners also receive the boon of having their work published in both the digital and print versions of “Rangefinder.”
    In addition to cash prizes, Katuri’s winning photos will be featured in the September issue of “Rangefinder,” in ’The Senior Issue’ on page 66-67, as well as being showcased at WPPI conference & Expo as well as in the online gallery. The digital version of the magazine can be seen here.
    Katuri’s same series will be featured in gallery exhibition at WPPI Conference & Expo 2018 that takes place in Las Vegas in the month of Febuary, as well as appearing as an official selection of Photoville 2017.
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  • NYFA Students & Alumni to Exhibit Work at Brooklyn’s Photoville

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    Photoville, the popular photo festival at Brooklyn Bridge Park, is returning for its sixth consecutive year. The event will take place between September 13-17 & 21-24 and will again include an exhibition of art taken by 23 different New York Film Academy Photography students and alumni who represent a diverse range of cultural identities around the world.


    “White is My New Green” by Nipun Nayyar

    The alumni and student work conveys a wide range of emotions and aesthetics from beauty and sensuality to pain and hardship. It also serves as an example of the variety of ways NYFA students effectively convey their photographic expression — from fine art to fashion, commercial work to photojournalism.

    Faculty at the photography school is also focused on preparing students to apply what they have learned in class and their coursework to the real world.  With the support of the faculty and their peers, our students have created a public art exhibit of exceptional freshness, quality, and breadth.

    Alongside traditional treatments of portraiture and still life, this group of artists has also experimented with abstraction, digital manipulation and a number of other possibilities. These experiences enrich their versatility and vision as they work to find their own distinct styles within the world of photography.


    “The Twins Identity” by Ana Paula Tizzi

    NYFA alumna Ana Paula Tizzi’s work was selected for the second consecutive year. “The Twins Identity” focuses on the relationship between the Brazil native’s mother and aunt, Denise and Dayse, who are identical twins. Tizzi was drawn to “our inability to distinguish, accept, and celebrate our differences.” Over the years, a certain mythology and mystery surrounded the relationship between the two, and Tizzi, a current teaching assistant at NYFA, sought to capture this.

    As an artist always striving to find personal connections and sync personal feelings with whoever she’s shooting, her close family made for ideal subjects. In many ways, Tizzi feels she has been shooting this particular series her whole life. Finding commonality was a key theme and inspiration as the artist shot “The Twins Identity” and this is brilliantly conveyed throughout each photo in the series.


    “Untitled” by Nitin Doppalapudi

    Los Angeles BFA student Nitin Doppalapudi will be showing a nature-inspired piece of Mount Everest. During a 20-day trek up and around the majestic peaks, Doppalapudi said patience was essential due to the unpredictable nature of the climate at such heights.

    “As an artist, my goal is to visually capture the essence of the environment and communicate my vision of the natural world by transporting the viewer to the destination.” The series shows clean near silhouettes of the towering peaks taken at various times throughout the course of day and night.


    “Bodily Confessions” by Natalia Rudenko

    NYFA LA 1-year MFA alumna Natasha Rudenko’s series “Bodily Confessions” explores the artist’s femininity, national identity, and gender politics as a Russian-born, white woman living in the United States.

    “Through Bodily Confessions I place myself into the feminist discourse,” the artist explains. “These images are sort of evidence of self-empowerment and of regaining control of my absence and presence, my past, my identity and my representation.”


    “Untitled” by Arthur Hylton

    NYFA 1-year student Arthur Hylton’s series is all about where the artist is mentally in the moment. “My artwork is about giving the viewer a look into the my mind as i am evolving as a person,” Hylton states.

    Opening night for Photoville will be on September 13th from 4 to 10pm. NYFA will be in container #15.

    The full list of the students and alumni exhibited:
    Nilangana Banerjee
    Juliane Buensche
    Pierre Crosby
    Karyna Dobrykava
    Nitin Doppalapudi
    Stephany Fernandez
    Pernille Brekke Hanssen

    Jon Henry
    Arthur Hylton
    Adam Kasali
    Rutvik Katuri
    Di Wu
    Qingjian Meng
    Manuela Montenegro
    Nipun Nayyar
    Natalia Rudenko
    Monika Sedziute
    Marshall Sharp
    Hanno Schatz
    Adi Tarkay
    Ana Paula Tizzi
    Huimin Zhang

    Vote for the People’s Choice Award below!

