The Backlot

The 5 Best Film Podcasts to Listen to in 2018

Podcasts have been popular for quite some time, and statistics show that the popularity of podcasts isn’t slowing down any time soon. According to Nielsen in 2017, 15 percent of Americans listened to podcasts weekly — up from 13 percent in 2016!

Most podcasts are free, and there are several apps that you can use to subscribe and access your faves across all platforms — whether you are using a tablet, laptop, or mobile device.

There are so many topics available through podcasts. The list is endless, and it can be hard to find the right one for you. If you love films, screenwriting, or entertainment and Hollywood in general, we have compiled a list of five of the very best podcasts to listen to this year. We did all the hard work, so it’s time to kick back, relax, and listen to some podcasts.

The Backlot

Did you know that the New York Film Academy has its own podcast series?

NYFA’s The Backlot will inspire you by providing the artistic vision and technical knowledge that you need to have to be successful in filmmaking.

The weekly podcast features a different guest who will share knowledge, provide valuable advice, and discuss varying perspectives that relate to the world of filmmaking.      

Listen to The Backlot here.

Scandalously

If you are looking for a podcast series that offers honest movie reviews, listen to Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo’s British podcast, Scandalously.

The series airs Friday afternoons on Radio 5Live — if you are busy at work and can’t listen to it live, you can listen to it later. Kermode and Mayo discuss each week’s new releases and provide quality movie commentary.

Listen to Scandalously here.

The Faculty of Horror

Are you an avid fan of horror movies? If you love the genre, Andrea Subissati and Alexandra West’s podcast series, The Faculty of Horror, is just for you. Subissati and West analyze the creepy classics, what makes horror films tick, and what society has to say about horror films.

Listen to The Faculty of Horror here.  

You Must Remember This


If you are ever in the mood to reminisce about the crimes of Tinsel Town, take a listen to You Must Remember This.

Host Karina Longworth delves into Hollywood’s history and focuses on crimes like the murder of Johnny Stompanato, boyfriend of femme fatale Lana Turner.

Listen to You Must Remember This here.

How Did This Get Made?


Have you ever watched a movie and wondered how it ever got greenlit?

The podcast discusses cult classics like Nicolas Cage’s The Wicker Man, and the components that take a movie bad or make it great. Paul Scheer, June Diane Raphael, and Jason Mantzoukas bring you the results of some of the most famous movie bombs in this podcast series.

Listen to How Did This Get Made? here.   

Have you listened to any of these podcasts? We would love to hear what you think about them! Do you have a favorite podcast that didn’t make our list? Sound off below!

Trends in Journalism to Watch Out for in 2018

Innovations, whether you’re talking about television or the internet, have continued to change how the average person discovers news. And no matter where you look, technology still doesn’t show signs of slowing down. Here are the four biggest journalism trends this year that we consider to be at the top of the list:

Offline But Not Disconnected


There’s no denying the power the internet has when it comes to keeping people informed and connected. In this day and age, it’s far more likely to learn about a current event via a WiFi-connected mobile device such as a tablet or smartphone. Tech companies everywhere are enjoying the benefit of features such as push notifications that keep their readers engaged and wary of their latest information.

But what about when they can’t count on their internet connection? Sooner or later, people find themselves in an area or building where Wi-Fi either doesn’t work or runs too slow. According to The Reuters Institute’s Digital News Report 2017, apps are making a comeback, which means we are seeing news organizations putting more focus on their offline content in order to keep consumers with unreliable internet happy.

Podcasts Continue Their Rise

Journalists and media companies know full well that text and video alone are not enough these days. Many consumers find themselves preferring content that they don’t have to read or see — all you need is a pair of ears. Much like the times of old when radios were the go-to place for news, plenty of folks today want audio news sources they can listen to while driving, working, etc.

In another survey done by Reuters Institute involving 194 leading editors, digital leaders, and CEOs, it was discovered that 58 percent of publishers plan to focus more on podcasts. The same amount will also put more effort into creating content for voice activated speakers.

More Focus on Social Media, but not Everywhere

Even a decade ago when MySpace ruled the social networking world, few could have predicted the power of social media sites in the hands of journalists. More people than ever —  especially in U.S. — prefer taking to Twitter and Facebook to get their news for the day. According to the Reuters Institute survey, the number of American that prefer social media for news has doubled since 2013.

However, trends aren’t quite going the same way elsewhere. Across all the countries surveyed, only about a third of people between the ages of 18 and 24 have social media as #1 on their list. While growth has ceased in the United Kingdom, places like Italy, Brazil, Australia and Portugal are actually seeing a decline.

A Push for Artificial Intelligence

When most people think about artificial intelligence (AI) they imagine robots that can help us with our daily chores before inevitably turning against us once Skynet becomes self-aware. While not as exciting as our favorite sci-fi movies, the use of artificial intelligence in the journalism industry is expected to make a big impact soon. This is why 72 percent of of the top digital leaders and editors plan to start experimenting with AI.

Why would journalists have need for artificial intelligence? According to surveys, 59 percent think AI can improve content recommendations while also detecting intentional media bias. Other uses include using AI. to help automate workflows, improve commercial optimisation, and help journalists find stories.

What are your predictions for the next biggest trends in journalism? Let us know in the comments below, and learn more about broadcast journalism at New York Film Academy.