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  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Alum Ilaria Polsonetti Nominated for News & Documentary Emmy

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA) Documentary school alum Ilaria Polsonetti’s film has been nominated for multiple awards at the 39th Annual News & Documentary Emmys. Made for VICE News Tonight on HBO, “Libya: Intercepting Migrants” is nominated for Outstanding Editor News and for Outstanding Continuing Coverage of a News Story. Winners are announced on the first of October in New York City.

    Ilaria Polsonetti

    Ilaria Polsonetti

    Polsonetti graduated from NYFA’s 1-Year Documentary program in 2011. She is also a graduate of the 3-Month Screenwriting program, which she finished in 2013. Over the course of her career, the editor has melded her knowledge gleaned at NYFA with her M.S. in Sociology (London School of Economics). After graduating, she worked for Market Road Films, Singer Street Films, and as a freelance editor.

    A screenshot from "Dirty Oil in Nigeria"

    A screenshot from “Dirty Oil”

    Since 2015, Polsonetti has worked for VICE in Brooklyn. With the expansive and ever-growing global media brand, she has had the chance to work on urgent and political topics such as Libya’s migrant crisis and Venezuela’s anti-government protests. VICE’s increasingly diverse and critically-acclaimed documentary series’ have been an ideal place for the multicultural filmmaker to hone her skills. In 2017 alone, Polsonetti worked on “German Hotelier turns Hotel into a Migrant Center,” “Dirty Oil,” and “The Politics of Terror” in addition to the aforementioned Libya piece. Along with her work for VICE, Polsonetti has worked on “The Notorious Mr. Bout” and “First to Fall.” She was also recently editor on VICE’s Raised in the System” starring Michael K. Williams (aka Omar on “The Wire”).

    Documentary Chair Andrea Swift says of Polsonetti’s work,”These nominations don’t surprise me in the least. Ilaria has always been an insightful and diligent editor who demonstrated a unique sensitivity to the human experience. She developed a strong sense of story that is equally evident in this piece.”

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Ilaria Polsonetti on her recent success and looks forward to seeing what she works on next! You can watch VICE on HBO’s documentary on migrants in the Mediterranean below:

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  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Screenwriting Grads Celebrate With an Industry Pitch Fest

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    It was that time of year once more as graduating BFA New York Film Academy (NYFA) Screenwriting students recently attended their culminating Industry Pitch Fest Event, held at the penthouse ballroom of the Andaz Hotel on Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood, surrounded by the astounding views of Los Angeles.Screenwriting Pitch Fest Sept 2018

    A catered event and mingling opportunity for students, executives, and faculty alike, this capstone evening celebrated the New York Film Academy’s graduating Screenwriting school students by offering them a unique opportunity to jumpstart their professional development and pitching their film and TV thesis projects to entertainment industry professionals.

    These exceptional writing students spent their final semester in their Business of Screenwriting classes working with instructor Jerry Shandy in conjunction with Faculty Chair Nunzio DeFilippis and other members of the Screenwriting Department, preparing and fine-tuning their pitches. They were also joined by a stellar Screenwriting alum that night. The Pitch Fest shared the venue with an equally impressive event by NYFA’s Producing school.

    The students’ dedication and passion for their work was on display as they pitched their thesis projects, which they had developed for nearly a year. Students left with new contacts, excitement about the scripts they’d worked so hard on, and a sense of what it’s like to meet with industry professionals.

    Considered by the school to be their first night as professional screenwriters, their hard work paid off as the talented and creative students pitched agents, managers, studios, and digital, VR, TV, and film production company executives in a relaxed, roundtable environment.

    Screenwriting Pitch Fest Sept 2018Organized and hosted by Jenni Powell, Ashley Bank, and Adam Finer, the Pitch Fest featured representatives from Hollywood companies including: Jim Henson Company, MGM, Practical Magic, Verve, Rain Management, Little Studio Films, Tremendum Pictures, and Gulfstream Pictures.

    The New York Film Academy wishes to thank all of its participants, particularly our industry guests, without whom this evening could not have been possible. NYFA also extends a big congratulations to all of our BFA graduates and wishes them the best of luck as they move forward in their professional journeys!

