Ridley Scott
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  • District 9 Director Tweets His Way to New Alien Film

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    blomkampalien

    It was announced this week that Neill Blomkamp, writer and director of District 9 and the Matt Damon dystopian sci-fi Elysium, will be helming a new Alien film. While another sci-fi sequel isn’t exactly surprising, what is surprising is how Blomkamp got the job.

    In January, the South African filmmaker tweeted some concept art for an Alien film he had conceived. The art, which included freaky renderings of Alien star Sigourney Weaver in a xenomorph-type suit, was supposedly done on spec by Blomkamp—basically, he did it for fun, and to show people what he could do with the series. Fox had not approached him and they were not pre-production artwork.

    The drawings quickly made the rounds around the Internet, gaining praise from series fans. Even Sigourney Weaver chimed in last week, telling MTV that she would be game to participate if such a film came to pass. That seemed to be the straw that broke the studio’s back as 20th Century Fox announced soon after that Blomkamp will make the movie. It’s expected Weaver’s involvement will be announced sometime soon.

    This film will be a separate entity and not affect the in-the-works sequel to Prometheus, Ridley Scott’s spinoff-prequel-reboot to the franchise he personally got off the ground back in 1979.

    Sigourney Weaver can next be seen in Blomkamp’s upcoming robot film, Chappie. Want to direct an Alien film in the future? Check out New York Film Academy’s filmmaking school programs here.

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    February 19, 2015 • Entertainment News • Views: 3387

  • Robert Pucci: From Law School to Hollywood

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    Robert PucciNew York Film Academy Los Angeles Critical Film Art and Intro To Film Instructor Robert Pucci took a rather interesting turn in his career after passing the bar exams for both New York and New Jersey — a difficult feat in itself. What could be a more challenging career path than passing law school and two bar exams? Acting. Robert’s passion for the craft sent him on his way to Los Angeles to become an actor. However, while playing a recurring role on The Young and the Restless, he realized that, at heart, he is a writer.

    Robert has sold over twenty-five screenplays to major Hollywood studios and worked with, among others, Ridley Scott, Oliver Stone, Jan Debont, James Foley, Mark Wahlberg and Roland Joffe. Recently, Robert’s artistic endeavors are focused on books and not screenplays. In his first novel, In Harlem’s Way, Robert continues telling stories and creating characters that examine the complexities of the human heart. Touching on themes of innocence, guilt, forgiveness and ultimately love, the book tells the inspiring story of the unlikely relationship forged between a damaged white youth lost in Harlem, and the first African American man he’s ever met, a bond that heals and forever changes them both.

    With tremendous experience in the industry, in addition to his grasp on the law, Robert provides invaluable insight to his students on the world ahead of them. “I feel any instructor who has been in the trenches, (and I’ve been in them as an actor, and to a far greater extent, as a writer) offers something worthwhile to young artists,” says Mr. Pucci. “That said, my aim is to make this experience about them and not me, but when I can impart lessons learned by way of trial by fire, I share them.”

    Robert currently teaches two courses at the Film Academy that provide an overview of the history of cinema with a look at the many movements and techniques which shape film as they experience it today. In so doing, Robert aims to connect the past to the present and show the students that the filmmakers, actors and writers they currently admire are well-versed in the work of the artists who came before and incorporate what they’ve learned in their own work.

    “I find the enthusiasm of the students infectious. I also enjoy interacting with the international student body at NYFA as in each class I learn something new about cultures from around the world.”
    Robert’s advice to young screenwriters is the same advice he was given when starting out. “There is much in the entertainment industry that is out of your control, so work diligently and focus on the things which you can control, and the main one is your work output. Always be writing. When you finish one script, immediately start the next one.”
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    December 16, 2014 • Acting, Community Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 6361

  • Making it in Hollywood with Donald De Line

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    Producer Donald De Line recently visited students at New York Film Academy as part of the ongoing guest speaker series, following a screening of The Green Lantern. De Line served as President and Vice Chairman of Paramount Pictures, before moving on to Touchstone Pictures. During his tenure as President of Touchstone, he oversaw films including Pretty Woman, Father of the Bride, Ransom, What’s Love Got to Do With It, Rushmore, Ed Wood, and the worldwide blockbuster, Armageddon.

    “My thing was always just to work hard, stay in my office, and keep my head down,” says De Line. “Jeffrey Katzenberg always said that you have to be like a race horse with blinders on. You have to look straight ahead and know what you’re looking for.”

    De Line did just that, and scored his first major hit as a solo producer with The Italian Job, starring Mark Wahlberg, Charlize Theron and Edward Norton. He also produced Ridley Scott’s Body of Lies, and John Hamburg’s I Love You Man.

    “Always be studying,” he said to the theater of New York Film Academy students. “Always be working in whatever form you can. Keep your instrument going. And then learn everything that you can about the business. Stay educated. Know what movies are being made around town. Read the trades. Read every script you can get your hands on.”

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    November 27, 2012 • Guest Speakers • Views: 6358