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NYFA Drug-Free School Policy

NYFA Drug and Alcohol Policy for Students


New York Film Academy is committed to providing and sustaining for students, faculty and staff, a safe, healthy, and supportive environment conducive to optimum professional and personal growth and development.

In compliance with this objective and in accordance with United States Department of Education Drug Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989, Public Law 101- 226, this document, distributed annually, informs students, faculty and staff of: 1) NYFA’s institutional policies and standards of conduct related to alcohol and drugs, 2) the disciplinary sanctions under NYFA conduct policies for violations of standards of conduct related to use of alcohol and drugs, 3) legal sanctions and penalties related to the alcohol and drugs based on federal, state and local laws, 4) the health risks associated with alcohol and drug use, and 5) resources for help and treatment for the treatment of substance abuse and addiction.


NYFA Standards of Conduct Related to Alcohol and Drugs



The following is strictly prohibited on NYFA premises and NYFA affiliated facilities (i.e. residence halls operated by a contracted agency) and while attending NYFA activities, events, workshops and curricula and co-curricular projects:

  • Use, possession, sale, distribution and/or manufacture of alcoholic beverages, acting as an accessory, liaison, or facilitator for any of the above, except at a time, location, and circumstance expressly permitted by NYFA and federal regulations
  • Use, possession, sale, distribution and/or manufacture of narcotics or other illicit and/or controlled substances (including medical marijuana) or acting as an accessory, liaison, or facilitator for any of the above
  • The misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs
  • Use or possession of drug-related paraphernalia
  • Being under the influence, impairment, or being unable to care for one’s own safety as pertains to use of alcohol and/or controlled substances and misuse of legal pharmaceutical drugs
  • Possession, production, or provision of false ID
  • Operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs
  • Administering drugs to individuals against their will and/or without their knowledge or consent
  • Furnishing alcohol to a person under the age of 18
  • Violating other federal, state and local laws regarding alcohol, tobacco, and controlled substances
  • The smoking of tobacco, including the use of vaporizers and e-cigarettes, in indoor locations on NYFA campuses, outdoor locations not designated as smoking areas, and in attendance of NYFA related events

NYFA Disciplinary Sanctions for Violating Standards of Conduct for Alcohol and Drugs



Students violating NYFA institutional policies and codes of conduct related to alcohol and drugs will be subject to disciplinary action. Disciplinary action(s) will be determined by the nature and severity of the behaviors in violation of the policies and conduct codes; mitigating and aggravating factors will also be considered in the determination of appropriate sanctioning. Possible sanctions for students violating the above-mentioned policies and codes of conduct include, in ascending order of severity, conduct warnings, educational trainings and/or assignments, fines, community service, parental notification, mandated off-campus substance abuse assessment, disciplinary probation, suspension, and expulsion.


Medical Amnesty Policy



NYFA values, first and foremost, the health and safety of its students. Students in medical crisis and students directly responsible for securing medical assistance to address a students’ medical crisis resulting from alcohol and/or drug abuse or misuse may be granted medical amnesty. Amnesty may eliminate or significantly mitigate sanctions associated with violations of the NFYA Student Code of Conduct in regard to drug use, sharing prescription medications, underage consumption of alcohol, and possession and distribution of alcoholic beverages.


Legal Sanctions and Penalties



Federal Laws


Alcohol: Federal law establishes 21 as the national minimum drinking age. Only persons of legal age (21 years or older) may possess or consume alcoholic beverages.

Drugs: Federal drug laws, including the Controlled Substances Act, regulate the possession, trafficking, and manufacturing of drugs. Even though states have their own laws on drugs, federal laws supersede drug laws- including those regarding the medical/recreational use of marijuana.
( Source: https://www.recovery.org/topics/guide-us-drug-laws/#federal-drug-laws

It is a criminal offense under Federal law to manufacture, distribute, dispense or possess with intent to manufacture, distribute or simply possess a controlled substance, including marijuana. The sanctions for violation of these laws depend upon the particular offense and aggravating factors, such as the type and quantity of drugs involved. Factors considered to determine both drug classifications (controlled substances are classified as schedule l to 5) and penalties include the drug’s potential for abuse, psychological and/or physiological dependence, scientific evidence regarding the drug’s pharmacologic effects, public health risks, reported incidence of widespread abuse. These sanctions include fines, assigned community service, loss of federal student financial aid eligibility and imprisonment. For a detailed description of federal trafficking penalties please refer to Appendix 1 (Source: http://www.usdoj.gov/dea/agency/penalties.htm ).

Prescription drugs are considered controlled substances. Being in possession of prescription drugs prescribed for another is a violation of federal law in exactly the same way as possession of marijuana and cocaine are violations of federal law. The unlawful of selling prescription drugs is a felony; sanctions range from fines to incarceration.