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    September 6, 2017 • Photography • Views: 3449

  • Los Angeles Photography Staff and TA’s Gallery Open to NYFA Family

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    The New York Film Academy is known for bringing in renowned guests and graduating excellent artists. With so many projects in constant development, it is easy to forget to stop and appreciate the final product. The Photography Department has decided to take steps toward honoring TA’s, faculty, and staff work by mounting an exhibit of recent work.

    © Kristine Tomaro, 2013

    Displayed on the second floor in the Riverside Building at the Los Angeles campus, the photos are images from 21 members of the department. The goal of the project, according to Department Chair Kean O’Brien, was to open a dialogue to students about the working professionals around them.

    The work exhibited spans several themes and genres in photography, from portraiture, landscape, and still life to conceptually focused projects. Kristine Tomaro, the Photography Department’s senior coordinator, exhibited a piece from her BFA Thesis Show, for which she used a 4×5 film camera and hand printed in a color darkroom. The work is an environmental portrait of her grandmother’ home in the aftermath of a natural disaster.

    © Lara Rossignol 2016, Model: Keira Ward for Zuri Model & Talent

    Laura Rossignol, faculty, created a series of portraits in the likeness of Frida Khalo. The work references the brilliant and historic work of the famous painter, while showcasing Rossingnol’s professional use of studio lighting and portraiture.

    If you’re in the Los Angeles area, you’re invited to come and see the exhibit while it’s up, and support the NYFA family. See the list of participating artists below. There are links to profiles and websites. Congratulations to our many talented NYFA community members!

    List of photographers in exhibition:

    Amanda Rowan

    Aaron Giesel

    Ashley French

    David Blumenkrantz

    Raymond A. Macias

    Benjamin Simpson

    Brendan Baker

    Bridget Batch

    Katerina Stratos

    Jenny Sherman

    Greg Dyro

    Thomas Locke Hobbs  

    Steven C. De La Cruz

    Lane Barden

    Mae Koo  

    Linda Lewis

    Lara Rossignol

    Kean O’Brien

    Gui Cha

    Naomi White

    Charles Owen

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    August 31, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Faculty Highlights, Photography • Views: 1878

  • NYFA Faculty Jaime Permuth Leads “Artistic Identity and Transcendence” Workshop in Guatemala

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    Guatemalan photographer Jaime Permuth returned home for an immensely popular photography workshop entitled “Artistic Identity and Transcendence.” It was a homecoming for Permuth who hails from Guatemala City. He has been a member of the faculty at New York Film Academy since 2011, having taught the majority of the courses offered in the Photography program at one point or another.

    Permuth Guatemala

    Over a series of three intensive sessions, participants explored the intersection of who they are as artists and how to find the right context for their practice in the photographic marketplace. For attendees, there were two avenues of exploration. The first looked at personal and artistic identity and featured writing and visual literacy exercises along with group dynamics. The second segment was more practically focused about how to place artwork within the context of the marketplace.

    Prior to the workshop, Permuth was invited by La Fototeca – the sole photography school in Central America – to present an Artist Talk. La Fototeca was founded in 2009 and is known, in large part, to their prestigious triennial called GuatePhoto, which draws talented photographers worldwide. Jaime’s event saw over 350 people reserve seats in advance. Due to the overwhelming interest, organizers had to switch venues and hold it in the building’s parking garage instead. Clearly in popular worldwide demand, in December, the New York via Guatemala photographer will lead a workshop in Cuba for Camera Voyages. His work can currently be seen at Harlem’s El Museo del Barrio in the exhibition “nasty women / bad hombres.”

    “New York City taught me to work professionally at the highest level. But Guatemala is where I learned to see and feel the world and the life around me.  My native country is never far from my mind,” Permuth says proudly. “As a Guatemalan who has lived abroad more than half of his life – I worry that people back home have ceased to think about me. Or worse even, that I have ceased to be relevant to the cultural life of the country.  And yet, coming back to a standing-room only-crowd at my talk and a sold-out workshop reassures me that perhaps this is not the case.”

    We can confidently say it most certainly is not the case.

    Jaime Permuth Photo 2
    Over the course of his career, Permuth’s work has also been featured on NPR, TimeOut, ArtNet, FeatureShoot, and many other publications. His photography has been displayed all across New York City in the Museum of Modern Art, Queens Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, The Bronx Museum, The Museum of the City of New York, and many other museums. Along with being NYFA faculty, he teaches at the School of Visual Arts in their Digital Photography program. To learn more about Jaime and his work, check out his website.

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    August 9, 2017 • Photography • Views: 2593