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  • Cinematography Instructor Mark Sawicki Featured in ‘Deadline’ and Discusses New Book “Filming the Fantastic with Virtual Technology” Bringing Movie Magic Solutions

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    As many TV and film productions are grappling with new social distancing guidelines and reassessing working with extras for crowd scenes, New York Film Academy Cinematography instructor for NYFA’s Los Angeles campus, Mark Sawicki, says VFX is here to help.

    Sawicki is a Clio-winning VFX and opticals artist, who has worked on incredible titles from The Dark Knight Rises and Bullet to the Head, to Tropic Thunder, 3:10 to Yuma and X-Men, among several others. Recently featured in Deadline, Sawicki shared how productions will increasingly begin to look to VFX to solve the challenging situations for making safer productions and creating scenes with crowds where multiple extras on set are typically needed.  

    Courtesy of Mark Sawicki

    Using examples from titles like Casanova, Dracula, Gladiator, Pan Am, the Lord of The Rings trilogy, and more, Sawicki explains different VFX and even practical effects that can make movie magic for keeping sets safer. He also elaborated that background actors are still integral to filmmaking, but safety will need to take precedent. “I think background actors are very important. You know, this is a moving target as we’re adapting.”

    Sawicki is the co-author with Juniko Moody of the recently released book Filming the Fantastic With Virtual Technology: Filmmaking on the Digital Backlot. Like his interview with Deadline explains, Sawicki and Moody outline some of the most ambitious evolutions in digital effects in filmmaking and the new and exciting developments in digital cinematography with their new book, ultimately providing solutions for how VFX can help solve many of the challenges arising as crews look to return to work on COVID-safe sets.

    To read the full article on Deadline, click here. Sawicki’s book has recently been released and is now available on Amazon and Kindle. 

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    November 11, 2020 • 3D Animation, Cinematography, Entertainment News, Faculty Highlights • Views: 485

  • NYFA Los Angeles Cinematography Students Adapt to New Hybrid Model in Creative Stage Lighting Workshop

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    As the COVID-19 pandemic lingers, New York Film Academy continues to show how its adapting to delivering an applied arts education. The Cinematography department on the Los Angeles campus has taken an updated approach to the “Stage Lighting Workshop” course using practical components integrated with remote instruction.

    Production design instructor Francis Pezza created a set for a modern urban apartment to be built on Stage 5 at TBS Studios (former home of NBC), down the hall from the famous soundstage where Johnny Carson hosted The Tonight Show.

    The apartment design features a spacious floor plan that incorporates a living room, kitchen, and bedroom. The layout allows students a great degree of flexibility in designing shots and creating a variety of lighting schemes. Additionally, the set features a large window that looks out onto a 50-foot translight backing of the New York City skyline. The backing can be lit for either day or night, and allows the Cinematography students to incorporate a greater sense of depth and dimension in their photography.

    Following the set build, department chair Anthony Richmond ASC, BSC and Cinematography instructor Jacek Laskus, ASC, PSC began their workshops with the MFA and One-Year Cinematography students. Each student is instructed to choose a reference image, which will first be analyzed by the class, and then used as inspiration in creating a new shot and lighting setup.

    The instructors and the students worked remotely, relaying their instructions to a group of TA’s on set, who followed the students’ directions, placing and shaping the lights as instructed, and executing the cinematographer’s vision for the shot. The students were encouraged to incorporate camera movement into their visual design, utilizing the available space to best effect.

    Throughout the workshop, the students learned new techniques for lighting, shot design, and moving the camera. This hybrid model of remote instruction with practical elements proved successful in delivering the goals of the workshop.

    Reflecting on the class, Richmond said:

    “I was pleased with the success of this workshop. Working remotely proved very effective. I was with the students on Zoom, where we could all see each other, and the image from the Red camera as the students lit the set. We had additional cameras showing us what was happening on set, including a bird’s eye view of the entire stage. The crew worked well together, and the students were able to accomplish many unique shots.”

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  • NYFA Los Angeles Holds Virtual Graduation Celebration for Summer 2020 Graduates

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    On September 12, NYFA’s Los Angeles campus of the New York Film Academy saw 238 students turn into graduates as they held a virtual commencement ceremony for former NYFA students to collect their degrees and officially becoming alumni of NYFA.

    Director, producer and screenwriter Bill Duke recorded a special message to NYFA students encouraging them to use this unique time in history to use their gifts and work together as a community after graduation. NYFA Los Angeles also introduced its first student speaker Maya Maria Riquelme Balmaceda (MFA Filmmaking), who addressed her peers on this milestone achievement. Students also were shown a graduation video that was streamed during the ceremony.