Sharing prescription drugs is also unlawful. It is a criminal offense for a parent to share prescribed medication, such as Xanax, with a child. Likewise, it is a criminal offense for a student to share (or sell) his/her own prescribed pills of Adderall with a fellow student.

NYFA recognizes federal laws over state laws in defining illegal drugs. The use, possession, sale or distribution of any schedule 1 drug, such as marijuana, on campus or at a school related activity constitutes a violation and is cause for disciplinary action. Schedule 1 drugs include, but are not limited to: marijuana, MDMA, heroin, psilocybin, and GHB.

F1/M1 International Students: An international student arrested for an alcohol or drug related crime risks having his/her visa revoked. In most instances, an international student will be able to remain in the US; travel outside of the US, however, would require the student to apply for a new F1/M1 student visa to reenter the US. There is a risk the visa could be denied or the student may be required to take alcohol/drug prevention related classes before a visa is approved. An arrest may also impact a student’s application for Post-Completion Optional Practical Training. NYFA advises all international students to immediately seek advice from an immigration attorney if arrested.

Students Receiving Federal Financial Aid: If student receiving federal financial aid and, during the time of receiving federal aid, the student is convicted of violation(s) of federal or state laws related to the possession of sale of drugs, the student will be ineligible for a period of time determined by the nature and frequency of the offence. A student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends, or when he or she successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program that includes passing unannounced drug tests given by such a program. For additional and guidance, students are encouraged to consult directly with NYFA Financial Aid (financialaid@nyfa.edu).

State Laws


Alcohol – New York: The following are illegal actions, punishable as violation of NY State Law:
  • The possession of alcohol by a person under age 21 unless the minor is accompanied by a parent or guardian.
  • Purchasing, furnishing, serving alcohol to a minor. Violation of NY State Law 260.20 9d) is a class A misdemeanor punishable by a sentence of imprisonment up to one year.
  • Possession, production or provision of a false ID, punishable by a $100 fine and/or completion of an alcohol awareness program, and/or 30 hours of community service.
  • Operating a non commercial motor vehicle with a BAC level higher than 0.08; According to NY State Vehicle and Traffic Law 1192, persons drinking while intoxicated may be subject to suspension or revocation of driving privileges in the state as well as fines up to $1,000 and imprisonment up to one year.
  • It is a violation of NY State Penal Law 260.21(3) to sell tobacco products to any person under the age of 18. This is class B misdemeanor and punishable my imprisonment up to three months.
Drugs – New York: According to NY Penal Law, Article 240.40, ( Appearance in public under the influence of narcotic drugs other than alcohol), it is a violation of NY State law to appear in public under the influence of narcotic drugs other than alcohol to the degree that a person may endanger themselves or other persons or property, or annoy other persons in their vicinity; this offense is punishable by fine and imprisonment up to 15 days.

Marijuana: Penal Law Section 220; Public Health Code Sections 3306, 3307

Marijuana – Possession:
Up to 25 grams civil violation that incurs fines but no jail time.
25 grams -2 ounces up to three months in jail and/or $500 fine
2 - 8 ounces up to one year in jail and/or $1000 fine
8 – 16 ounces 1-4 years in prison and/or up to $5000 fine (mandatory prison time for second offenses)
16 ounces – 10 pounds 1-7 years in prison and/or up to $5,000 fine (mandatory prison time for second offenses)

Marijuana – Sale:
Up to two ounces without payment up to 3 mo. in jail and/or up to $500 fine
Cultivating or selling up to 24 grams up to 1 year in jail and/or up to $1,000 fine
25 grams to four ounces 1-4 years in prison and/or up to $5,000 fine
4 to 16 ounces 1-7 years in prison and/or up to $5,000 fine
Selling any amount to a minor 1-7 years in jail and/or up to $5,000 fine

All other NYS laws regarding alcohol and other drugs can be viewed on the New York State Legislature website:
http://public.leginfo.state.ny.us/menugetf.cgi?COMMONQUERY-LAWS

Alcohol – California: The following are illegal actions, punishable as violation of CA State Law:

  • The possession of alcohol by a person under age 21 unless the minor is accompanied by a parent or guardian.
  • Business and Professions Code 25658 makes it a misdemeanor in California to sell or furnish alcohol to a minor (someone under the state legal drinking age of 21). The misdemeanor penalties for this crime are up to one (1) year in county jail, and/or a fine of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000)
  • California Penal Code 470b makes it a crime to either display or possess any fake identification, with the intent to use that fake ID. The misdemeanor penalties for this crime are up to one (1) year in county jail, and/or a fine of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000). The potential felony penalties are sixteen (16) months, two (2) years or three (3) years' imprisonment, and/or a fine of up to ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
  • Operating a motor vehicle with a BAC level higher than 0.08 (21 years or older), 0.01 or higher (21 years or younger) According to CA State Vehicle and Traffic Law 1192, persons drinking while intoxicated may be subject to suspension or revocation of driving privileges in the state as well as fines up to $1,000 and imprisonment up to one year.
    • A first offense (without bodily injury) is punishable by nearly $2,000 in fines and assessments, 48 hours in jail, several months of license suspension, and completion of a three-month alcohol education program. If you commit a third or subsequent DUI offense within a 10- year period, you may be sentenced to as many as 16 months in state prison, roughly $18,000 in fines and assessments, and the requirement of a 30-month alcohol treatment program. Understanding the law will not only help you avoid committing a DUI, but also help you plan your next steps if you have been arrested for the offense.
    • The following chart lays out the basics of California DUI laws, including blood alcohol concentration (BAC) limits, penalties, and information about license suspension.
California DUI Laws: Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) Limits and Implied Consent:
"Per Se" BAC Limit 0.08 Percent
Zero Tolerance (Underage) BAC Limit 0.02 Percent
Enhanced Penalty (Aggravated) BAC Limit 0.16 Percent

California DUI Laws: Select Penalties
Minimum License Suspension or Revocation (1st, 2nd, 3rd offense) 6 months, 2 years, up to 10 years
Mandatory Alcohol Education, Assessment and Treatment Both (education if under 21)
Vehicle Confiscation Possible? Yes

Drugs – California: Below you will find key provisions of California’s drug possession laws. Statues are found in the California Health and Safety Code Division 10, Chapter 6, Sections 11350-11651 et. seq. (Uniform Controlled Substances Act).

Controlled Substances, Not Marijuana – Possession: After Prop 47, the following crimes are punished as misdemeanors only, with penalties including up to one year in the county jail, not state prison:
  • Schedule I opiates, opium derivatives, cocaine base, mescaline, peyote, or synthetic cannabis (including their isomers, esters, ethers, salts, and salts of isomers, esters, and ethers)
  • Schedule II narcotics or opiates
  • Schedule III hallucinogens, and
  • Schedule III, IV or V
Marijuana: The basics of California marijuana laws are found in the following statues, including Business & Professions Code Sections 26000, et seq.; Health & Safety Code Sections 11000, et seq.; 11357, et seq.; 11362.7, et seq.

Marijuana – Possession:
  • Possession of more than 28.5 grams of marijuana, other than concentrated cannabis, is punishable by incarceration of up to 6 months, a fine of not more than $500, or both
  • Possession of not more than 28.5 grams of marijuana, legal for those 21 and over, an infraction for those 18 and under (mandatory drug education course and community service)
  • Those 18 and over who possess more than 28.5 grams of cannabis, or more than 8 grams of concentrated cannabis may be imprisoned in county jail for up to 6 months and/or fined up to $500.
Concentrated Cannabis – Possession:
  • Possession of up to 8 grams of concentrated cannabis is legal, over 8 grams is punishable by incarceration of up to 1 year, a fine of up to $500, or both
Marijuana – Sale:
  • Sale by someone who does not possess a license to sell cannabis is a misdemeanor, which can result in up to 6 months in jail and/or fines up to $500.
  • A person who engages in commercial cannabis activity without a license will be subject to civil penalties of up to three times the amount of the license fee for each violation, with each day of operation constituting a separate violation.
Marijuana – Additional Limitations:
  • There are additional limitations to smoking and possessing marijuana even if a person is over 21. The limitations include (but are not limited to) smoking or ingesting cannabis in public, (except in accordance with § 26200 of the Business & Professions Code), smoking/ingesting while operating a vehicle, and possessing an open container while operating or riding as a passenger in a vehicle.

Alcohol – Florida:The following are illegal actions, punishable as violation of FL State Law:

  • The possession of alcohol by a person under age 21 is unlawful.
  • Florida Statutes S. 562.111 makes it a first-degree misdemeanor in Florida to sell or furnish alcohol to a minor (someone under the state legal drinking age of 21). The misdemeanor penalties for this crime are up to one (1) year in county jail, and/or a fine of up to one thousand dollars ($1,000). Second or subsequent offense, is a mandatory revocation period of two (2) years
  • Florida Statutes S. 322.212 makes it a crime to either display or possess any fake identification, with the intent to use that fake ID. The felony penalties for this crime are up to five (5) year in county jail, and/or a fine of up to one thousand dollars ($5,000). This is the current law and was amended, effective October 1, 1997.
  • Operating a motor vehicle with a BAC level higher than 0.08 (21 years or older), 0.01 or higher (21 years or younger) According to FL State Vehicle and Traffic Law 1192, persons drinking while intoxicated may be subject to suspension or revocation of driving privileges in the state as well as fines up to $1,000 and imprisonment up to one year.
Zero Tolerance for Drivers under 21: Florida has a Zero Tolerance law for drivers under 21. This means that any driver under 21 that is stopped by law enforcement and has a blood alcohol level of .02 or higher will automatically have their Florida drivers license suspended for 6 months. The .02 limit really means that you cannot have a single drink and drive. And that's the idea.

