Editor

6 Tips for Working With an Editor

As a director, you may have trouble putting your baby in another’s hands. Perhaps you’ve been thinking about your project for years. But working with an editor will be a vital part of being a professional filmmaker, and learning how an editor works can help your film be its best. Here we offer six tips for establishing a relationship with the person who holds the keys to turning your countless hours of hard-earned footage into a film.

  1. Choose your editor wisely.

You will likely be spending a lot of time with your editor, and there may be tense moments of disagreement, so be sure you choose one you like! It’s important that you get along as well as respect their work. As quoted in this MovieMaker article, Michelle Morgan (L.A. Times) gives this important bit of wisdom: “You should never hire an editor that you don’t want to sit and have a beer with.”

  1. Let your editor do her job.

Perhaps the biggest mistake a director can make is to micromanage the editing process. Besides the fact that you’ll be stepping on the toes of your editor, who is an artist in her own right, you’ll be less likely to allow for the objectivity of a person who has come to the project relatively late, and who can look at it with fresh eyes.

  1. Learn how to edit.

This may sound contradictory to the above, but learning what’s possible in the editing process can help you avoid missteps. “I love working with directors who have an understanding of editing,” editor Joi McMillon told MovieMaker, “because I feel like a lot of times when they ask me to do something, and I say, ‘I would love to do that but you don’t necessarily have the material to make that happen,’ they understand.”

  1. Give your editor a room of her own.

Having a quiet room of one’s own is crucial to the creative process, and this is particularly true for your editor. Perhaps this is your first film and super low budget, but packing your editor into a space with lots of distractions is going to hinder her work.

  1. Remember the editor is there to serve the story too.

If you find yourself constantly doubting your editor and question her decisions, it may help to remember that she is also there to serve the story. You did not bring her on board to be an automaton, but as a skilled artist who can serve your story best if she is allowed to work with some degree of freedom.

  1. Give postproduction room to breathe.

Rushing the postproduction process will likely cause thoughtless decisions to impact your film. As The 6 Stages of Editing as a Film Director hints, “Never be afraid to let the first cut ‘rest’ for a few days so everyone involved can see it with fresh eyes.”

Filmmaking is a stressful, deadline-driven business, but you will do your film a disservice if you do not allow a little breathing room, so that you and your editor are not forced to make snap decisions that you’ll regret when you see the finished product on a big screen, with an audience to witness!

Jobs in the Entertainment Industry That Don’t Get As Much Credit

When you think of the entertainment industry, the first thing that comes to mind are the glamorous actors and actresses that bring characters to life. But a movie or television series requires a team of collaborators and a lot of behind-the-scenes effort that doesn’t tend to get a lot of attention in the spotlight.

pexels-photo-275200

There are so many components going on behind the scenes to complete a project, and several stages that occur before a movie or television show can be released to an audience. Many jobs in the entertainment industry are less known or don’t get as much credit, and at the New York Film Academy, we feel these artists deserve credit where credit is due for their integral role in the process of creating a film or television program.

Below, we’ve outlined some behind-the-scenes jobs and the people who help see the project through to the end.

Casting Director

pexels-photo-515169

The production company or corporate client hires a casting director to organize and facilitate the casting of all the roles for a film. The casting director will work closely with the director and producer under the vision of the film, and its needs, and requirements before moving forward with interviews and auditions. The casting director draws on their network of artists to help make connections between a production and prospective performers, providing the producers and director with viable choices for roles.

After interviews and auditions occur, the casting director meets with the director and the producer to help make final selections for roles. Notable casting directors include Kerry Barden, Randi Hiller, Ellen Lewis, John Papsidera, and Ellen Chenoweth.

Camera Operator

video-943568_1280

 

A camera operator usually works with the director of photography to manage the technological aspects of creating shot composition and development. An operator starts work at the end of pre-production, and assesses details such as performance, art direction, lighting, composition and camera movement to create film sequences.

The camera operator oversees other roles in the camera department, including first assistant camera, second assistant camera, and the camera trainee. Once shots have been blocked off, the camera operator works with the director of photography to determine the position of the camera, and how the camera’s position will affect the director and grip’s workload.

The Society of Camera Operators’ 2017 Lifetime Achievement Awards has recognized outstanding camera operators, including: Mike Moad, Mobile Camera Platform Operator Award; Brad Hurndell, SHOTOVER, and Phil Saad, That Cat, Technical Achievement Award; Phillip Caruso, Still Photographer Award; Michael Keaton, Governors Award; Bobby Mancuso, Camera Technician Award; Dr. Thomas C. Lee, CHLA Vision Center; Andrew Mitchell, COY TV; Ari Robbins, COY Film; and Garrett Brown, Camera Operator Award.

Film Editor

A film editor, also known as a picture editor, takes raw footage of the film and combines them into sequences to create the finished film. The film editor must collaborate with cinematographers and sound editors to combine sight and sound. The editor spends hours looking at raw footage and must assemble the film a half-second at a time, while keeping deadlines in mind.

Film editor Walter Murch in 2005 told National Public Radio that, “I like to think this is sort of a cross between a short-order cook and a brain surgeon. Sometimes you’re doing incredibly delicate things. Two frames different will mean whether the film is a success or not…”

Verna Fields, Anne V. Coates, Robert Wise, Walter Murch, and Dede Allen are just a few respectable film editors in Hollywood.

Composer

hand-music-musician-compose

A composer creates music – also known as musical accompaniment — for the film. Through music, speech, and action, the composer can create and set a mood for a specific scene, or the entire movie. Film music composers must come to an agreement with movie directors – music must be written to match a certain tone of a scene. Once an agreement has been met, scores are fleshed out, musicians are hired, and recordings are made.

Alex Ross, a contributing writer for The New Yorker, wrote, “… when a film composer hits a sufficient vein of inspiration, the images are charged with a feeling of newness, of unprecedented action … the injection of ‘live’ sound gives us the feeling that we have been kicked into the present moment, as the best film music invariably does.”

Well known composers include John Williams, Howard Shore, Hans Zimmer, James N. Howard, Jerry Goldsmith, James Homer, and Danny Elfman.

Let’s take a moment to appreciate all of the hard work behind the scenes that goes into making a movie or television series. The entertainment industry wouldn’t be as successful as it is today without all of the incredibly talented and hardworking professionals that make film and television come to life.