Stephen King
Posts

  • Bruce Willis Making Broadway Debut in Misery Adaptation

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Bruce WillisContinuing the adaptation trend of bringing big movies to Broadway, Warner Bros. Theatre Ventures has announced plans to bring Stephen King’s famous book and film, Misery, to Broadway this fall, with Bruce Willis making his Broadway debut.

    The play is an adaptation of Stephen King’s popular novel, which was turned into a successful film in 1990 for which Kathy Bates won an Oscar for her turn as Annie Wilkes.

    King’s novel chronicles the travails of romance novelist Paul Sheldon who is imprisoned by his number one fan, Wilkes, following a car accident when she learns that he intends to kill off her favorite character from his books. Wilkes will be played by theatre veteran Elizabeth Marvel who recently had a major role in the third season of Netflix‘s House of Cards playing the character of Heather Dunbar.

    Will Frears, who directed Omnium Gatherum, has been hired to direct the play when it makes its limited run later this year.

    While this will be Willis’ official Broadway debut, he was Ed Harris’ understudy in the off-Broadway production of Sam Shepard’s Fool for Love in 1983. For students enrolling in our Two-Year Musical Theatre Conservatory, this will certainly be a staging worth checking out.

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    March 5, 2015 • Entertainment News • Views: 3780

  • Superheroes are Taking Over Hollywood (and I Feel Fine)

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

     Eric Conner is the Chair of the Screenwriting Department for New York Film Academy’s Universal Studios – Los Angeles campus. With an MFA degree from USC School of Cinema and Television and a BA from UPenn, Eric is currently developing two TV pilots, a sci-fi feature, and trying to add to his collection of ironic snapshots with Stormtroopers. Feel free to email him at eric@nyfa.edu

    I often warn my students to avoid becoming “That Guy.” You know “That Guy.” He’s the one in the theater who complains about a director “crossing the 180 line” or using the wrong lens. He’s the one who LOUDLY critiques a movie in terms of “sequences” and “denouement.” Summer’s an especially difficult time for “That Guy” since the multiplexes are filled with Hollywood’s biggest, loudest, and franchise-iest products — though to be fair, there’s a Wes Anderson gem also playing in the theaters, but it’s on a screen smaller than your car. For my $14 (or $28 if you choose the couches and food service of iPic Theaters in Pasadena), I don’t watch a movie with a notebook or penlight. I go to the theaters simply to be transported.

    Sometimes it’s to the dark emotional wilderness of Into the Wild. Other times to see Kevin Bacon singlehandedly ignite the Cold War in X-Men: First Class. Please note: I’m pretty sure the Cuban Missile Crisis did not actually play out that way, especially since my own father was on one of the ships during those tense thirteen days in 1962. But that didn’t make me enjoy the scene any less. This likely goes back to why I work in the arts in the first place. Similar to many of my peers, I grew up on the films of Allen, Scorsese, Coppola, Ashby, Polanski, and Altman, and spent most of my college days working on one play or another. However, I also spent many hours in my native Delaware reading comics, Ray Bradbury, Stephen King, and — please don’t hold it against me or my department — watching professional wrestling! Meaning that I’m equally transfixed by the damaged honesty of The Descendants as when the Hulk mops up the floor with Loki. In fact, my favorite line of dialogue this decade came out of Bruce Banner’s mouth just as he got his green on. (No spoilers here!)

    With The Avengers approaching Titanic-level grosses, we’re likely to see even more superhero films in the future. And I’m here to tell you that’s okay. Some of them will be stinkers (I’m looking at you Ghost Rider), but others will give us the same thrill that George Lucas unleashed in 1977 with one unforgettable opening shot. For every Daredevil, Elektra, or Green Lantern, there’s a Superman or Spiderman 2. I still think  Magneto’s unorthodox escape from his glass prison — featuring a poor guard with “too much iron in his blood” — is as cinematic as cinema can get. Hopefully, the screenwriters who are developing the next mega-budget superhero adaptations remember the wonder they felt as kids, flipping through the pages of The Flash. Or take a cue from Chris Nolan, who’s been treating Batman like part of the Godfather franchise.

    In fact, our writing department in Los Angeles has even begun to address this head-on by adding comic book writing and game design to our curriculum. Both of these mediums have provided some of the greatest modern writing around. As long as there’s money to be made and stories to be told, Hollywood will continue to look for new films from these existing properties. Some films will anger the aforementioned “That Guy.” But other films will sweep him up in their worlds and remind him why he came to film school in the first place. If you want to discuss this with me, I can be found at either the Ahmanson touring production of War Horse or the opening weekend of Dark Knight Rises

    Eric Connor in a tiff with Darth Vader.

    Learn more about NYFA’s screenwriting program. Click here for more info! 
    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    June 14, 2012 • Academic Programs, Screenwriting • Views: 6379