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    September 26, 2018 • Community Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 1171

  • Women in Comics: New York Film Academy (NYFA) and Final Draft Host “Write On” Podcast

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    On August 20, 2018, the New York Film Academy (NYFA) partnered with Final Draft to host a live taping of Final Draft’s podcast, Write On, focused on women in comics. The panelists were Shannon Watters, Kirsten “Kiwi” Smith, and NYFA screenwriting school instructor Christina Weir. The event was moderated by Pete D’Alessandro."Write On: Women in Comics"

    Shannon Watters is the senior editor at BOOM! Studios and co-creator and co-writer of the award-winning comic book series, Lumberjanes. Kirsten Smith is a writer and producer (Legally Blonde, 10 Things I Hate About You, She’s the Man, Ella Enchanted, The House Bunny and The Ugly Truth) and Christina Weir is a writer (New X-Men, Skinwalker, Three Strikes, Maria’s Wedding, Bad Medicine, Play Ball, Dragon Age: Deception).

    The panelists were first asked what makes comics unique as an artistic medium. Smith said that, in her opinion, comics are special and intimate because they are “a work of art.” Weir added that, in the comic medium, it is essential to keep things moving; even if the scene is just a conversation, it’s important to keep it visually interesting to the reader. Watters shared that she likes using “the page turn” as a tool to surprise and entertain readers of comics in book form.

    The production of a comic is similar to the production of a play or TV show or film because, to be successful, the comic has to tell a story and, in order to tell a story well, there must be trust and communication between all parties involved. Watters described the relationship between a comic writer and artist as symbiotic and “like a marriage.”

    "Write On: Women in Comics"Weir added that comics are “great learning tools for screenwriting” because they “force [the writer] to get to what’s important… You only have so much space to get your point across.”

    The panelists were asked what they believe the future of the comic industry looks like. Watters said that she believes that in the next couple decades, there will be more and more women, people of color, and LGBTQ comic writers and artists. Weir added, “We are in an age now where kids are encouraged to read comics… Comics are cool!”

    Lastly, Watters’ advice for aspiring comic writers and artists is to “Get your stuff out there!” She encouraged students to share their work on the web and to meet other creative people to network, collaborate, and grow.

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Shannon Watters, Kirsten Smith, and Christina Weir for sharing their experiences and advice for young writers.

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    August 28, 2018 • Guest Speakers, Screenwriting • Views: 1768

  • ‘The Simpsons’ Predicted One of Science’s Greatest Discoveries

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    simpsons higgs boson

    The Simpsons has been ahead of its time since its inception, a forerunner of modern and post-modern television comedy from the moment Homer, Marge, Lisa, Bart and Maggie became the yellow faces of primetime. What’s surprising the Internet this week is that the Matt Groening animated series, now in its 26th season, was also ahead of its time in advanced particle physics.

    In 2012, with help from the multi-billion dollar miles-wide Large Hadron Collider, scientists finally discovered the Higgs boson, the so-called “God-particle” that defines mass for all known matter. But apparently, Homer came very very close to figuring it out on his own in 1998’s episode The Wizard of Evergreen Terrace. The screenwriter of that season nine episode was David X. Cohen, a self-proclaimed math nerd known to sneak in obscure scientific and mathematic equations into The Simpsons and his own series, Futurama. The equation on the board came from a friend of Cohen’s and turned out to be an eerily accurate prediction of the particle’s long-sought after mass.

    Since being reported in The Independent, Homer’s prophecy has gone viral, another step in The Simpsons sudden return to cultural relevance since launching its own streaming service with FXX last summer. Since then, fans have made trending topics of canon-breaking episodes, started popular podcasts reviewing each episode, and—just last month—formed theories that Homer has been in a coma since 1993. It just goes to show that the series is still as talked about as it was when it first aired in 1989—a true testament to its cultural legacy.

     

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    March 5, 2015 • Entertainment News • Views: 3146

  • WGA Announces This Year’s Winners

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    wga winners

    The Writer’s Guild of America—Hollywood’s most prominent union for screenwriters—announced the winners of their annual award ceremony this weekend, in one of the final award shows of the year before the Oscars wrap up the season. The night puts the spotlight solely on writers, with nominees and awards chosen by other writers, and could be a hint to what expect for next week’s Academy Award winners in Original Screenplay and Adapted Screenplay.