For drivers over 21 the legal limit in Florida is .08. Regardless of your age be aware that drinking and driving is considered a serious offense. Below we have summarized the penalties in the state of Florida for a first offense DUI, but the average cost including legal defense, fines, and auto insurance increases is $8000.

Minimum jail sentences for a first, second, and third DUI conviction in Florida:
  • First Offense DUI: A misdemeanor with penalties that include:
    • Up to 6 months imprisonment
    • 1 year probation (combined with imprisonment)
    • $250 to $500 fine
    • 6 months to 1 year license suspension
    • Community service (at least 50 hours)
    • Substance abuse course (DUI school)
    • Vehicle impoundment for 10 days
  • First Offense DUI, Enhanced Penalties:
    • A DUI with a BAC over .15 or accompanied by a minor in the vehicle include the above penalties with these changes:
    • Up to 9 months imprisonment
    • $1000 to $2000 fine
    • Interlock Ignition Device on all vehicles for up to 6 months
  • Second Offense DUI in More than 5 Years: A misdemeanor with penalties that include:
    • Up to 9 months imprisonment
    • Up to 1 year probation
    • $500 to $1000 fine
    • 6 months to 1 year license suspension
    • Substance abuse course (DUI school)
    • Vehicle impoundment for 10 days
    • Interlock Ignition Device on all vehicles for 1 year
Drugs – Florida: Florida Statute 893.13, et seq.

Marijuana: November 2017, Florida passed Amendment 2, or the Use of Marijuana for Debilitating Medical Conditions ballot, allowing medical marijuana to be cultivated and dispensed to qualified patients.
  • A qualifying patient must qualify with a debilitating medical condition. Conditions accepted are listed as follows:
  • Cancer, Epilepsy, Glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, PTSD, ALS, Crohn’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, Multiple Sclerosis,
  • Any other debilitating medical condition of similar nature where a physician feels marijuana would benefit the patient.
  • Any patient with a qualifying medical condition must first obtain a physician certification. A physician certification is a written document from a licensed doctor stating the validity of the patient's debilitating medical condition, the doctor’s professional opinion that marijuana use would outweigh potential health risks for the patient and the recommended duration of medical marijuana use.
  • While some other states have experimented with marijuana legalization and decriminalization, marijuana remains illegal in Florida unless being used in medicinal cases. Possession of small amounts of marijuana is a crime in the State of Florida, albeit having less than 20 grams on you is a misdemeanor. While the option of drug diversion programs may be available for some first-time offenders with no criminal history, it's still a criminal offense.
Marijuana – Possession:
  • Under 20 grams: 1st degree misdemeanor; up to 1 year jail, fine
  • Over 20 grams to 25 lbs or under 300 plants: up to 5 years jail, fine
  • In excess of 25 lbs. is trafficking (1st degree felony)

Marijuana – Sale:
  • 3rd degree felony, unless less than 20 g. for no consideration, then 1st degree misdemeanor: penalty as in §§775.082, 083, 084;
  • Subsequent offense: 15 yrs.

Marijuana – Trafficking: All sentencing done pursuant to sentencing guidelines:
  • 25-2000 lbs.: mandatory $25,000 and 3 yrs.;
  • 2000-10,000 lbs.: mandatory $50,000 and 7 yrs.;
  • Over 10,000 lbs.: 15 yrs. and mandatory $200,000

Health Risks Associated with the Misuse of Alcohol and Other Drugs



Health Risks Associated with the Misuse of Alcohol:


Drinking excessively- over time or on a single occasion- can negatively impact one’s health and wellbeing. Consuming very high doses of alcohol in the course of a defined period of time can cause respiratory depression, unconsciousness and, possibly, death. Moderate to heavy alcohol consumption over the course of a defined period of time may cause changes in cognition and behavior, such as disorientation, confusion, emotional lability, impaired judgment and coordination, and impairment in fine motor control, vision, speech, and hearing. Prolonged heavy use of alcohol can lead to physiological dependence, increased risk of certain cancers, liver disease, and death. Other consequences of alcoholism or prolonged heavy alcohol abuse are unemployment, financial loss, incarceration and other legal problems, and the dissolution of relationships with loved ones, family members and friends.

