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New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts

Overview of our BFA in Game Design

Our three-year Bachelor's degree in game design is for highly motivated students who would like to enter an intensive hands-on professional course of study. By completing the Bachelor's degree in three years, students:
  • Save one year of expenses.
  • Enter the field of their choice a year early.
The Academy makes this accelerated schedule possible by creating an extended academic year, allowing students to complete three full-length semesters in each calendar year. Students may also choose to complete the program in a traditional four-year time frame.

New York Film Academy BFA in Game Design program is offered at our Los Angeles Campus.

Qualified students have the option of completing course work at the New York Film Academy in New York City in a one-year non-degree program and then applying their course work to be accepted for advanced standing in the BFA Game Design degree program.

The New York Film Academy (NYFA) Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Game Design is an eight semester, conservatory-based, full-time study undergraduate program. The curriculum is designed to give prospective video game designers and storytellers all the tools they need to succeed in their chosen sector of the video game industry. The New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Design provides a creative setting in which to challenge, inspire, and perfect the talents of its student body.

GAME DESIGN DEGREE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

The educational objectives of the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Game Design are to give students an introductory education in the art and craft of professional game writing and design. Students are instructed through a strict regimen consisting of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops to excel in the creative art of game writing & design.

Overall, the first five semesters concentrate on building a baseline foundation in the art, technology, design, storytelling, and business of video games. The focus of the final three semesters is to build on that foundation and produce all the materials, both written and verbal, that the student will need to enter the game design industry, or pursue graduate work in the field. NYFA’s game design program is a liberal arts education that emphasis the same general education credits as other BFA programs. Throughout their time studying at the New York Film Academy, students will include courses in the humanities, social science, natural science, and the history of media. This creates well-rounded students whose expertise in game design is accompanied by general critical thinking and problem solving skills.

The educational objectives in the Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) in Game Design are to teach students the art and craft of game design and storytelling at the professional level. To accomplish this goal NYFA employs a curriculum of lectures, seminars, and total immersion workshops.

All Students Will:
  • Be able to deconstruct any game experience into Formal, Dramatic, and Dynamic systems.
  • Acquire the skills of game prototyping, playtesting, iteration, presentation, and collaboration.
  • Know how to prototype multiple games regardless of technical skills.
  • Know how to develop software using industry best practices, including Agile and Scrum.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN GAME DESIGN: YEAR ONE

Students gain a foundation of knowledge which they can use throughout a career in games in the courses Playcentric Design and Systems Literacy. Students work collaboratively to create working software, supported by an instructor who assists them with hands-on coding. Students are exposed to additional facets of games through courses in Narrative Design, Game Analysis, and 3D Art.

GAME DESIGN BFA: YEAR-ONE LEARNING OUTCOMES

As a result of successful completion of this year, students will develop the skills to:
  • Understand, through analysis, the key elements that make up specific video game genres (Role Playing Game, First Person Shooter, Platformer, Sports, Massively Multi-Player Online, etc.), and how they are employed effectively to create a successful game.
  • Understand the business of game publishing.
  • Master, through study, guest lectures, and practical application, the theories of game design; how to make a game fun; how to make a game entertaining; how to engage and immerse the player in a gameplay experience.
  • Understand the process of creating 3D assets and animation for video games.
  • Understand the technology involved in creating games.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN GAME DESIGN: YEAR TWO

The fourth semester of the NYFA BFA in Game Design focuses on the core educational components of our program – playable system design and Agile development. With two working digital games under their belt, and a foundational understanding of Playcentric Design, students are now challenged to stretch their new skills by designing original play mechanics. General Education classes in psychology and literature expand upon the base of study begun in the first year.

In the fifth semester, students continue to develop software collaboratively. Studies in the humanities develop skill in interpreting and understanding the human condition. Courses in science and world cultures develop students’ understanding of the diverse interpersonal and societal forces that shape people’s lives and stories.

The goal of semester six is to complete another collaborative project, which can serve as another portfolio piece. Classes in Free to Play Games and a career-oriented class in The Business of Video Games round out the term.

GAME DESIGN BFA: YEAR-TWO LEARNING OUTCOMES

Skills learned as a result of successful completion of this year include:
  • Understanding the process of creating art assets and animation for video games and how that process informs, alters and co-exists with the design and writing aspects of game development.
  • Understand the technology involved in creating games.
  • Understand the process of programming video games on all platforms – PC, console, portable, Internet, iPhone and iPad – and how that process dictates what can and cannot be achieved from a design and writing point of view.
  • Understand, through frequent Senior Faculty Review Meetings, the concepts of milestones, weekly development updates, and other notes-driven and/or schedule-oriented aspects of video game development.
  • Master the art of writing a 30+ page Game Design Wiki.
  • Master, through frequent collaboration with peers in the Game Design and other NYFA programs, the ability to work effectively in a high-pressure creative environment.

BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN GAME DESIGN: YEAR THREE

Semester seven kicks off a two-semester Collaborative Thesis Project that will generate the student’s most ambitious work yet. In semester seven, students will also take a Marketing Video Games class that teaches students about how to build buzz around their games and projects.

The final semester of the NYFA BFA in Game Design is focused on completing the Collaborative Thesis Project II, which includes a Game Design Wiki, written story materials, and polished working software.

GAME DESIGN BFA: YEAR-THREE LEARNING OUTCOMES

  • Understand, through lectures, in-class exercises, and special guests, the composition of the video game industry, the functions of the various companies, the functions of the various employees within those companies, and how games go from “blue sky” idea to finished product.
  • Master, through in-class exercises and special guests, the art of pitching a video game to developers and publishers, as well as how to effectively communicate and market the uniqueness and commerciality of a new video game concept.
  • Deliver a polished working game in collaboration with teammates.


Course Description

2D Game Design
Introduction to Game Analysis
Game Design Studio I
Playcentric Design
Introduction to 3D Art
Systems Literacy
Publishing Video Games
Usability Testing for Games
Art Direction for Game Developers
Mobile Game Design
Game Design Studio II
Level Design
History of Video Games
The Great Video Games
3D Game Design
Game Design Studio III
Narrative Design Workshop
Multiplayer Game Design
Game Design Studio IV
Business of Video Games
Free to Play Game Design
Game Design Studio V
Marketing Video Games
Collaborative Thesis I
Game Design Studio VI
Storyboarding
Collaborative Thesis II
Game Design Studio VII

2D Game Design

This course exposes students to the beginning technology of 2D games. Each student gets the experience of running her or his own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence, and JIRA expose students to state-of-the-art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree they will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Introduction to Game Analysis

The focus of this course is the study and deconstruction of video games. Student learn how to break any game down into Formal Elements, Dramatic Elements, and Dynamic Elements and become versed in the language of Playcentric Design. Students are exposed to the video game canon via study of both seminal games as well as contemporary masterpieces. Deliverables are game deconstruction presentations suitable for a student portfolio.
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Game Design Studio I

This is a companion to the 2D Game Design class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Playcentric Design

This course provides a foundation of knowledge for understanding games as playable systems. Students learn the language of Playcentric Design and practice the craft of prototyping, playtesting, and iteration in an environment independent of computers. This is to provide the student with hard skills that can be used throughout a career in games—transcendent of changing technologies.

The student will:

1) Understand Fundamental Theory – See how any game breaks down into Formal, Dramatic, and Dynamic systems. And learn how the three interrelate.

2) Learn Core Development Process – Acquire the skills of prototyping, playtesting, iteration, presentation, and collaboration. These timeless skills can be applied to all game types present and future.

3) Practice, Practice, Practice – All students prototype multiple games on paper regardless of technical skills. All students gain extensive experience critiquing and analyzing games via formal playtests with fellow students.

At the end of the course each student will have a portfolio of paper game prototypes.
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Introduction to 3D Art

This course introduces students to Autodesk’s Maya Animation, Visual Effects, and Compositing software, a robust application used throughout the video game industry for the creation of visual assets. Students learn how to optimize the Maya interface for enhanced productivity. They are introduced to polygon tools and taught polygonal modeling in a hands-on environment.

Students gain practical understanding of polygonal modeling for organic characters, and hard surface models. Students will also learn the basics of UV mapping, nurbs modeling, texturing and three-point lighting using D-map and raytrace shadows.
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Systems Literacy

This course builds upon the foundations established in the Playcentric Design course, and focuses on advanced study of system design and play mechanics. The course is workshop-focused, meaning a substantial portion of time is spent actively engaged in the paper prototyping process. Readings and lectures supplement discussions as we explore more sophisticated facets of the playable systems and user experience design. Creating system literacy is the primary goal; and everything else we do supports that aim. Students will leave the course with multiple portfolio-ready game prototypes.
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Publishing Video Games

This course provides the student with an understanding of the business of video games with a special focus on game publishing, deal structures, and product lifecycle. Students learn to see the world through the publisher’s eyes and in the process gain insight in how to plan, budget, pitch, launch, and monetize games. Students are exposed to these topics via lectures, exercises, and assignments. Students leave the course with a practical and state of the art of the game business including perspective on mobile games, console games, browser games, free to play games, and other business paradigms.
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Usability Testing for Games

Usability testing enables game developers to systematically identify and resolve issues that detract from the player experience. Students learn and practice formal usability testing using real test subjects. Students learn best practices for how to get valid (non-skewed) data and how to communicate findings to a dev team effectively.
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Art Direction for Game Developers

This course examines the role of visual design in building games. The course exposes students to the craft of the Art Director via a combination of theory and practice. Students learn basic skillset presentation (art history, color theory, composition, typography, basic digital media skills). Students learn to think about projects in terms of the constraints of technology, client needs, and end-user experience. The course covers basic UX/UI concepts. Students learn formal ideation and problem solving for visual design. Students learn to master the look and feel of an experience.
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Mobile Game Design