    Graduating Class of 2020

    1-Year Acting for Film
    Ugwumsinachi Adeife Adeniran, Kimberly Campbell, Leticia Carminati, Caleb Jon Robert Cash, Giovanna de Oliveira Carvalho, Tyler Erart Ebanks, Taiga Hironaka, Neha  Jauhar, Kunyarat Karnchanasej, Melisa Lopez, Dylan Marcus Lorenzo, Luca Marcelino, Astrid Nutta Lilli Morberg, Maria Alejandra Ordonez Ramirez, Bruna G Portugal Martins, Maria Fernanda Rico Sapien, Kassandra Valenzuela, Anuschka van Lent, America Vasquez, Matthew Martin Vey, Braxton DeMarco Wells, Spencer Whitlock, Giovanna Xavier

    1-Year Photography
    Daniel John Phillips, Alejandra Andrea Sone

    1-Year Animation
    Shaela Payne

    1-Year Cinematography
    Omkar Avinash Gharat, Gaurav Hemant Jain, Jianyu Li, Piyush Thoravat

    1-Year Filmmaking
    Jason Aguirre, Mohamed Alsalman, Rodrigo Gomez, Albina Kim, Eva Zehan Liu, Joshua Long-Ellis, Chit Ho Ng, Christopher Perez, Roy Shellef – Sleptzoff, Daniel Karl Martin Sundler, Joshua Michael Wallace, Wanqi Zhang

    1-Year Producing
    Olga Beres, Sara Bothe, Fangda Du, Kexian Li, Rinati Rokach, Sai Praseedha Uppalapati

    1-Year Screenwriting
    Marika Anna Lena Folkesson, Madhav Goyal, Islambek Kaliyekov, Thomas Ralf Kirschner, William Mellon, Gabriela Ono, Mercedes Shaw, Alejandra Toledano

    AFA Acting for Film
    Shuting Li, Kalen Blaine Massengill, Padge James Mattaliano,  Ryan A. Payne, Jarren Terrell Weaver

    BFA Acting for Film
    Nellie Bislamyan, Tullia Ferraro, Megan Elizabeth Galloway, Leonid V. Formaziuk, Kayla Greyling, Tyler Hampton, Lara Heine, Marina Kofman, Xinyao Huang, Dannae Hunter, Cody Mango, Allyson Ledford, Ju Li, Ruiqi Liu, Alexandra Victoria Moreno-Banovich, Laura Pannier, Megan Perreault, Sara Sedran, Haoning Yang, Nestor Jairo Sierra, Shelby Sporl, Alexandra Stepanova, Yunxi Zhang, Alexandra Maria Roth-Rosenthal, Joshua Samuel Flashman, Farida Mohamed Abdel Meguid Mohamed Abdel Aziz, Ahsan Siddiqui,

    BFA Filmmaking
    Matthew DiGiaimo, Friedrich Frauendorf, Leandro Gualdi Farina, Shiyin Nan, Ainur Abilkaiyr, Joshua Adeyeye, Selbi Jumayeva, Ting Jiang, Anton Kristensen, Natalie Pluto, Gabriel Ramirez, Avery Stanislaw, Hyejin Sunwoo, Torey Thompson, Nicolo Azzaro,  Brett Cameron Belanger, Dexter Brown, Yili Cai, Ricardo Castillo, Shuqin Chen, Iván Colón Arroyo, Drake Dalgleish, Linyi Lan, Destinee Easley, Alexander K. Figueroa Hooper, Elisa Fowler, Carol-Lyn Garcia,  Jaquelin Garza, Maria Valentina Gomez, Brian Grobmeier, Sohail Sanjeev Grover, Praveen Gunasekaran, Sean Hale, Yuduan He, Walter Hermosa Jr., Haowen Hsu, Hei Long Hung, Jin Jia, Roujun Lu, Kristina Kim, Brendan Kimmet, Brendan Miske, Jihyeon Lee, Kaiyi Niu, Yuen Yan Leung, Jordan Lewin, Ashton Arthur Shemet, Javier Lopez, Yutong Zhu, Bin Luo, William Giminaro, Saumya Mohta, Valeriya Mashynets, Seojin Park, Dominique Pembleton, Bryce Powell, Mia Redwine, Pablo Sanchez, Wiktoria, Wozniak, Rui Yao, Zizhao Yu, Yue Yu, Changyi Yu, Yunfei Zhou

    BFA Screenwriting
    Jonathan Cribas, Andria Dawson, Sharon Lovell, Douglas Rich, Lana van Beek

