animated movies

9 Hilarious Animated Films for the Whole Family

When it comes to animated films for children, parents resign themselves to watching the same few entries over and over and over again. That’s why they are always thrilled to find something that is hilarious for both children and adults, and more importantly, has replay value.

Here are nine hilarious animated films the whole family can enjoy, even if they end up watching it dozens of times. 

Frozen

Two very different sisters – one ordinary and one with magical ice powers – are emotionally separated after an accident as children. With the help of some new friends and a sister’s big heart, they learn that love can thaw the “iciest” of situations.

This blockbuster hit was popular with viewers of all ages. Not only is the lovable, huggable snowman Olaf full of little quips to keep viewers giggling, but Anna is by far the most awkward and relatable Disney princess to date. Fans of the film will be glad to hear its sequel, Frozen II, worked on by NYFA Animation instructor Kelley Williams, will be released later this year.

Shrek

Dreamworks release three sequels and a spin-off to Shrek in less than a decade, so fans of ogres with Scottish accents have their options, but the original has a level of hilarity that is nearly unmatched. The groundbreaking film created a brand new subgenre of CGI kids films brimming with modern pop culture references that parents could laugh along to.

Austin Powers star Mike Myers is a comedy natural, but even his scenes are stolen by fellow Saturday Night Live alum Eddie Murphy, as Donkey, and Antonio Banderas’s adorable-but-deadly Puss in Boots.

The Lego Movie

President Business is out to destroy the world, but not if the prophecy of the Piece of Resistance is true. Can an ordinary construction worker truly be the special master builder who has the power to stop an evil tyrant from freezing the entire Lego world in time?

Combining amazing animation that mimics stop motion, laugh-a-second gags, a surprisingly heartwarming story, and an all-star stellar cast, The Lego Movie was a gigantic hit upon release as well as a critical darling. Accolades include a BAFTA Award for Best Animated Film, the Critics’ Choice Movie Award for Best Animated Feature, and countless other nominations.

 

The Secret Life of Pets

What do your pets do when you aren’t at home? Some may laze around; others may go on an adventure to find their lost friend while avoiding a band of “flushed pets” who hate both humans and their beloved animals.

Made by the artists behind the Despicable Me series, this film offers a fun-filled time by depicting pets as very human-like while also keeping their animal-specific personalities intact. The Secret Life of Pets provides lots of laughs while also featuring relatable, adorable characters that even the youngest members of your household will be able to giggle at.

Minions

The title Minions’ sole purpose in life is to serve the biggest, baddest badguy boss in existence, but their clumsiness makes it difficult to keep their jobs. A prequel to the hit movie Despicable Me, this story follows three brave minions who venture off to save their tribe by searching for a boss that will cherish and need them for years to come.

Minions most impressive achievement is sustaining 90 minutes of fun and story despite the constant warbling of the characters’ gibberish language. Indeed, not only was the film a success, but cemented the little yellow creatures as animation icons.

Despicable Me

There would be no Minions if not for the success of the original Despicable Me, which won audiences over with a modern style of humor, a subversive take on superhero tropes, and a hilarious leading performance by Steve Carell at the height of his comedic powers. But the movie is also a perfect family film, as the supervillain Gru (Carell) becomes a surrogate father to three daughters and finds true meaning in a suburban family unit.

 

 

Wreck-It Ralph

Poor Ralph never wanted to be a video game villain; he just wants to be accepted by his fellow game characters. Eager to prove himself more than just a villain, Ralph leaves his home game in hopes of showing that he can be a hero. His plan backfires–if he doesn’t return to his game in time, it will be unplugged and shut down forever, leaving him and all his friends without a home.

Wreck-It Ralph is a blast from the past for parents who grew up playing vintage video games during the 80s and 90s. But you don’t need an interest in Nintendo and Atari to enjoy this fantastic film, especially considering it was directed by Rich Moore, director of iconic comedy shows like Futurama and The Simpsons.

Toy Story

The original Toy Story transformed the animated film genre with its computer animation, but the impressive artistry and technology would not have captivated audiences the way it did without an, imaginative story, gut-busting one-liners, and a lively cast voiced by some of Hollywood’s top talent, including Tom Hanks and Tim Allen.

