writer
Posts

  • New Indie Comedy “Teacher of the Year” Comes to NYFA

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Teacher of the Year
    This week New York Film Academy Los Angeles gathered to watch the new indie comedy Teacher of the Year and participated in a Q&A with the movie’s writer/director Jason Strouse and lead actor Matt Letscher. The event was moderated by Tova Laiter, who has producing credits on such films as Varsity Blues, The Scarlett Letter, and Cop and 1/2.

    In a mockumentary fashion, Teacher of the Year depicts the honest efforts of a well-meaning teacher, surrounded by an eccentric faculty at Truman High School, as he grapples with whether he should accept a lucrative California Teacher of the Year award, which would mean leaving his job and abandoning the students he cares so much about. The movie was funny and played very well to the students who concluded its the kind of Indie movie they would like to make.

    Teacher of Year Director

    Jason Strouse (left) and Matt Letscher (right)

    Jason Strouse began his writing career on NBC’s Caroline in the City and appeared regularly as a stand up comic before ditching it to become a teacher in L.A. He directed The Audience that premiered at the Palm Springs Short Film Festival. Teacher of the Year is his first feature film. Matt Letscher was most recently seen as “Charles” in the Academy Award nominated Her. His extensive film/TV credits include Scandal, The New Adventures of Old Christine, The West Wing, NYPD Blue, Criminal Minds, and Entourage. He currently recurs on the final season of Boardwalk Empire as Joe Kennedy and on Castle.

    Writer/director Jason spoke about his roots in TV comedy show writers rooms and doing stand up comedy. The dynamics of both are very similar. He said that TV comedy writers are the funniest and smartest people you will meet, and keeping up with their witty banter in the room is quite a challenge. The writers room is where the magic happens. If your goal is write for TV, you should try to get in the room at all costs. Jason started out as a writer’s assistant, his talents were soon apparent to the writing team and he replaced a staff writer who couldn’t cut it. Later after having worked in the industry, Jason transitioned into teaching high school and works as a principle as he continues to write, produce, and direct. His teaching experience is what inspired Teacher of the Year. He used the mockumentary style to utilize his resources and tight shooting schedule to the greatest effect. The result is an outrageously funny and touching film coming from a truthful place.

    Actor Matt Letscher spoke in depth about the actors process. He discussed the differences between theater and film acting—which he describes as an “acting out” (theater) as opposed to “letting the camera in” on what’s going on inside the actor (in film). However, regardless of the acting style, the process of breaking down a script and understanding the reasoning and motivation behind every action is always the same. He believes acting is just like carpentry or any other craft, and your skills improve only by “doing the work.” Matt carried a massive notebook around with him on the set of Teacher of the Year, filled with his own notes about his character and the story, and would delve into it every moment he got in between shots and takes. When he worked early in his career with Anthony Hopkins, he saw a similar scenario with Hopkins making notes on every paragraph of his script.

    Jason and Matt stayed after their Q&A to mingle and take pictures with students. We sincerely thank Jason Strouse and Matt Letscher for visiting NYFA, and wish them the very best in their future filmmaking ventures!

     

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 17, 2014 • Filmmaking, Guest Speakers, Producing • Views: 6919

  • Screenwriter John Glosser Joins NYFA’s Business of Screenwriting Class

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    John GlosserOn July 29th, Black List screenwriter John Glosser joined New York Film Academy’s Business of Screenwriting class to discuss breaking into Hollywood, his life as a writer, and his unique perspective on the film industry.

    “If you’re not addicted to doing this, don’t do it,” Glosser advised, “Seriously, it has to be addiction because it’s just such a difficult career to break into. You have to want it as bad as an aspiring athlete wants to become a professional.”

    Glosser spoke about his early days working on-set as a Unit Production Manager on such horror films as Splinter and about first getting repped. “I went backwards; I got my agent and then my manager, but it all comes down to relationships. In the end, a friend of a friend is what got my script in front of the right people.”

    That script was The Broken, which not only placed on the 2012 Blacklist, but got Sam Worthington attached to produce and Nicolas Cage attached to star. The crime drama tells the story of a farmer in 1967, grieving for his murdered son, who discovers a suspicious cover-up on the part of a corrupt sheriff.