    BFA Game Design
    Jason Khoury, Perry Sharp

    BFA Photography
    Onyenaturuchi Joeann Ogbonnaya

    MFA Animation
    Kaiyuan Zhou

    MFA Cinematography
    Zijian Han, Zixun  Jin, Zhuangzi Liu, Jiayi Sun, Darko Mohammed, Mayur Patankar, Nishanth Shri Shiva Prabakaran, Yaxu  Xing, Mervyn Titus, Oskar Urbaniak, Juan Valencia IV, Meng Zhang

    MA Film and Media Production
    Ruijing Chen, Harsh Bhatia, Byrrh Barry Lovon Bryant, Xinqi Guo, Joseph Deeks, Tian Lan, Siyu Song, Sneha Sunil Menon, Jingnan Yang, Imani Williams-Sparks, Jing-Hsuan Wu, Hanxiao Zhang, Siming Zhu

    MA Producing
    Muyin Tang, Noemi Durivou, Katchusca Gonzales Lopes, Xuejiao (Scorpio) Liu, Valeriia Nikulina, Ramona Pojoga, Paphitchaya Suesat, Zhirui Wang, King Wong, Yiming Zhao

    MFA Documentary Filmmaking
    Kari McGuire, Khalila Yuniarto Suprapto

    MFA Filmmaking
    Jessica Ackerson, Eric Alt, Yufan Chai, Linzhou Dai, Wanxin Ding, Nanshan Guo, Mohamed Hammad, Xiaotian Hou, Tianqi Ji, Jason Jones, Shelby Jones, Kai Shiuan Lai, Songhuan Li,  Haocheng Li, Zhengda Lyu, Yuan Ma, LaDerrian Meredith, Jenny Mochahari, Amy Nigro, Maya Maria Riquelme Balmaceda, Meng Chan Sam, Yimeng Shao, Filippos Tsapekis, Guan Chen Wang, Yinyue Wang, Yuanhua Wang, Yukun Xing, Kunqi Yang, Yi Yang, Ainamkoz Yemzharova, Hengrui Zhang, Haoxian Zhu

    MFA Screenwriting
    Arthur Boiron, Kurt Devonshire, Selena Fitzgerald, Pierre Gilson, Katherine Gregory, Damilola Ketiku, Alexandra Talavera Mendez

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    September 17, 2020 • Community Highlights, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 65

  • NYFA 2020 Summer Teen Camps for Asia Went Virtual and Stayed Interactive

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    This year, New York Film Academy’s top-ranked summer camps went virtual and campers in countries across Asia had the opportunity to make films, learn to act, and create animations under the umbrella of knowledgeable Los Angeles campus instructors who have worked in the industry for years, in interactive live classes, from the comfort of their home!

    Campers finished hands-on projects, and socialized (virtually) with their fellow campers. In addition, NYFA’s camps team had designed after-class social activities that would occur two to three times per week to allow campers to get to know one another and just have some fun!

    NYFA’s unique Filmmaking, Acting, and 3D Animation teen courses have become a dynamic new standard in visual and performing arts distance education. During the summer of 2020, more than 40 students from China, Japan, Singapore, India and so on attended the teen camps online offered from NYFA’s Los Angeles campus, located in the heart of Hollywood.

    At their home, the campers could shoot, participate, and edit in film, acting, or animation projects using their smartphones and laptops. Students screened or displayed their final works at NYFA’s virtual graduation ceremony at the end of each program, varying from one to four weeks, along with popcorn at home and a virtual gathering of friends and family members.

    NYFA Summer Camps 2019 (On Campus)

    Danny, a camper in China, share: “I wanted to say it was one of the best experiences of my life. You run such an awesome program and I am so grateful that I got to experience this summer program at home. I would like to experience NYFA’s in-person programs soon.”

    To learn more about future programs for China or Asia time zones, please click here to learn more about our summer camp programs or contact us through WeChat: nyfabeijing
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    August 19, 2020 • China, Summer Camps • Views: 553

  • NYFA Los Angeles Instructor Colette Freedman Works on Steve Aoki’s Highly Anticipated Mozart-Inspired Musical ‘Mozart²’

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    At New York Film Academy, our instructors are working industry professionals who are constantly creating and pushing the boundaries in their industries. For NYFA Los Angeles Playwright and Features instructor Colette Freedman, she is doing just that, having recently worked as the script doctor on Steve Aoki’s highly anticipated musical Mozart² and continuing her work as a writer and an actress.

    Freedman recalls jumping into her acting and writing career after experiencing an “ah-ha moment” in a theatre company while on a play reading committee. “I was reading a script and I realized ‘I can do better’.” 