    The awards cover categories from film and television, as well as documentary, radio and even video games, though the winners can only be guild members. Here is a complete list of the winners:

    Film

    • Original Screenplay: The Grand Budapest Hotel, Screenplay by Wes Anderson; Story by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness; Fox Searchlight
    • Adapted Screenplay: The Imitation Game, Written by Graham Moore; Based on the book Alan Turing: The Enigma by Andrew Hodges
    • Documentary Screenplay: The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz, Written by Brian Knappenberger; FilmBuff

    TV & New Media

    • Drama Series: True Detective, Written by Nic Pizzolatto; HBO
    • Comedy Series: Louie, Written by Pamela Adlon, Louis C.K.; FX
    • New Series: True Detective, Written by Nic Pizzolatto; HBO
    • Episodic Drama: “The Last Call” (The Good Wife), Written by Robert King & Michelle King; CBS
    • Episodic Comedy: “So Did the Fat Lady” (Louie), Written by Louis C.K.; FX
    • Long Form Original: Deliverance Creek, Written by Melissa Carter; Lifetime
    • Long Form Adapted: Olive Kitteridge, Teleplay by Jane Anderson, Based on the novel by Elizabeth Strout; HBO
    • Short Form New Media—Original: “Episode 113: Rachel” (High Maintenance), Written by Katja Blichfeld & Ben Sinclair
    • Animation: “Brick Like Me” (The Simpsons), Written by Brian Kelley; Fox
    • Comedy/Variety (Including Talk)—Series: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Writers: Kevin Avery, Tim Carvell, Dan Gurewitch, Geoff Haggerty, Jeff Maurer, John Oliver, Scott Sherman, Will Tracy, Jill Twiss, Juli Weiner; HBO
    • Comedy/Variety—Music, Awards, Tributes—Specials: 71st Annual Golden Globe Awards, Written by Barry Adelman; Special Material by Alex Baze, Dave Boone, Robert Carlock, Tina Fey, Jon Macks, Sam Means, Seth Meyers, Amy Poehler, Mike Shoemaker; NBC
    • Quiz And Audience Participation: Hollywood Game Night, Head Writer: Grant Taylor; Writers: Alex Chauvin, Ann Slichter; NBC
    • Daytime Drama: General Hospital, Written by Ron Carlivati, Anna Theresa Cascio, Suzanne Flynn, Kate Hall, Elizabeth Korte, Daniel James O’Connor, Elizabeth Page, Katherine Schock, Scott Sickles, Chris Van Etten; ABC
    • Children’s Script—Episodic And Specials: “Haunted Heartthrob” (Haunted Hathaways), Written by Bob Smiley; Nickelodeon
    • Documentary Script—Current Events: “United States of Secrets: The Program (Part One)” (Frontline); PBS; Written by Michael Kirk & Mike Wiser; PBS
    • Documentary Script—Other Than Current Events: “League of Denial: The NFL’s Concussion Crisis” (Frontline), Written by Michael Kirk & Mike Wiser; PBS
    • TV News Script—Regularly Scheduled, Bulletin, Or Breaking Report: “Nelson Mandela: A Man Who Changed the World” (World News with Diane Sawyer), Written by Dave Bloch, Lisa Ferri, Diane Sawyer; ABC News
    • TV News Script—Analysis, Feature, Or Commentary: “Nowhere to Go” (60 Minutes), Written by Oriana Zill de Granados, Scott Pelley, Michael Rey; CBS

    Radio Winners

    • Radio Documentary: “Three Shots Rang Out: The JFK Assassination 50 Years Later,” Written by Darren Reynolds; ABC News Radio
    • Radio News Script—Regularly Scheduled, Bulletin, Or Breaking Report: “World News This Week,” Written by Andrew Evans; ABC News Radio
    • Radio News Script—Analysis Feature, Or Commentary: “Civil Rights at 50,” Written by Jane Tillman Irving; WCBS Radio
    • Promotional Writing Winner
    • On-Air Promotion (Television, New Media, Or Radio): “How I Met Your Mother,” Written by Dan Greenberger; CBS
    • Video Game Winner
    • Outstanding Achievement In Video Game Writing: The Last of Us: Left Behind, Written by Neil Druckmann; Sony Computer Entertainment

    Hope to win a WGA award one day? Check out our screenwriting school programs here.