    Glosser went on to speak about his experiences developing projects with various A-list directors and producers since The Broken hit the town, but closed with his belief about the most fundamental thing in this business —

    “Voice”, Glosser affirmed, “is the most important attribute as a writer you can look to build. You all have one, otherwise you wouldn’t be here. You need to cultivate that voice… I don’t care if you write a story about an Elf living in Tokyo who drinks tea and falls in love with a flower. If you have a voice, people will notice.”

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    August 6, 2014 • Guest Speakers, Screenwriting • Views: 8412

  • NYFA Student Writes and Directs Italian Web Series

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Vera Bes

    Even though Francesco Mazza had already been writing for popular television shows in Italy, he decided to move to New York to challenge himself and become a better artist. “My interest in New York Film Academy came from the all hands-on idea,” says Mazza. “When you are in your early 30’s, you can’t afford to lose time, and at NYFA everything happens fast.”

    During Francesco’s first year in New York, he came up with the idea for a pilot and pitched it to a couple of Italian production companies. The pilot, Vera Bes, caught the interest of Matteo Scortegagna, C.E.O. of Zodiak Active Italy. From there, Francesco wrote the pilot and soon after the project was green-lit. Francesco was not meant to direct the pilot. It was only after he showed Scortegagna his NYFA first semester film, a comedy called Man-eaters, starring his fellow NYFA acting students. After viewing the short, Scortegagna hired Francesco to direct his own pilot.

    “The web-wise record-setting of $80,000 displays how important the project is for us, who strongly believe in the upcoming development of the web market,” said Scortegagna. “As we were half way through pre-production, I came to know that not only was Francesco a talented screenwriter with prestigious credits in our country, but he was also attending a one-year course in directing and filmmaking at the New York Film Academy. Therefore, I immediately offered him the directing of the pilot, a challenge that was brilliantly accomplished by Francesco last March.”

    Vera Bes is about a girl with a special power: using the mystery of “lucid dreams” leant by her grandmother, she is capable of getting into people’s dreams. In her spare time, Vera becomes a “dream consultant”- anybody affected by a recurring nightmare can come by her studio for a consultation. After investigating both in the world of dreams of the client and in reality, she climbs down the client’s unconscious to set him free from the nightmare. But Vera has a further motivation: finding and killing the evil presence who murdered her grandmother.

    “I like to think of NYFA as a toy or a musical instrument. If you apply yourself hard, you’re willing to do sacrifices, you humble yourself no matter what you did in the past and you constantly struggle to learn. And you are going to have real fun. Before studying at NYFA, I’ve always had lots of ideas, but it’s thanks to NYFA that I finally learned how to visualize and dramatize the stories I had in my mind. I would have never been able to direct a project like Vera Bes if I hadn’t had the possibility to learn the essential rules of screenwriting with Ben Maraniss or the importance of externalizing the characters’ struggle with Michael Sandoval. Not to mention all the priceless advice my directing teacher, Amos Poe, gave me throughout the year. I also fondly remember the speech [Filmmaking Chair] Claude Kerven gave us the very first day of school about the true meaning of being a filmmaker — something I’ll never forget.”

    Vera Bes is already part of the official selection for the upcoming 2014 Marseille Web Series Festival. Francesco’s goal is to create a character driven TV drama like Breaking Bad, American Horror Story, True Detective, etc. The idea of Zodiak Active is to find international production companies willing to partner up and produce an international product to be sold worldwide.

    VERA BES – Promo from Vera Bes on Vimeo.

     

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    July 30, 2014 • Filmmaking, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 5151

  • Screenwriter Steve Desmond Joins NYFA’s MFA Screenwriting Biz Class

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
    Steve Desmond

    Steve Desmond

    On July 22nd, screenwriter Steve Desmond joined New York Film Academy‘s Business of Screenwriting II class to discuss tips and advice on breaking into Hollywood as a writer, sharing many valuable insights.