    NYFA instructor Colette Freedman

    Freedman then wrote the First to the Egg, which won a slew of awards. She also wrote the play Sister Cities, which has been produced all over the world and made into a novel and a Netflix film adaption in which Freedman also acted alongside Michelle Trachtenberg and Troian Bellisario

    ‘Serial Killer Barbie’ (Written by Colette Freedman)

    Freedman’s favorite projects she’s written include her dark comedy Serial Killer Barbie with Nickella Moschetti and another recent project with Freedman’s writing partner, Brooke Purdy, called The Last Bookstore, which gained great critical acclaim and is even receiving some film interest. 

    For the highly anticipated Mozart², Freedman shares that the process was quite collaborative when working with Steve Aoki and the entire team to bring this story to the stage. We [Freedman and Tegan Summer] write the libretto and original songs alongside composer Gregory Nabours. Steve [Aoki] and his team would then select the EDM numbers that work best for the moments we define in the script, and then it comes together to green light, arrange, and orchestrate.”

    Playwrights, as Freedman, points out, are not just there at the beginning to write the story, but are involved in the life of the musical or play from beginning to end. “ [For Mozart²] We have an amazing design team for visuals and incredible choreographers in Dwight Rhoden and Desmond Richardson with Ferly Prado,” she shares. “We steer the narrative, they steer the floor.”

    Poster for Steve Aoki’s ‘Mozart²’

    As for what she hopes audiences will get from her script and the musical overall, she hopes audiences will relate to lead character Nan and shine a light on not only her character, but “all of the women whose talent was silenced due to the patriarchy.”

    Broadway World recently announced some of the names of the talented cast, which includes: Ruby Lewis (Paramour) as Nan, Anthony Rapp (Rent, If/Then) as Salierii, and Justin Matthew Sargent (Rock of Ages, Spiderman: Turn Off The Dark) as Mozart. The musical is expected to debut in 2021 at Carnegie Hall.

    In the meantime, Freedman has this to say to students and creatives:

    “Go make art. Especially in these times. Use your voice to create. Brooke and I have a YouTube channel Midlife Mutiny, which gives inspirational tidbits and encourages you to tell your stories and share your voice. Nan Mozart didn’t have the luxury of social media to get her voice out, but you do!”

    New York Film Academy congratulates instructor, actress, and writer Colette Freedman on her recent achievement with Mozart²  and encourages everyone to stay tuned for additional information about the musical and when it will be available to the public.

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    August 17, 2020 • Faculty Highlights, Musical Theatre, Screenwriting • Views: 1282

  • NYFA Alum Screens Thesis Film ‘Loving Byron’ at New Filmmakers LA Monthly Film Event

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    A few years ago, filmmaker Deante’ Gray was staying in his mom’s  house in Houston, Texas, while recovering a torn ACL from playing football for the Houston Texans. After leaving the NFL, Deante’ took his career in a completely new direction and enrolled in the New York Film Academy’s MA in Film and Media Production program.

    This Sunday, June 28, 2020 at 12:00 p.m. PT/3:00 p.m. ET, he will be screening the results of that venture, his thesis film Loving Byron, at New Filmmakers LA’s monthly film event.

    Crickett Rumley, NYFA’s Director of Film Festivals, spoke with Deante’ as he prepared for the screening.

    Film poster for ‘Loving Byron’

    Crickett Rumley (CR)Congratulations on getting selected for New Filmmakers! Tell us about your film.

    Deante Gray (DG):  Loving Byron is about a 17-year-old boy who runs away from his problematic home with his girlfriend to live in the middle of nowhere. After finding out she’s pregnant, he has to decide how far he’s willing to go for the love of his life.

    CR: What was the inspiration?

    DG: My inspiration for making this film was my upbringing and seeing how similar a lot of me and my peers were as teenagers growing up in Houston. How a kid can be so in love, so hopeful in life, and it all being stripped away at a moment’s notice.

    Reflecting now on where I’m at in my life, it’s insane how one decision can lead people, good people, down so many different paths. I think in large part where I am in my life, is purely out of sheer luck. I wasn’t smarter than my peers, I wasn’t any more athletic, I didn’t hold a higher moral standard than any one kid growing up. I just got lucky that my collection of choices and decisions didn’t lead me to a path of potential destruction.

    Deante’ directing behind the scenes on ‘Loving Byron’

    CR: The film is beautiful, yet the circumstances very much reflect the times we live in today.  Without spoiling the story, can you talk about how Loving Byron addresses systemic racism and the Movement for Black Lives?