Underage drinking is associated with risky behaviors such as unsafe sexual activity, driving when under the influence, and experiencing or engaging in violent behavior. Each year, in the US, alcohol related injuries (homicide, suicide, and unintentional injury) cause 5,000 deaths among people under age 21. Also, individuals who begin drinking before age 21 increase their risk of developing alcohol use disorders. ( Source: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/health-topics/underage-drinking.page )

For all individuals, the more drinks consumed in one day and the greater number of days of moderate to heavy drinking, the greater is the risk for: accidents and injuries, committing or being the victim of acts of violence, suicide, cancers of the mouth, throat, esophagus, liver, breast and colon, hypertension, and depression, dementia and other health disorders.

More specifically, one’s physical health and functioning is jeopardized as a result of excessive drinking. Alcohol interferes with the brain’s communication pathways, causing negative changes in mood and behavior and compromising cognition and motor coordination. Excessive drinking has been linked to increased risk of cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, stroke and high blood pressure. Liver disease can also result from excessive alcohol consumption, causing steatosis or fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Alcohol causes the pancreas to produce toxic substances that can lead to pancreatitis, a condition that can be associated with life-threatening complications. (Source: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/alcohols-effects-body)

What constitutes excessive drinking and risk depends on an individual’s weight, gender, age, genetic predisposition for addictive disorders and behaviors, and various other factors. For example, lower-risk drinking limits for men are no more than 4 drinks on any day and no more than 14 drinks per week. Lower-risk drinking for women are no more than 3 drinks on any day and no more than 7 drinks per week. One drink is defined as 12 fl. oz of beer, 8-9 fl. oz of malt liquor, 5 fl oz. of wine, or a 1.5 fl oz of distilled spirits. For a more personalized assessment of individual risk related to the amount and type of alcohol consumed, the duration of time drinking, age, gender, and weight (though not incorporating variables of metabolic rate, body fat percentage, and current medications), access the Blood Alcohol Calculator by clicking on the following link: https://www.healthstatus.com/calculate/blood-alcohol-bac-calculator

That said, any amount of drinking may pose health risks for individuals who are pregnant and individuals diagnosed with hepatitis or liver disease. An alcohol-exposed pregnancy may lead to the birth of a child with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder.

Drinking alcohol when living with hepatitis or liver disease increases the risk for developing fibrosis and liver cancer. (Source: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/doh/health/health-topics/alcohol-and-drug-use-alcohol-and-health.page)

Health Risks of Alcohol and Other Drugs:

The use of illicit drugs, the misuse of prescription medication, and using drugs in combination with alcohol are associated with short and long term health consequences. The charts below (excerpted from https://www.drugabuse.gov/drugs-abuse/commonly-abused-drugs-charts published by the NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse) illustrate the health effects of commonly abused substances. For information regarding illicit and misused substances not listed below, please click on the above link.

Health Risks of Alcohol and Benzodiazepines:

Health risks associated with the combined use of Benzodiazepines (most commonly used “Benzos” are xanax, klonopin, ativan, commonly used for the treatment of anxiety) and alcohol are as follows. Because this medication acts on the same receptors as alcohol, when used in combination, the effects of both drugs are enhanced and risk increased for unpredictable effects, overdose, developing an addiction, acute physical illness.

Health Risks of Depressants (benzodiazepines, barbiturates, sleep medications ie. Xanax, Valium, Ativan, Lunesta, Ambien):

  • Short-term
    • Drowsiness, slurred speech, poor concentration, confusion, dizziness, problems with movement and memory, lowered blood pressure, slowed breathing.
  • Long-term
    • Unknown
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Sleep medications are sometimes used as date rape drugs.
    • Risk of HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases from shared needles.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Further slows heart rate and breathing, which can lead to death.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Must be discussed with a health care provider; barbiturate withdrawal can cause a serious abstinence syndrome that may even include seizures.

Health Risks of Prescription Stimulants (Adderall, Concerta, Ritalin):

  • Short-term
    • Increased alertness, attention, energy; increased blood pressure and heart rate; narrowed blood vessels; increased blood sugar; opened-up breathing passages.
  • High doses: dangerously high body temperature and irregular heartbeat; heart disease; seizures.
  • Long-term
    • Heart problems, psychosis, anger, paranoia.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Risk of HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases from shared needles.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Masks the depressant action of alcohol, increasing risk of alcohol overdose; may increase blood pressure.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Depression, tiredness, sleep problems.

Health Risks of Cocaine:

  • Short-term
    • Narrowed blood vessels; enlarged pupils; increased body temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure; headache; abdominal pain and nausea; euphoria; increased energy, alertness; insomnia, restlessness; anxiety; erratic and violent behavior, panic attacks, paranoia, psychosis; heart rhythm problems, heart attack; stroke, seizure, coma.
  • Long-term
    • Loss of sense of smell, nose bleeds, nasal damage and trouble swallowing from snorting; infection and death of bowel tissue from decreased blood flow; poor nutrition and weight loss; lung damage from smoking.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Pregnancy: premature delivery, low birth weight, deficits in self- regulation and attention in school-aged children prenatally exposed.
    • Risk of HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases from shared needles.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Greater risk of cardiac toxicity than from either drug alone.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Depression, tiredness, increased appetite, insomnia, vivid unpleasant dreams, slowed thinking and movement, restlessness.