    After winning a Student Emmy while still an undergrad, Steve emphasized that while he was initially focused on getting repped as a writer after school, he soon realized that the most important thing he could focus on was becoming a great storyteller. He advised young writers to not be so focused with finding an agent or manager right away and instead to work on their craft and to keep getting better.

    “Write every day,” Steve advised. “I keep a calendar in my office, and I mark it off for every day that I get a few hours of writing done. And then I push myself. Can I do ten days, twenty days, thirty days? Of course, sometimes it’s necessary and refreshing to take breaks. But you should be writing 5 to 6 days a week whether it be outlining or writing pages.”

    Steve also works as a Commercial Treatment writer. He spoke about this unique area of the business as a way to support yourself as a fiction writer, while still getting paid to write and learn about the commercial production process. He also discussed working as a freelance Reality TV Treatment writer and brought in examples of such work.

    Steve finally spoke candidly about the process of developing projects with producers, stating that producer notes can be great, but that you always want to be careful to both agreeing with a note that you initially love, or in rejecting a note that you initially don’t like too fast. “Both can get you into trouble,” Steve warned, “and it’s best to take it all in and think it over after a script meeting.”

    Along with his writing partner, Steve has written and developed film projects with production companies such as Imagine Entertainment, Blacklight Transmedia, and the Disney Channel. Steve currently has a biopic in development with Level 1, a sci-fi thriller with Davis Entertainment, and thriller On Your Doorstep with Haven Entertainment, where Steve is attached to direct.

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    July 29, 2014 • Guest Speakers, Screenwriting • Views: 5763

  • NYFA Los Angeles Wraps its Write Start Contest Workshop

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
    NYFA Los Angeles Screenwriting

    NYFA Los Angeles Screenwriting Room

    Often a writer confines his or herself, staying true to his or her own thoughts. Typically, the writer is stubborn, holding strong to the original idea. However, truly perfecting the craft of screenwriting requires practice, guidance and workshopping with peers. Having an environment with knowledgable professionals and like-minded individuals is imperative to the overall goal of completing an industry standard screenplay that could actually be shopped around Hollywood. This notion is precisely what the New York Film Academy’s Screenwriting School is built upon.

    Two weeks ago, we wrapped up the Write Start Contest Workshop. Launched by The Writers’ Store and co-sponsored by New York Film Academy’s MFA Screenwriting Program, the Write Start Contest invited writers to submit a one-page pitch for a feature screenplay idea. Out of hundreds of applicants, eight winners were chosen. The grand prize was a special 8-week workshop at NYFA Los Angeles. Four of the eight winners elected to come to NYFA Los Angeles in person to participate in the workshop. The others participated in an online workshop. At the end of the program, each student completed a finished feature length screenplay, which we believe has the ability to be shown to industry professionals.

    If you have an idea for a screenplay and are looking to hone your craft in a structured environment, be sure to check out NYFA’s Screenwriting Programs!

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    March 27, 2014 • Screenwriting • Views: 5575

  • How to Land a Literary Agent Out of Film School

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail
    radmin

    Linne Radmin

    Tuesday night, we had a packed house at New York Film Academy Los Angeles for our guest speaker — brought in by Producer Tova Laiter — Literary Manager, Linne Radmin. Radmin spent seven years at ICM as a senior literary manager before founding the Radmin Company, a boutique literary management and production company based in Beverly Hills that represents screenwriters and directors. She has worked with a diverse range of clients which include Jason Segel (Forgetting Sarah Marshall), Leslie Dixon (Mrs. Doubtfire), and Wes Craven (A Nightmare on Elm Street). The Radmin Company’s current clients include Student Academy Award winner Shawn Wines, who is working on a comedy pilot for Warner Bros, Cinco Paul and Ken Saurio (Despicable Me), Todd Alcott (Antz), and several more.

    When Linne was asked by Tova how she decides whom to represent, she responded, “I have to be in love with the work and believe that I can help the writer.” Tova then asked her to expand on how the writer/manager relationship works and how it’s formed; Linne responded, “Crafting a query! The initial letter – and it needs to be intelligent, clear, creative, decisive. Be bold, but not obnoxious.”