    DG: I think anyone with a deep understanding of systematic racism and the affect it has historically had on the Black community will be able to immediately see the tree in which these issues stem from within the community. And if that’s not enough. There’s a scene between two characters in my film — it’s probably my favorite scene I’ve ever written — that tells you verbatim what systematic racism is.

    CR: It’s a powerful scene. What was your favorite thing about directing this film?

    DG: Definitely the character exploration I went through with my actors prior to filming and also during filming. I felt in discussing with my actors why characters made certain decisions through the movie I was indirectly in my own therapy session. There would be times where I’d realize there were things about my own upbringing that I had never even considered or talked about, and I was forced to somewhat channel those deep feelings and understand them better. Not only that, but my lead is actually my best friend that I grew up with in Houston. So our connection and us knowing everything about one another only amplified the focus and care that was needed to make this film what it is.

    CR: It sounds like the process of making this film had a healing effect. It’s so cool you got to experience that with an old friend. What were other challenges you faced in making the film?

    DG: The most challenging thing was learning how to properly navigate a workable budget. I’m still fairly new to this level of filmmaking, so I don’t know very much about the places and resources to get funding for a film like this. A lot of it was me learning as I was going.

    I learned that you truly can’t be an introvert in this business. If you really want to make a film and want money for it, you have to go out there and get it for yourself.

    Still from Deante’ Gray’s thesis film ‘Loving Byron’

    CR: Just as the film is getting out there now.  Which festivals have you been in so far?

    DG: This will be Loving Byron’s fourth festival selection. Before COVID-19 happened, it was selected for the San Diego Black Film Festival, and that was a tremendous experience. It was my first time since my NYFA screening that I got to interact with audience members after the viewing of my film. It’s moving how impactful certain people can find your film to be. The Q and A’s were amazing along with all the networking events that they had for us filmmakers.

    Loving Byron also won the Remi award at WorldFest Houston International Film Festival, which unfortunately due to COVID-19 got suspended.

    CR: And now you’re in New Filmmakers LA’s monthly screening – it’s such a great local festival. What are you looking forward to this weekend?

    DG: I’m curious to see if a virtual festival can still have that communal filmmaker vibe that typical film festivals have.  A cool thing that they are doing is after the Q and A’s, they are holding random Zoom rooms of four to five people for 30 minutes or so. So it does allow you to briefly network with other filmmakers and people in the business. You never know who you might see in there!

    Still from scene in ‘Loving Byron’

    CR: Maybe someone you collaborate with in the future! But let’s go back to the past for a minute and talk about your work at NYFA. How do you think your education prepared you for a career in filmmaking?

    DG: With NYFA, and the specific master’s program I was in, it was such a loaded fast-paced learning environment. It forced me to truly eat, breathe, and live film. It provided a concrete schedule that allowed me to really maximize and take in the wealth of knowledge and on-set experience you constantly get at NYFA. I was also in class with tremendous filmmakers who knew so much already and consistently pushed their creativity. In large part I wanted to prove to myself I belonged, and I think I did.

    CR: I know you did. Do you have any special shout-outs to faculty or staff who really helped or inspired you?

    DG: I can’t thank my directing instructor David Newman enough for his critical and straightforward approach to filmmaking. His way of teaching and his stress that a director’s responsibility is not only on the set but to an audience as well has definitely stuck with me since our very first class. I also have to thank him for introducing me to the Criterion Collection one day in the library. Changed my life, ha!

    Robert Taylor, who was a screenwriting professor at NYFA during my time there, really helped shape my writing style as well. And gave me tremendous confidence to try new things and take meaningful risks within my writing. Any conversation, no matter how long or small, I always would come away just inspired to keep writing.

    And last but not least you, Crickett! I hadn’t the slightest idea of festival strategies. And since the first day I sent you my film, you’ve been nothing but supportive and helpful to all my pressing questions on the best way to get this film out there.

    Also special s/o to the workers in the library. I’m in there so much (even as a graduate) I know they get tired of me. But they always have been super helpful and nice to me.

    Deante’ behind the scenes shooting ‘Loving Byron’

    CR: Aww, my pleasure! You’ve made a wonderful film, and I’m delighted I get to help you put it out into the world. Speaking of getting out into the world, do you have any advice for recent graduates making their way into the professional world?

    DG: I’m still trying to figure this all out. It’s been undoubtedly hard, trying to stay afloat and wondering what the best route is to get in the business. I think for me, as someone who’s currently freelancing, it’s a lot about staying hungry and hustling every chance you get, while still being inspired to be creative and make things.