Health Risks of Heroin:

  • Short-term
    • Euphoria; dry mouth; itching; nausea; vomiting; analgesia; slowed breathing and heart rate.
  • Long-term
    • Collapsed veins; abscesses (swollen tissue with pus); infection of the lining and valves in the heart; constipation and stomach cramps; liver or kidney disease; pneumonia.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Pregnancy: miscarriage, low birth weight, neonatal abstinence syndrome.
    • Risk of HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases from shared needles.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Dangerous slowdown of heart rate and breathing, coma, death.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps ("cold turkey").

Health Risks of Psilocybin (Mushrooms):

  • Short-term
    • Hallucinations, altered perception of time, inability to tell fantasy from reality, panic, muscle relaxation or weakness, problems with movement, enlarged pupils, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness.
  • Long-term
    • Risk of flashbacks and memory problems.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Risk of poisoning if a poisonous mushroom is accidentally used.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • May decrease the perceived effects of alcohol.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Unknown.

Health Risks of Marijuana:

  • Short-term
    • Enhanced sensory perception and euphoria followed by drowsiness/relaxation; slowed reaction time; problems with balance and coordination; increased heart rate and appetite; problems with learning and memory; anxiety.
  • Long-term
    • Mental health problems, chronic cough, frequent respiratory infections.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Youth: possible loss of IQ points when repeated use begins in adolescence.
    • Pregnancy: babies born with problems with attention, memory, and problem solving.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Increased heart rate, blood pressure; further slowing of mental processing and reaction time.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Irritability, trouble sleeping, decreased appetite, anxiety.

Health Risks of Prescription Opioids:

  • Short-term
    • Pain relief, drowsiness, nausea, constipation, euphoria, slowed breathing, death.
  • Long-term
    • Increased risk of overdose or addiction if misused.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Pregnancy: Miscarriage, low birth weight, neonatal abstinence syndrome.
    • Older adults: higher risk of accidental misuse because many older adults have multiple prescriptions, increasing the risk of drug-drug interactions, and breakdown of drugs slows with age; also, many older adults are treated with prescription medications for pain.
    • Risk of HIV, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases from shared needles.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Dangerous slowing of heart rate and breathing leading to coma or death.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea, vomiting, cold flashes with goose bumps ("cold turkey"), leg movements.

Health Risks of Synthetic Cannabinoids:

  • Short-term
    • Increased heart rate; vomiting; agitation; confusion; hallucinations, anxiety, paranoia; increased blood pressure.
  • Long-term
    • Unknown.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Use of synthetic cannabinoids has led to an increase in emergency room visits in certain areas.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Unknown.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Headaches, anxiety, depression, irritability.

Health Risks of Tobacco (cigarettes, cigars, hookahs, smokeless tobacco):

  • Short-term
    • Increased blood pressure, breathing, and heart rate.
  • Long-term
    • Greatly increased risk of cancer, especially lung cancer when smoked and oral cancers when chewed; chronic bronchitis; emphysema; heart disease; leukemia; cataracts; pneumonia.
  • Other Health-related Issues
    • Pregnancy: miscarriage, low birth weight, stillbirth, learning and behavior problems.
  • In Combination with Alcohol
    • Unknown.
  • Withdrawal Symptoms
    • Irritability, attention and sleep problems, depression, increased appetite.

Health Risks of Counterfeit Drugs:

The leading cause of death for people in America under the age of 50 is drug overdose. A significant portion of overdose deaths are a result of counterfeit drugs that have been spiked with much stronger drugs, such as Fentanyl, an opioid 25 to 40 times stronger than heroin. These fake pills may look identical to their genuine counterparts, even though they may have the wrong ingredients, additional ingredients, or contain a potentially lethal drug. Counterfeit drugs are not only found on the streets, but are often purchased through seemingly legitimate online pharmacies. If you buy pills without a prescription, you will not know what drugs or substances you are consuming.

Health Risks of Designer Drugs:

Designer drugs, such as Spice and Molly (ecstasy) are made in laboratories with chemical ingredients that vary from lab to lab. Most of the chemicals used are labeled “not for human consumption”. Often, the varying formulas used cause a different effect or reaction than what a person is expecting. For example, Spice is often marketed as “synthetic marijuana” but the chemical make up bears no resemblance to marijuana and causes an entirely different effect. Spice can increase heart rate and reduce blood flow to the heart, thus raising blood pressure. It has been linked to heart attacks and death. Individuals who use Spice may experience symptoms of withdrawal and addiction. Molly is dangerous as well due to its diverse array of toxic chemicals. It may cause a euphoric high, rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, sweating, and irregular heartbeat. These drugs may cause panic attacks and psychosis; after they wear off they may cause deep depression.