    The film school students, many of which were screenwriters, had very specific questions for Linne. Lawrence, a writer, wanted to know where in a screenplay does Linne expect to find the inciting incident. Linne, without hesitating, responded, “page 12 or 13!”

    She also admitted that although good writing is often timeless and just plain good, there are definitely topical trends which affect or are affected by the marketplace. Currently? “Rom-coms are out, emotional sci-fi is in!”

    Linne admitted that today’s market is tough for film school students and emerging writers, encouraging them to have both an agent and a manager. “Agencies have so scaled back – so better to have more voices in the marketplace by having both an agent and a manager, ideally a manager first. Eventually, also, a lawyer!”

    Linne added that in all of this, branding is highly important! When asked by a student how she sifts through all the material she examines she said, “Passion for the material coupled with an idea, notion, plan about how I can use this is the marketplace. Branding matters.”

    Asked by Diego, an MFA Filmmaking student from Columbia, how directors carve themselves out when looking for representation, she said, “Shoot, shoot and shoot! Put it online, do a webseries. Just keep shooting!” Having a reel is obviously of utmost importance for directors, whereas screenwriters should be more concerned with GOOD WRITING.

    Stephanie, a Swedish screenwriting student asked Linne what is important to think about for those looking for a manager. “Hopefully you will have choices here. You want to feel that the manager listens to your ideas. Also, what feels right is probably the way to go!” She also said it’s okay to be your own advocate, “If you feel your manager’s involvement is too little or too much, speak up!”

    About the influx of lucrative quality television, Linne said, “Now some managers are strictly working in TV, but less are only in features. There is some great programing on TV now, so it’s good to be open.”

    Asked by a student about getting into a TV writing room, Linne admitted this is highly competitive and usually the Showrunner (Executive Producer of TV show) hires his or her writers.

    Some general tips that came out during the evening:

    1. Become a writer’s assistant if you can

    2. Agents and managers should take 10%

    3. Enter legitimate writing contests

    4. Brand yourself! Once you have a hit, you will have more freedom to write something within a different genre

    Linne also noted that the Radmin Company is always looking for interns!

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    January 17, 2014 • Film School, Guest Speakers, Screenwriting • Views: 7729

  • NYFA Acting Graduate Publishes New Book Based on Creativity

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Sinapsis

    New York Film Academy acting graduate Dr. Ariel Orama López published a new theoretical framework based on Creativity and the recent findings of Neuroscience: the textbook is called CRËATIVE SYNAPSE: CRËATE.YOUR.UNIVERSE© (2013). It is the first theoretical framework that explains the behavior of the human being by integrating the following variables: creativity, neuroscience, and the new influence of the virtual universe. The collection book will be presented in the atrium of the Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico on Wednesday, September 11, 2013, in a distinguished context of artists, health professionals and academics.

    Dr. Gregory J. Quirk, a prominent American researcher specialized in Neuroscience & Luca Spaghetti, the well-known Italian amico writer -who served as a guide to Elizabeth Gilbert on her journey through Italy while writing Eat Pray Love– elaborated the prologues of this substantial investigative work of thirteen years: they provide in their prologues a nourished and accurate view of this text book, according to their experiences. The art of the book includes the precious paintings and drawings of Ektor Rivera, Celestino & Ramon Bruin (from the Netherlands).

    The text arises from a practical & theoretical framework created by Dr. Ariel Orama López that departs from his preparation, experience and knowledge in science, human behavior, natural sciences and performing arts. It includes experiences of the author -with a logbook on his sensible hands- in contexts gifted with creativity and spirituality such as Mexico, California, Spain and Italy.

    AG COLOR

    Dr. Ariel Orama Lopez

    Ariel is a Puerto Rican professional actor & psychologist. He is a collegiate actor of the Colegio de Actores of Puerto Rico, a certified Executive Coach (specialized in Crëative Life Coaching) from TISOC, Barcelona, Spain and a licensed clinical psychologist. He was selected as a finalist of Taller TELEMUNDO: actores, in Miami, directed by the well-known actress nominated for an Oscar in the movie Babel (2006), the distinguished Mexican actress & professor Adriana Barraza.