    I think you definitely have to have a level of persistence as you go about emailing people, meeting people and even social media. It’s something I’m not the best at. I’m still trying to be better at it. But in the same breath, I know my work ethic, and I know the quality of work I put out. So when the time does come to showcase myself to the right people, I know I’ll be ready.

    New York Film Academy would like to thank Deante’ Gray for taking the time to speak about his film Loving Byron and congratulates him on his film screening for the new Filmmakers LA monthly film event.

    Deante’ Gray’s Loving Byron will screen on Sunday, June 28, 2020, in “Shorts Program 1: Belated Spring” at 12:00 p.m. PT, with a Q &A Following at 1:45 p.m. PT.  To reserve tickets, please visit the New Filmmakers LA website
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    June 26, 2020 • Film Festivals, Film School, Filmmaking, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1737

  • New York Film Academy Produces Video Highlighting 2019 Burbank Arts Beautification Program

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA), in partnership with the City of Burbank’s Cultural Arts Commission, has produced a video highlighting the 2019 Burbank Arts Beautification Program, an art installation initiative to display original artwork on utility boxes throughout the Burbank community.

    With NYFA’s own Los Angeles campus located in the Burbank area, NYFA offered its support to the Burbank Arts Beautification Program for this local community initiative as a means to provide a glimpse at what has been accomplished so far in the community through the Program. NYFA’s video highlights the Phase 3 of the Burbank Arts Beautification Program, which focused on the utility boxes located in the media district of Burbank. These boxes were painted by talented artists, who were inspired by the theme “A World of Entertainment.” 

    A Vintage Postcard for Burbank’ by Artist Monika Petroczy

    In addition to creating the video highlighting the 2019 Burbank Arts Beautification Program, NYFA also sponsored artist Monika Petroczy, who created her box, ‘A Vintage Postcard for Burbank.’ Petroczy’s box was inspired by the classic vintage postcards from the 1950’s and included famous Burbank landmarks, activities and landscapes both classic and modern.

    NYFA sponsored artist Monika Petroczy (Left)

    This week, the City of Burbank in partnership with the Parks and Recreation Department and the Public Works Department, announced a call to all artists to participate in the Burbank Arts Utility Box Beautification Project for 2020. Various utility boxes throughout the City’s Magnolia Park District will be painted with original art inspired by the theme of “Celebrate Community.” Applications are now open and will close on Thursday, July 23, 2020 at 5:00 P.M PST.

    NYFA would like to thank the City of Burbank’s Cultural Arts Commission for being part of Burbank Arts Beautification Program and encourages artists to apply to be part of the Magnolia Park District phase of the Program. 

    To learn about previous Utility Box Beautification Projects, or to apply, click here

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    June 20, 2020 • Community Highlights, Filmmaking • Views: 1177

  • Congratulations to the Spring Class of 2020 at New York Film Academy Los Angeles (NYFA-LA)

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    The end of May was an exciting time at New York Film Academy (NYFA) for the Spring Class of 2020, where students and instructors witnessed the culmination of their hard work over multiple days of final screenings, presentations, pitches, and of course, graduation ceremonies. 

    Actor Vincent D’Oforino (Left) and Dean of Academic Advising for NYFA Los Angeles, Mike Civille (Right)

    This year, NYFA graduations, like many across the country, were held virtually with students and their families tuning in from all over the world to celebrate as NYFA graduates proudly accepted their diplomas and tossed their caps in the air.

    Guest speaker Vincent D’Onofrio joined in the commencement ceremony by delivering a speech that encouraged BFA and MFA students as they go into working more closely with the industry after graduation. He encouraged students to continue to remember what they know, but to constantly be willing to learn and grow along the way throughout their respective careers.

    New York Film Academy congratulates all of the incredible students of the class of Spring 2020 who have dedicated so much time and hard work into completing their training here. We look forward to celebrating all their wonderful achievements to come!

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  • Congratulations to the Winter Class of 2020 at New York Film Academy Los Angeles (NYFA-LA)!

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    The end of January was an exciting time at New York Film Academy (NYFA), as students and instructors witnessed the culmination of their hard work over multiple days of final screenings, presentations, pitches, and of course, graduation ceremonies. 

    Students were able to invite family, friends, and industry professionals and present their work; Filmmaking, Producing, and Acting for Film students held their final screenings at Warner Bros. Studios; Photography students had their work displayed in art galleries; Screenwriting and Producing students pitched ideas to entertainment professionals; and Game Design students presented their creations at a showcase. The excitement concluded with a full day of graduation ceremonies with family and faculty cheering on their graduates.

