World Autism Month
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  • New York Film Academy Supports House of Artists Foundation

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    This spring, on a lovely-weather day in Atlanta, Georgia, a very special benefit charitable run took place: The Fantastic Movie Run 10k! The New York Film Academy (NYFA) was proud to be a sponsor of the event.

    Ashley Drayton, the remarkable founder and president of House of Artists Foundation (HoAF), a 501 (c)(3) non- profit that serves the Autistic community, in particular, Artists with Autism, is a graduate (’12) of the New York Film Academy MFA Acting Program.

    The Atlanta run raised crucial funds needed to support the House of Artists Foundation’s mission and work, which is to continue to bring light to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), especially with regard to individuals in entertainment sector who — despite their struggles with ASD— contribute to the industry in so many valuable ways.

    Every runner/walker and volunteer received a NYFA race t-shirt adorned with the HoAF logo and slogan: “Where Autistic Artists Thrive!”

    NYFA is extremely pleased to count Ashley as part of our alum community. Learn more about the organization here: www.HouseOfArtistsFoundation.org

     

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  • Shivalik Shankar’s Film Let Me Be Supports World Autism Month

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    Did you know that April is World Autism Month? This week kicked off with World Autism Day, an event where, as Autism Speaks explained, “hundreds of thousands of landmarks, buildings, homes and communities around the world, light blue in recognition of people living with autism.”

    With the world coming together in blue light for World Autism Day, New York Film Academy BFA Filmmaking grad Shivalik Shankar went a step further to promote awareness and advocacy for autism yesterday, with his film Let Me Be.

    Shankar directed and co-wrote the short film, which follows an autistic teenager who asserts his independence and expresses his needs by escaping from a day care program to visit the beach. It’s a touching story that depicts many perspectives, including the struggles of the teenager’s parents to manage his care as well as the teen’s struggle for autonomy and acceptance

    The themes of acceptance and awareness run deep in Shivalik Shankar’s filmography, with numerous mental health and disability topics depicted in his work.

    The rising filmmaker told Chandigarh’s Daily Pioneer, “I like a strong storyline, a message to spread across, and autism is one issue which needs to be understood better and across all societies.”

    Bravo! It’s always inspiring to see our alums putting their storytelling skills to work for a purpose. If you’d like to become involved in World Autism Month, visit Autism Speaks.

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