Jan. 22 Updates from the New York Film Academy’s Broadcast Journalism School

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Being a journalist isn’t a 9-to-5 job. News happens when it happens, and we have to cover it. But President Donald Trump’s arrival in Washington, D.C. has made every administration that preceded it look tame. In fact, it has forced news gathering organizations — all of them, not just the “mainstream” variety — to change how they do business.

Awhile back, The New York Times posted a fascinating story on how — to steal a line from a NYC radio station — “the news watch never stops.” Given the events of this past weekend, with the U.S. government partially closed by a budget impasse, and more than a million women demonstrating around the country, I thought it would be a good time to share this article. (Click on the link, if only to see the great graphic in motion!)

The start of a new year often signals big changes, and that certainly seems to be the case with NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Grace Shao, who writes:
“Happy new year friends! All the best wishes to you in 2018! Happy to tell you all I’m moving to Shanghai … to pursue a new role with CGTN, covering the worlds fastest growing economy in one of the most vibrant metropolises!”
Grace is currently spending a lot of time shuttling between Beijing (PEK) and Shanghai (PVG or SHA). I hope she is saving up all those frequent flyer miles…
And speaking of frequent flyers, NYFA alum Gillian Kemmerer is in Davos (again) this week, covering the annual World Economic Forum for Asset TV.
And on the “news watch” over at CBS News is recent NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Lara Gato. Last Monday she reported to work at CBS’ digital news operation, where she will be working as an associate producer.
And who was assigned to instruct her on CBS policies and procedures? NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss!
Meanwhile, back on Battery Place, NYFA was one of the co-sponsors of Shanghai Film Week New York. I was honored to be chosen to participate in an Industry Panel discussion of U.S./PRC co-productions. As part of my presentation, I spoke about the three “rules” that underlie successful co-productions. One of which is, “Everything is based on relationships.”
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