Resources for Guidance and Treatment



NYFA supports and encourages students, staff and faculty experiencing mild to severe problems related to misuse or abuse of alcohol and other drugs as soon as a problem is recognized. Early detection and intervention is correlated with positive treatment outcomes. Yet individuals with even severe and chronic substance abuse disorders can learn to healthfully manage their addiction and lead healthy, happy, and productive lives with the appropriate treatment and the ongoing support of family members, friends, and others committed to recovery.

On Campus Resources for Students in New York, Los Angeles, and South Beach:


Students – New York:
All students enrolled in New York NYFA short and long-term programs are eligible to participate in free, confidential, time limited counseling services. The NYFA School Therapist provides assessment, individual psychotherapy or referrals as needed, to an outside certified substance abuse provider or specialty treatment program.

To schedule an appointment with NYFA Counseling Services, please contact Jacky Hunt, LCSW via email, counseling@nyfa.edu.

Students – Los Angeles:
Free and confidential short-term counseling services are available to all enrolled NYFA students for a wide range of concerns such as anxiety, depression, sexual assault and abuse, addictive behavior, PTSD, anger, domestic violence, sexual and gender identity, eating concerns, homesickness, and adjustment issues.

NYFA LA Counseling Services provides free, short-term individual counseling with licensed therapists to address a range of concerns such as, one-on-one addiction counseling with an on-site addiction counselor, and referral services to psychiatry, specialty programs, and long term counseling. In addition, NYFA LA Counseling Services offers a weekly Stress and Anxiety Group, LGBTQ Group, and a Women’s Sexual Assault Survivor Group. Counseling Services also provides weekly meditation classes for students and faculty/staff.

To schedule an appointment with Counseling Services, please email jackie.rabinowitz@nyfa.edu or kathia.rabelo@nyfa.edu. For addiction counseling, please contact susan.bowling@nyfa.edu.

Students – South Beach:
All students enrolled at NYFA South Beach are eligible to participate in free, confidential, time-limited counseling services. To contact the School Therapist and schedule an appointment, please email Vivina Elgueta, Ph.D at vivina.elgueta@nyfa.edu.

Off-Campus Resources for Students, Faculty and Staff:


New York:
The following link offers a comprehensive list of New York based support groups- Alcohol Anonymous, Alateen, Alanon, and Narcotics Anonymous--as well as informational resources regarding alcohol and drug related disorders and treatment options.: https://www1.nyc.gov/site/thrivelearningcenter/resources/substance-use.page

The following is a sampling of the self-help and resource organizations which are located in New York and which offer services or referral information at little or no cost.

Al-Anon
212-941-0094
http://nycalanon.org/

Alcoholics Anonymous Inter-Group
212-647-1680
http://www.nyintergroup.org/

Alcoholism Council of New York
212-252-7001
http://www.alcoholism.org/

Cocaine Anonymous
800-347-8998
http://www.ca.org/

Marijuana Anonymous (12-Step Program)
212-459-4423
http://www.ma-newyork.org/

Nar-Anon
800-984-0066
http://www.nar-anon.org

Narcotics Anonymous
212-929-6262
http://newyorkna.org/

New York – Treatment Resources for Alcohol and Other Drugs:
The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) provides services for the prevention, treatment and recovery from alcohol, drugs and /or other addictions.

For more information visit their website: http://www.oasas.ny.gov or call the toll-free OASAS HOPEline at 1-877-846-7639 to speak with a trained medical professional.

HOPEline staff can answer your questions and help you find treatment 24/7. All calls are confidential.

New York – Local Treatment Centers:
In addition, there are numerous private substance abuse treatment programs and facilities, located in New York City and New Jersey, offering a variety of alcohol and drug treatment services. Most require payment or appropriate medical insurance. Individuals are encouraged to contact their insurance providers for information regarding their substance abuse benefits as well as treatment referrals to outpatient, intensive outpatient, and inpatient services.