    The January 2020 graduation ceremony was held at the Harmony Gold Theater in West Hollywood. Throughout three ceremonies, family and friends from all over the world gathered to celebrate as NYFA graduates proudly accepted their diplomas and tossed their caps in the air.

    Guest speaker and NYFA Board Member Matthew Modine encouraged graduates to be actively present in the moment, instructing students and guests to take a deep breath, while stating, “Conscious breathing reminds us that we are alive, in the moment, and that the moment–this moment–is all there really is. No one has ever existed in the past or the future, there’s only now. You must always remember to breathe.” 


    Modine continued his commencement speech by motivating students to hone in on their creativity and open their minds, proclaiming, “Being an artist requires you to think. It demands you to reason, collaborate, and develop a worldview. Your creativity will only be as vast as your imagination. Your talent will manifest in the choices that you make.” 

    He added, “Today, you graduated from this Academy and you must now enroll in the school of thought. The cost for this next investment is simply being present and aware of each and every moment.” Modine’s message garnered a positive response from the hopeful graduates, excited to share their creativity with the world. 

    New York Film Academy congratulates all of the incredible students who have dedicated so much time and hard work into completing their training here. We look forward to celebrating all their wonderful achievements to come! 

     

    Take a look at all the images in the following links:

     

     

     

    January 2020 Graduates  

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    Mahmoud Abul Burghul

    Meshaal Al Jaser

    Sura Aldakhil

    Elton Alexander

    Khaled Algrainees

    Seda Anbarci

    Nida Arif

    Alina Averianova

    Veronica Badell

    Branden Bailey

    Ryan Barnes

    Catalina Barragan Castano

    Frederick Scott Basnight II

    Alexander Bethea

    Zhishen Bi

    Lyndsay Bianco

    Jaime Blanson

    David Bockenkamp

    Jaden Tyler Boland

    Ekaterina Bolshakova

    Trey Bond

    Cole Ryan Brewer

    Sarah Brine

    Troy Brown

    Amara Brown

    Nathaniel Bryan

    Samuel Buckner

    Zhiyin Cai

    Lissette Camacho

    Matthew Relyea Capron

    Federica Carlino

    Andrei Carmona Linhares

    Yu-Fang (Annie) Chang

    Chin-Wei Chang

    Lingjuan Chang

    Kritika Chawla

    Suimeng Chen

    Yanqing Chen

    Haolin Chen

    Yufei Chen

    Lan-Chi Chien

    Sungho Chun

    JaToris Combs

    Paige Conroy

    Alexis Cruz

    Keren Dekterov

    Brianna Dickens

    Francisca Emma Dolha

    Lialdon Donovan-Green

    Yuwei Du

    Zhiyuan Duan

    Daniel Morgan Duddy

    Murat Dugan

    India Edwards

    Theresa Katharina Eschbacher

    Jose Escorcia

    Anthony Alexander Esparza

    Boise Badilla Esquerra

    Liujin Fang

    Chloe Feller

    Aaron J. Field

    Devan Ford

    Hunter Fox

    Huanting Gao

    Daniel Garza

    Steve Grigdesby

    Haining Gu

    Abdulrahman Haddadi

    Erin Lynnette Hall

    Paiten Hamilton

    Woonyea Han

    Ziwei Han

    Wahijadeen Harrison

    Jingya He

    Skye Hendon

    Herbert Antonio Hidalgo

    Chia-Yu Hsieh

    Xuemao Hu

    Xin Huang

    Sean Jackson

    Sebastian Jaimes

    Julianna James

    Tian Jin

    Bobby LaMont Johnson II

    Senka Joti

    Shreya Karunakaram

    .