Twenty-five years later, the iconic Pixar characters Woody and Buzz Lightyear are still dominating the box office, along with all their old friends as well as new ones, including Toy Story 4’s breakout character Forky, played by recent New York Film Academy guest speaker Tony Hale.

The Incredibles

Toy Story walked so The Incredibles could run. The 2004 Pixar film depicted a family of superheroes and perfectly captured the love (and hostility) that exists between a mother, father, and their children living under a roof, whether they have superpowers or not. Every member of the family will find something to love from this action/comedy/family drama and it’s must-watch for parents and their children.

If you’re interested in studying animation and visual effects at New York Film Academy, you can find more information on our programs here.

3 Disney Renaissance Lessons on Animation

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The Disney Renaissance changed the way the world experiences animation. Of all the companies that need no introduction, Disney is perhaps at the top. Boasting one of the world’s greatest libraries of highly marketable intellectual property, Disney will no doubt continue as a household name for years to come. What can aspiring animators learn from this company’s continuing success?

There are many answers to that question, but today we’re focusing on lessons from the Disney Renaissance — a time period that led to the creation of some of the most iconic Disney films. From 1989 to 1999, Walt Disney Animation Studios was putting out hit after hit that to this day still serve as some of the best animated films of all time. In fact, many of them are receiving anticipated remakes, including a live-action version of “Beauty and the Beast.”

Below are three things both animators and the industry as a whole can learn from the team of animators responsible for the Disney Renaissance era:

1. Animation Is Competitive, and That’s a Good Thing

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It’s easy now to look back and see how successful Disney was during this period. But before the studio began their creative resurgence, they found themselves in a tough spot. Disney struggled for a while; some of their films (like “The Black Cauldron”) failed while new rivals emerged. One of these rivals was Don Bluth Productions, which was founded by an ex-Disney animator who left with 17% of the animators working on “The Fox and the Hound” at the time.

Don Bluth’s team began producing successful films like “An American Tail,” “The Land Before Time,” and “All Dogs Go to Heaven.” This put pressure on Disney to compete at the box office. Many believe the intense competitiveness with Don Bluth Productions is one of the reasons Disney pushed hard to create memorable classics. Though Don Bluth Productions closed its doors in 1995, Disney clearly benefitted from the competition thanks to the work of individual animators who clearly wanted to prove they were the best in the industry.

2. Never Settle: Instead, Do Better

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Of course, those animators we just mentioned wanted more than to simply “beat” the competition. They also strove to surpass their previous work, which is why so many films released during the Disney Renaissance period seemed to have just as much creativity and passion, if not more, than the last.

Imagine releasing “The Little Mermaid,” which earned a whopping $84 million during its initial release, and then being told to do it again — only better. The Walt Disney Animation Studios team did just that, releasing “Beauty and the Beast” two years later, only to follow that up with with “Aladdin.” The next six films of this era, which include “The Lion King” and “Mulan,” were also great box office hits. The lesson? No matter how well you do, try to do better next time.

No matter what field or industry, success can sometimes be a studio’s downfall. Pressure to repeat the same success can be devastating, but it can also push animators to new heights. As an aspiring animator, follow in the footsteps of the animators of the Disney Renaissance era and work to always do better than before, whether your last work was a success or failure.

3. Animate Because You Love It

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Even though Walt Disney had passed on decades before the Disney Renaissance era, his influence is arguably one of the reasons Disney has continued to grow. In fact, many of his principles are still applied throughout every Disney branch more than 50 years later, including his motto: “Do what you love.”

Disney himself began as someone who enjoyed drawing in his spare time. When he decided he wanted to do what he loved for a living, he had to go through many random jobs — including working as ambulance driver for the army during World War I — just to fund his passion. With a desire to draw for a living as his focus, Disney pushed ahead until he had his own animation studio. His love for animation fed his perseverance.

We’re confident that the animators during the Disney Renaissance era felt the same way. Despite growing pressure to release success after success, they simply went on doing what they loved and didn’t hold back. Now, Disney is one of the largest and most successful companies in the world. Coincidence?

What great lessons have you learned from the Disney Renaissance? Let us know in the comments below!