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    February 17, 2015 • Entertainment News, Screenwriting • Views: 3934

  • NYFA Los Angeles Wraps its Write Start Contest Workshop

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    NYFA Los Angeles Screenwriting

    NYFA Los Angeles Screenwriting Room

    Often a writer confines his or herself, staying true to his or her own thoughts. Typically, the writer is stubborn, holding strong to the original idea. However, truly perfecting the craft of screenwriting requires practice, guidance and workshopping with peers. Having an environment with knowledgable professionals and like-minded individuals is imperative to the overall goal of completing an industry standard screenplay that could actually be shopped around Hollywood. This notion is precisely what the New York Film Academy’s Screenwriting School is built upon.

    Two weeks ago, we wrapped up the Write Start Contest Workshop. Launched by The Writers’ Store and co-sponsored by New York Film Academy’s MFA Screenwriting Program, the Write Start Contest invited writers to submit a one-page pitch for a feature screenplay idea. Out of hundreds of applicants, eight winners were chosen. The grand prize was a special 8-week workshop at NYFA Los Angeles. Four of the eight winners elected to come to NYFA Los Angeles in person to participate in the workshop. The others participated in an online workshop. At the end of the program, each student completed a finished feature length screenplay, which we believe has the ability to be shown to industry professionals.

    If you have an idea for a screenplay and are looking to hone your craft in a structured environment, be sure to check out NYFA’s Screenwriting Programs!

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    March 27, 2014 • Screenwriting • Views: 4410

  • Superheroes are Taking Over Hollywood (and I Feel Fine)

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     Eric Conner is the Chair of the Screenwriting Department for New York Film Academy’s Universal Studios – Los Angeles campus. With an MFA degree from USC School of Cinema and Television and a BA from UPenn, Eric is currently developing two TV pilots, a sci-fi feature, and trying to add to his collection of ironic snapshots with Stormtroopers. Feel free to email him at eric@nyfa.edu

    I often warn my students to avoid becoming “That Guy.” You know “That Guy.” He’s the one in the theater who complains about a director “crossing the 180 line” or using the wrong lens. He’s the one who LOUDLY critiques a movie in terms of “sequences” and “denouement.” Summer’s an especially difficult time for “That Guy” since the multiplexes are filled with Hollywood’s biggest, loudest, and franchise-iest products — though to be fair, there’s a Wes Anderson gem also playing in the theaters, but it’s on a screen smaller than your car. For my $14 (or $28 if you choose the couches and food service of iPic Theaters in Pasadena), I don’t watch a movie with a notebook or penlight. I go to the theaters simply to be transported.

    Sometimes it’s to the dark emotional wilderness of Into the Wild. Other times to see Kevin Bacon singlehandedly ignite the Cold War in X-Men: First Class. Please note: I’m pretty sure the Cuban Missile Crisis did not actually play out that way, especially since my own father was on one of the ships during those tense thirteen days in 1962. But that didn’t make me enjoy the scene any less. This likely goes back to why I work in the arts in the first place. Similar to many of my peers, I grew up on the films of Allen, Scorsese, Coppola, Ashby, Polanski, and Altman, and spent most of my college days working on one play or another. However, I also spent many hours in my native Delaware reading comics, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, and — please don’t hold it against me or my department — watching professional wrestling! Meaning that I’m equally transfixed by the damaged honesty of The Descendants as when the Hulk mops up the floor with Loki. In fact, my favorite line of dialogue this decade came out of Bruce Banner’s mouth just as he got his green on. (No spoilers here!)

    With The Avengers approaching Titanic-level grosses, we’re likely to see even more superhero films in the future. And I’m here to tell you that’s okay. Some of them will be stinkers (I’m looking at you Ghost Rider), but others will give us the same thrill that George Lucas unleashed in 1977 with one unforgettable opening shot. For every Daredevil, Elektra, or Green Lantern, there’s a Superman or Spiderman 2. I still think  Magneto’s unorthodox escape from his glass prison — featuring a poor guard with “too much iron in his blood” — is as cinematic as cinema can get. Hopefully, the screenwriters who are developing the next mega-budget superhero adaptations remember the wonder they felt as kids, flipping through the pages of The Flash. Or take a cue from Chris Nolan, who’s been treating Batman like part of the Godfather franchise.