    Sanaya Gautam Khatri

    Mina Khouzam

    Shreya Kotian

    Anton Krasavin

    Brandon Lattman

    Nicholas Lehman

    Yinghao Li

    Junke Li

    Yilin Li

    Dong Huk Lim

    Doudou Lin

    Shiyu Liu

    Gong Liu

    Kameshia Logan

    Chenxin Lou

    Pedro Louis

    Yi Lu

    Gabriel Lugo

    Chi Ma

    Megan Ressa Mann

    Yasmine Mazboudi

    Jack McKeever

    Ryan Mechling

    Siyuan Miao

    Jaasir Omar Minor

    Nicolai Ndambo

    Joseph Neibich

    Rialene Nel

    Nolan Nelson

    Zhuoran Ni

    Dylan Nuttall

    Mudiwa Kennedy Simbai Nyamande

    Ashley Oge

    Romelia Osorio

    Botagoz Ospanova

    Caglan Ozdogan

    Caterina Piccardo

    Justin Piehler

    Muhammad Rehan

    Jason Dale Rhodes

    Kameron Donnel Rory

    Alexandra Maria Roth-Rosenthal

    Aaron Rowe

    Gulshan Salamli

    Sharwin Sandesh Samant

    Juan Martín Sánchez

    Brenda Serrano

    Jia Shi

    Agnes Shinozaki

    Ilan Siegal Berner

    Thorunn Sigurdardottir

    Chul Hyeon Son

    Noelle Soulier

    Cristopher Spagna

    Athena Stamakinley

    Jonathan Stroughter

    Jeremy Suarez

    Edward Suh

    Keping Sun

    Yueh-Tzu Sun

    Rongkang Sun

    Jared Swift

    Phyllis Tam

    Yuchi Tian

    Diego Toussaint

    Joaquin Trapero

    Szabina Hanna Tutor

    Rachel Vaswani

    Vitoria Mitsuyo Wada

    Jiayu Wang

    Yu-Tzu Wang

    Shiran Wang

    Joshua Weyers

    Daniel Wheatley

    Anthony White

    Banghao Xiao

    Jingrui Xin

    Zehao Xu

    Chuanzhuan Xue

    Vladyslav Yuriyovich Yaremov

    Chen Yu

    Yazeed Zailaee

    Miaoling Zhao

    Muyun Zhou

    Sainan Zhu

    Adilet Zhumabek

     

     

     

     

     

     

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    March 2, 2020 • Community Highlights, Student Life • Views: 1718

  • Sun Valley High School and New York Film Academy (NYFA) Give Students the Opportunity to Shoot Films on the Universal Studios Backlot

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    On March 21, Students from Sun Valley High School were able to attend a filmmaking workshop at the New York Film Academy-Los Angeles (NYFA-LA) that allowed them to produce short films at the highest level over the course of a single day.

    Sun Valley Backlot

    NYFA’s hands-on approach gave the students a chance to learn college- and professional-industry level practices on the Universal Studios Backlot, where students of NYFA’s conservatories, workshops, and degree programs also have the opportunity to shoot their films. Over the course of the day, the Sun Valley students were able to shoot, direct, and edit their very own short films.

    The students were broken up into teams and worked closely with NYFA instructor Steve Morris to make their films. The students had a great time and were able to enjoy a professional atmosphere created by the NYFA team that will prepare them should they ever enter the industry. The goal of the workshop especially is to inspire them to be creative and believe in themselves as creatives. 

    New York Film Academy has been partnering with Sun Valley High School for several years. The four-year educational institution is part of the Los Angeles Unified School District and has a goal to “shape young minds to be prepared for tomorrow’s challenges not only in film, but in life and give [their] students the ability to cognitively understand society and allow them the freedom to make choices for their own success.”

    Sun Valley Backlot

    Some of the Sun Valley students spoke about their films and their experience making them:

    Daniel: “One thing I like working on the backlot of Universal Studios is just seeing everything how it was back then and what it looks like now … Right now we’re working on a comedy film, where a guy is meeting up with his crush and he just has bad luck—he’s trying to get to her but he keeps having bad luck that stops him … They meet up and in the middle of the film she hits her face on a pole and that’s his bad luck happening to her. My favorite thing about working here is being able to have the experience and work with teens like me and just learn the everyday things and I just love it”.

    John: “We’re working on a film about a kid—so basically he’s supposed to tie his shoe but he can never tie his shoe because there’s always something distracting him … He ends up seeing the guy who robs him for his shoe and gets his shoes back and that’s basically it. I’m not gonna lie—our shot was a little rough in the beginning because we had some complications, but we worked it out and discussed it and we’re just rolling with it. It’s going pretty good now and we’re almost close to finishing it. What I like most about being on the backlot is the new experience—it’s my first time being here. I’ve never seen a backlot like this before. I always wanted to work in the film industry; personally, I want to be a screenwriter, but I wouldn’t mind acting because it’s pretty cool out here.” 

    Fernanda: “I’m the director of the short film that we’re filming here on the Universal backlot and our film is basically about a girl that falls in love with this guy and they end up getting pregnant, but the guy doesn’t want the baby so he beats her and becomes really abusive and she has a miscarriage. My favorite thing about the universal backlot is we get to location scout … We don’t have time to procrastinate so everything’s really fast and fun. My favorite scene was the beating scenes because it was so intense and getting the shots and angles for that scene especially was so cool. I feel really confident with my accomplishments.”

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    April 1, 2019 • Film School, Filmmaking, Outreach • Views: 1581