    Ariel Orama has worked in commercials, theatre, short films, indie films, documentary, series, television, media writing, and voice-overs, summing more than 200 projects in arts (2001-2013). He is also a composer and singer: one of his songs (Seré/I’ll be) was selected for the Puerto Rican dramatic documentary The Eyes of the People (producers: Roberto Ponce & Gladys Albino) and his song (Alto Vuelas/ Flying Higher) was selected as the official Puerto Rican song for the World March from the Peace, celebrated in Argentina and New Zealand.

    He performed in fourteen Short-Films in California during his NYFA training in Acting for the Film (Los Angeles). Recently, he was selected as the Creative Coach & Consultant for the television program Idol Kids Puerto Rico (from the recognized English franchise Idol ©) and have offered courses at the Colegio de Actores de Puerto Rico and other relevant forums about Psychology of Character.

    Ariel directed and starred on the Puerto Rican Short-Film ESTEB∆N, which received national and international laurels and/or nominations (Director’s Choice: Best Film, Top Ten Film, Best Actress, Best Cinematography, Best Editing & Best Music) in following contexts: Spain, California, Orlando and Puerto Rico.

    The Puerto Rican actor has received different awards in performing arts, including Best Direction Selection, Best concept, Best actor & Best Script. Ariel was one of the five recipients of the Sor Isolina Ferré Medal in Education of the Government of Puerto Rico, unique National distinction in service and education.

    Dr. Orama is member of the new movement Voces Unidas por el Cine Puertorriqueño and this special project has been presented on Telemundo (Acceso Total) expressing about of all this wonderful initiatives and his vision about the film in the Island.

    Currently, Ariel is co-directing and working as the scriptwriter (producer: Vane Vélez) for a documentary that will be presented on Festivals based on the emerging Film Industry in Puerto Rico -the “Shining Star of the Caribbean”-, called CINECONTRASTES©: it includes testimonials of relevant figures such as Jacobo Morales, Idalia Pérez Garay, Vicente Juarbe, among others relevant figures of the Industry.

    The book appeals to artists, academics, psychologists and to the general public. It is published in Spanish and soon in English. It can be acquired in different libraries of the World, including Amazon, Barnes & Noble and Sony.

    Prsentacion libro Dr Orama sept2013

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    September 9, 2013 • Acting, Diversity, International Diversity, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 9092

  • Larry David Is a Pretty, Pretty Funny Writer

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    We’re wishing Larry David a happy birthday, even though he hates The Happy Birthday Song. The man wouldn’t even sing for Ben Stiller. Like most things in life, it’s a whole “to do.” This is essentially the core of Larry’s humor. His witty observations about the nuances of life and rules of society are the basis for arguably two of the best comedy programs ever made. Seinfeld, which he co-created with Jerry Seinfeld, revolutionized the sitcom. At a time when sitcoms were churning out an A story and a short B story, Larry was packing in four intertwined character arcs into one episode. Jerry, George, Kramer, and Elaine were integral parts of each episode. If you dissect individual episodes, you would find that a lazier show runner could have easily created four whole episodes out of one show. Each of those episodes would still be funny, but that’s not Larry’s style. This is what puts Larry above the rest. His show will forever be a part of popular culture. One can compare everyday situations to episodes of Seinfeld, as if the show was a handbook for life. Even quoting Seinfeld is a part of life for some. Here are some of the more popular phrases from the show, in case you’ve been living under a rock.

    After Seinfeld, Larry was given a little more freedom with his own HBO show, Curb Your Enthusiasm. Again, breaking barriers. His loose, single camera improv approach to comedy was refreshing and new. We no longer needed the three camera sets and canned laughter to let us know when it was safe to laugh. Plus, Larry brings himself in front of the camera, and he’s actually “pretty, pretty” good at it. The plots and subplots of the episodes are established in an outline written by David and the dialogue is almost all improvised. Much like Seinfeld, the subject matter in Curb Your Enthusiasm often involves the intricacies of daily life and problems of a conventional society. Larry David always has the need to express his feelings of such problems, which almost always leads him into awkward situations. The situations range from absurdity to pure bad luck, and yet we somehow relate. Check out some of these hilarious moments from the show.