Integrity House
30-32 Central Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07306
https://integrityhouse.org

The Freedom Institute
212-838-0044
Programs for families, adolescents and adults
http://www.freedominstitute.org

Center for Optimal Living
370 Lexington Avenue, Suite 500, NY, NY 10017
212-213-8905
http://centerforoptimalliving.com

The Phoenix House
Comprehensive treatment options for families, adults and adolescents
Accepts Medicaid
1-888-671-9392
https://www.phoenixhouse.org/locations/new-york/

Addiction Institute of Mount Sinai
Detox, Rehabilitation, Outpatient services
Multiple locations
http://icahn.mssm.edu/research/addiction-institute/about

New York – Treatment Resources for Veterans:
Steven A. Cohen Military Family Clinic At NYU Langone
855-698-4677
https://nyulangone.org/conditions/areas-of-expertise/mental-behavioral-health

Manhattan Vet Center
32 Broadway, Suite 200
New York, NY 10004
212-951-6866

New York – Telephone Resources/24 Hour Hotlines:
NYC Well: 1-888-NYC-WELL OR 1.888.692.9355

Free, confidential 24/7 help for stress, depression, anxiety, and alcohol and drug misuse. https://nycwell.cityofnewyork.us/en/

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline
  • Also known as, the Treatment Referral Routing Service, this Helpline provides 24- hour free and confidential treatment referral and information about mental and/or substance use disorders, prevention, and recovery in English and Spanish
Veterans Crisis Line
1-800-273-TALK (8255)
www.veteranscrisisline.net

Los Angeles:
The following links offer a list of national and international self-help support groups located in Los Angeles, as well as informational resources regarding alcohol and drug related disorders, offered at no cost.

Alcoholics Anonymous
A.A. is a self-help fellowship of people who gather in meetings to offer mutual support to others who have problems with alcohol use/dependence. To learn more, or to find a meeting: https://www.aa.org/pages/en_US/find-aa-resources

Narcotics Anonymous
N.A. is a self-help fellowship of people who gather in meetings to offer mutual support to others who have problems with drug use/dependence. To learn more, or to find a meeting: https://www.na.org/meetingsearch/index.php

Refuge Recovery
Refuge Recovery follows a Buddhist-oriented path to recovery for people who are using/dependent on substances. To learn more, or to find a meeting:
https://refugerecovery.org

SMART Recovery Meetings:
SMART Recovery offers addiction recovery support groups facilitated by a trained professional. To learn more, or to find a meeting: https://www.smartrecovery.org

Los Angeles – Local Treatment Centers:
In addition, there are numerous private substance abuse treatment programs and facilities, located in Los Angeles, offering a variety of alcohol and drug treatment services. Most require payment or appropriate medical insurance. Individuals are encouraged to contact their insurance providers for information regarding their substance abuse benefits (also known as, behavioral health benefits) as well as treatment referrals to outpatient, intensive outpatient, and inpatient services.

SAMHSA (Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration) Treatment Locator:
https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov/

MediCal Treatment Locator:
http://sapccis.ph.lacounty.gov/SBAT/

Los Angeles – Veterans Resources:
Veterans Alcohol and Drug Dependence Rehabilitation Program
https://www.benefits.gov/benefit/307
https://www.mentalhealth.va.gov/res-vatreatmentprograms.asp

South Beach (Miami):
The following links offer a list of national and international self-help support groups located in the South Beach (Miami) area, as well as informational resources regarding alcohol and drug related disorders.

Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation by State (DRS)
1-800-304-2219
https://www.addicted.org/miami-addiction-services-treatment.html
Call center offering assistance locating substance abuse services, detox services as well as insurance based providers in the state of Florida.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline: 1-800-662-HELP (4357) or www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline

South Beach – Local Treatment Centers:
In addition, there are numerous private substance abuse treatment programs and facilities, located in South Beach, offering a variety of alcohol and drug treatment services. Options may require payment or appropriate medical insurance. Individuals are encouraged to contact their insurance providers for information regarding their substance abuse benefits (also known as, behavioral health benefits) as well as treatment referrals to outpatient, intensive outpatient, and inpatient services.

Miami Beach Holistic Addiction Treatment Center
309 23rd Street, Suite 200
Miami Beach, 33139
(888) 909-3123
http://www.mbhatc.com

Summer House Detox Center
13550 Memorial Highway
Miami, FL 33161
info@summerhousedetox.com
(800) 719-1090

Adaptive Center
1411 Coral Way
Miami, Florida 33145
(305) 400-9908
(888) 448-4467

South Beach – Veterans Resources:
Veteran Affairs Miami Medical Center
Outpatient Substance Abuse Clinic OSAC
1492 West Flagler street
Miami, FL 33135
(305) 541-8435

Miami VA Healthcare System
Bruce W. Carter VA Medical Center
(305) 575-3214
(305) 575-7000 Ext. 3903

South Beach – Telephone Resources/24 Hour Hotlines:
Switchboard of Miami
(305) 358-4357


NYFA Drug and Alcohol Policy for Students – Appendix I







>> Download the NYFA Drug-Free School Policy as PDF
>> Download the Biennial Review of the New York Film Academy Drug and Alcohol Policy


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