    In fact, our writing department in Los Angeles has even begun to address this head-on by adding comic book writing and game design to our curriculum. Both of these mediums have provided some of the greatest modern writing around. As long as there’s money to be made and stories to be told, Hollywood will continue to look for new films from these existing properties. Some films will anger the aforementioned “That Guy.” But other films will sweep him up in their worlds and remind him why he came to film school in the first place. If you want to discuss this with me, I can be found at either the Ahmanson touring production of War Horse or the opening weekend of Dark Knight Rises

    Eric Connor in a tiff with Darth Vader.

    Learn more about NYFA’s screenwriting program. Click here for more info! 
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    June 14, 2012 • Academic Programs, Screenwriting • Views: 6532

  • New York Film Academy Graduate Working on The Bachelor!

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    New York Film Academy graduate Josefine Klemm is working on the latest season of popular ABC series The Bachelor. Josefine, a native of Germany, participated in New York Film Academy’s eight-week screenwriting workshop and and two-year screenwriting conservatory course at NYFA’s Los Angeles – Universal Studios location. NYFA takes a moment to catch up with Josefine about her new position at ABC and life after film school!

    Josefine Klemm

    New York Film Academy graduate Josefine Klemm at graduation

    Thanks for taking the time to sit down with the New York Film Academy blog, Josefine! Are we correct in thinking you took multiple courses at New York Film Academy? 

    In September 2009 I started with the 8-week screenwriting class in L.A. and I liked it so much that I decided to sign up for the 2-year screenwriting class in 2010.  It was a great experience; I wrote several feature screenplays, TV specs, an original pilot, learned how to pitch, shot my own webseries, met Steven Spielberg, John Carpenter, Robert Towne and other idols. It was an incredible experience and on top of it I made some incredible friends in my class.

    Josefine Klemm & John Carpenter

    Josefine meets New York Film Academy guest speaker John Carpenter, writer of Halloween and Escape from New York

    What types of projects have you worked on since studying at New York Film Academy?

    NYFA and specifically our business-of-screenwriting teacher has always pushed us to find internships so that we receive more hands-on experience. Throughout the two years, I interned in three different production companies including one for David Lonner, who is J.J. Abram’s manager, and I continued with that after school gaining great insight into the business side of Hollywood.

    I’ve been writing for German TV shows since 2004 (for example the German “Ugly Betty”) and I continue to write for German production companies; there are various projects at different stages of development. The screenwriting classes have helped me tremendously to improve my writing skills.

    In October 2011, three months after I graduated, I was hired at “The Bachelor” on ABC.

    Congratulations! What type of work do you do for ABC’s The Bachelor?

    There are more then ten producers on the show and I’m their Story Assistant, which involves a variety of tasks to include analyzing footage, finding specific clips, sitting in on screenings etc. It’s something new every day really. In the past years my focus has been on fictional story telling so now is the time to learn everything about documented filming. Reality Television has become a permanent fixture in today’s world and it is a fantastic experience to be a part of the team on one of America’s most successful formats.

    The Bachelor

    What has been the most fun moment working on the show? Any embarrassing moments you are willing to share?

    The most fun moment was my first screening. For weeks and weeks I combed our footage for something we call the “supertease” – the best and most picturesque moments of the season. Seeing it in the screening, how it all came together, was great and totally worth the weeks of searching. The only embarrassing moment I can think of is spilling my lemonade all over my desk in the first week. The keyboard and mouse went dead and I had to get new ones. Oops. Great first impression, Josefine.

    Josefine Klemm Hollywood Hills

    Josefine enjoys the Hollywood Hills between classes

    What comes next? What are your goals in the entertainment industry?

    My goal for this year is to stay in L.A./ the U.S., which isn’t easy if you’re not a US citizen. Hopefully it will work out so I can keep working in the industry here. I also want to finish my scripts that I developed while at NYFA. It’s definitely a challenge to find the time to work on my own material while meeting the high demands of a successful TV show such as “The Bachelor.” NYFA definitely helped me to get to where I am right now, because they prepared me very well for what to expect after graduation and without NYFA I would have never met this great group of writers and friends who keep pushing me to write even after graduation.