    After eight seasons of Curb and nine seasons of Seinfeld, there’s no telling where Larry can go next. One thing we can tell you, is the man has made quite a pretty penny on his brilliant comedy creations. But, his unique character can never be swayed by money. He is a true individual with an unmistakable personality that can only be, Larry David.

    Tweet us your favorite moments from Seinfeld and Curb Your Enthusiasm @NYFA!

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    July 2, 2013 • Acting • Views: 7904

  • Congratulations NYFA Grads!

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Congratulations to New York Film Academy’s new crop of future filmmakers! Last weekend, 54 filmmaking students graduated from the school’s Los Angeles campus. Four-time Emmy Award winner, Jay Kogen, delivered a rousing commencement speech to the grads. The producer/writer/director, best known for his work on The Simpsons, Frasier, The Tracey Ullman Show, and Malcolm in the Middle, inspired the students to chase their dreams.

    Congratulations to the AFA Filmmaking graduates: Eskil André Brattgjerd, Carlos Garcia, Mohammad Lajevardi, James Neill, and Elias Smith; and to our MFA Filmmaking graduates: Yagiz Acar, Farah Fuad Alhashim, Victor Aminger, Charles Ancelle, Kirsten Eleanor Anderson, Adrian Aquino, Annique Arredondo, Raul Asensio Molina, Eduardo Augusto, Stefani Avila, Tatiana Beller, Askar Bissembin, Nataliya Bobytska, Nicolas Brouwers, Neil Casey, Pablo Chozas Zambrana, John Chuka, Filipe Ferraz Coutinho, Min Dai, Lu Feng, Seth Fuller, Jubilee Gamaniel, Rafael Garcia, Matthew Gengel, Yifei Guo, Yang He, Shirley Hon, McKinley Johnson, Prarthana Suneel Joshi, Christian Jurgensen, Geet Kandya, Dae Kyu Lee, Nancy Lee, Rishi Mehta, Jason Mohan, Adrian Morales Ramos, Roona Mukhopadhyay, Rima Naim, Sishu Peng, Juhi Roddam, Bryan Rooney, Thomas Schade, Galo Semblantes, Anna Skrypka, Keith Thompson, Aili Wang, Robert Womack II, Zi Xiang, Wen-Hsin Yu!

     

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    February 1, 2013 • Acting, Filmmaking, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 6343

  • Pixar’s Rules for Great Storytelling

    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Pixar Animation

    Thanks to department chair Eric Conner of the screenwriting program for this great tip! A story artist at Pixar Animation Studios had been tweeting a series of “story basics” which illustrates the kind of talent that exists at Pixar. Their overwhelming success is easily demonstrated by the numbers. 7 out of 12 Pixar films were nominated for Best Screenplay at the Oscars and the company won the Animated Feature Academy Award 6 times. They have 13 consecutive box-office toppers and 2 Best Picture nominations. If that’s not proof of their genius, then we don’t know what is. Steve Jobs purchased the studio in 1986 for $10 million. It was originally a hardware company with only one animator on its staff. Now it’s widely reputed to be one of the best film studios on the planet. Here’s a quote on Deadline from the producer of the latest Pixar hit Brave, which debuted at number 1 at the Box Office this weekend. They attribute their phenomenal success to the basic wisdom that story trumps all.

    It was not easy. The biggest challenges at Pixar are always the stories. We want really original stories that come from the hearts and minds of our filmmakers. We take years in crafting the story and improving it and changing it; throwing things out that aren’t working and adding things that do work. All of that  is just the jumping off point for the technology and how we are going to make this happen.

    Without further ado, here are 22 pointers from Pixar’s story artists for creating a compelling story and building a mega-successful franchise. Don’t forget to learn more about our animation curriculum and become a top-notch animator for Pixar. Click here to request more information on the program!

    1. You admire a character for trying more than for their successes.

    2. You gotta keep in mind what’s interesting to you as an audience, not what’s fun to do as a writer. They can be very different.

    3. Trying for theme is important, but you won’t see what the story is actually about til you’re at the end of it. Now rewrite.
    Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    June 25, 2012 • 3D Animation, Film School, Screenwriting • Views: 3855