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    January 13, 2012 • Acting • Views: 3739

  • New York Film Academy Instructor Writes DiRT 3 Video Game for Xbox and Playstation

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    NYFA Instructor Adam Moore

    NYFA Instructor Adam Moore 

    New York Film Academy instructor Adam Moore recently wrote video game DiRT 3, an auto racing game released last month for Xbox 360 and Playstation 3. The game has been receiving great reviews for gameplay and presentation, including a 9.2 from GameTrailers and an Editor’s Choice award from IGN. Adam comments, “If you’re into off-road, this game will really blow your hair back.” Adam was responsible for creating the NPC’s (non-player characters), which help the story arc and create a narrative for the game. Adam discusses the transition from writing screenplays to video games and how a future gamer can get started in New York Film Academy’s programs in Game Design and Screenwriting:

    Dirt 3

    Adam, how did you first get involved in production of a video game?

    The developer of the game is a London-based company called Codemasters.  For the third installment of their hit off-road racing franchise (DiRT), they wanted to bring an authentic American voice to the game.  They called my game writing agent and asked for a writing sample.  I think my writing partner (Kevin Abrams) and I were the ones selected because we had previously developed an off-road racing reality series, and so we knew the lingo and the world really well.  As for my role in the game’s creation, it was up to me to create the NPCs (non-player characters), define their voices and their relationship with the player character.

    How did your background in screenwriting translate to writing a video game?

    I’ve actually answered this question for my students many times.  ”Writing is writing.”  The craft you learn in your screenwriting workshops translates to any medium you want to work in — movies, tv, comics, video games, you name it.

    What is the biggest challenge in writing for video games?

    The biggest challenge in writing for video games is the fact that you are usually the only writer in company full of gamers and programmers.  Oftentimes, the higher-ups are very good at giving notes on code, but not so much at giving notes on story.  Buggy code has a finite solution.  What the higher-ups at a game developer don’t always understand is that storytelling issues don’t always have such finite, simple solutions.

    dirt3

    When writing oDiRT 3, the challenge given to me was to create three life-like Non-Player Characters, who had emotional depth and were compelling, but would only be heard and never seen.  How do you solve this problem?  Well, I’ll go back to the idea that “writing is writing.”  I fell back on my craft to find the solution and it ended up being extremely simple.  DiRT 3 covers four seasons in the career of a rookie driver.  The NPCs are the rookie’s business manager, chief mechanic, and fan consultant.  The arc we selected was four strangers who come together to do something great.  So, in the beginning of the game, the dialogue is a little more formal.  By the time you get to the end of the game, you’ve been through four seasons of racing with these people, and therefore the dialogue is much more casual — you’ve become best friends.  It was a fun challenge.

    How could a gamer get their start at New York Film Academy?

    What’s great about our screenwriting department is that the entire faculty is working writers.  Very good screenwriters trained me, but some of them hadn’t been actively working in the industry for years.  In our program, the students are learning from screenwriters who are in the business.  For example, in my class, Business of Screenwriting, one of the most important things I teach is how to pitch.  Would you rather learn that skill from someone who hasn’t pitched in a decade or someone who was at a studio or a TV network that morning pitching an idea?  As for our game design program, our mantra is “every student is a storyteller.”  Video games are the mass entertainment medium of the 21st century.  They will surpass movies and television, and maybe already have.  Whereas other programs focus on the nuts and bolts of game design, our focus is creating great, narrative driven games.  We believe that the best games are made when design and story are working hand in hand, rather than a handful of cinematics thrown in every now and then.  Like our web site says, “Anyone can teach you how to make a game.  We’ll teach you how to make a great game!”

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    June 27, 2011 • Acting • Views: 3106

  • NYFA Screenwriting Graduate Adinia Wirasti

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    Adinia Wirasti, a 2008 graduate from the New York Film Academy one year screenwriting program in Los Angeles, is going from staring in movies to writing them.

    Wirasti is a household name in Indonesian film scene. Her success as an actress in Indonesia has earned her…
    – Best Supporting Actress in Indonesian Film Festival 2005 for film Tentang Dia
    – Best Supporting Actress in Bandung Film Festival 2005 for film Tentang Dia
    – Nominee for Best Actress in Indonesian Movie Awards 2008 for film 3 Days to Forever
    – Nominee for Most Favorite Actress in Indonesian Movie Awards 2008 for film 3 Days to Forever
    – Nominee for Most Favorite Couple in Indonesia Movie Awards 2008 for film 3 Days to Forever

    More information on Screenwriting Course

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    January 16, 2009 • Acting • Views: 3996