This course exposes students to the intermediate technology of mobile games. Each student gets the experience of running her or his own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence, and JIRA expose students to state of the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio II

This is a companion to the Mobile Game Design class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Level Design

In this class students work on paper and with level editor tools from commercial games to create high quality play experiences within existing games. Students learn and practice scripting to optimize the play experience including pacing, save points, ratio of obstacles versus power ups, and other game play concepts.
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History of Video Games

This course focuses on the rich history of digital games starting with MIT’s Spacewar from 1962 and showing how and why the medium transformed through the 1970s when Pong and Atari first had mass cultural impact—all the way through each successive era to today’s world of connected consoles, smart phones, and Google Glass.
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The Great Video Games

This course explores both the concept of games as art including opposing scholarly points of view. The artistic merits of commercial games is explored through case studies of seminal works. And the nascent field of art games is explored via a survey of the field.
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3D Game Design

This course exposes students to the intermediate technology of 3D games. Each student gets the experience of running her or his own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence, and JIRA expose students to state of the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio III

This is a companion to the 3D Game Design class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Narrative Design Workshop

This course examines the critical elements that make strong story concepts and how they can be shaped to create the foundations of great games. Students will design, narrative, game play, physical environment (world, gameplay spaces), and other key elements. Guest speakers will include veteran game designers and writers.
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Multiplayer Game Design

This course exposes students to the advanced technology of networked multiplayer games. Each student gets the experience of running her or his own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence, and JIRA expose students to state of the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio IV

This is a companion to the Multiplayer Game Design class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software – even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Business of Video Games

This course provides the students with an education in building a successful career in video games. The course educates the student about professional networking, portfolio presentation, roles in industry, career path from entry level to creative leader or business leader, and other hands-on knowledge pertinent to a professional game developer.
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Free to Play Game Design

This course exposes students to the advanced technology of free to play games. Each student gets the experience of running his or her own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence, and JIRA expose students to-state-of-the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio V

This is a companion to the Free to Play Game Design class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Marketing Video Games

This class builds on the foundation of the course Publishing Video Games with a focus on marketing. Students learn how to market their NYFA game titles—whether 2D, 3D, multiplayer, mobile, or other. Students learn the business side of marketing including how to make a marketing plan, calculate return on investment, develop data-driven reporting, conduct public relations, etc. Students learn about guerilla marketing techniques suitable to independent studios with no money. And they learn about the marketing techniques by top publishers for AAA titles.
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Collaborative Thesis I

This hands-on two-semester course exposes students to the advanced responsibility of choosing her own technology (in collaboration with teammates) for her BFA thesis project. Each student gets the experience of running his or her own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence and JIRA expose students to state of the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio VI

This is a companion to the Collaborative Thesis I class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Storyboarding

This course teaches the student how to communicate stories and ideas effectively using visual storyboarding. Students learn storyboarding best practices and practice the craft. Case studies are presented from animation, motion graphics, and interactive media. Students get hands on practice making storyboards for game concepts and formally test whether they communicate what the student intended to an audience. Students learn about rapid storyboarding using hand-drawn sketches as well as state of the art storyboarding software.
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Collaborative Thesis II

This second semester of the BFA thesis project allows students to iterate and polish their work in collaboration with teammates.

Each student gets the experience of running her own game studio in collaboration with 1-4 classmates. Students deliver a working digital game at the end of the semester. Industry standards such as Agile, Scrum, Confluence and JIRA expose students to state of the art production methods and enable teams to deliver software efficiently.

Students are supported by a technical instructor/mentor who assists with programming as an active member of their team.

Students take increasingly advanced variations of this course in the course of their degree so they will acquire more sophisticated skills each successive semester. At the end of the degree students will have a portfolio of working software projects.
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Game Design Studio VII

This is a companion to the Collaborative Thesis II class. Students work in teams to build their working digital game and receive individualized tutelage and direct coding support from their instructor. Students learn that they can produce working software—even with beginner skills in a short time. They sharpen their skills by practicing this process multiple times in the degree.
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Dates & Tuition

Fees Per Semester

Tuition: $12,253 (USD) +
Lab Fee: $543 (USD)




Location & Available Dates

For Los Angeles:
January 2017 - September 2019
September 2017 - May 2020
January 2018 - September 2020
September 2018 - May 2021



Please note: Dates and Tuition are subject to change

Faculty

  • Chris Swain Chris Swain
    Chair
    A leader in the games industry for more than 20 years, Chris built the Electronic Arts Game Innovation Lab at USC and was an adjunct, assistant, and research professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts from 1999 to 2012. He has led 20+ award-winning games and products for companies that include Disney, Microsoft, Sony, Acclaim, Activision, BBC, Discovery, Children's Television Workshop, and many others. Examples include the world's first massively multiplayer casual game, NetWits (Microsoft), the original Multiplayer Jeopardy! Online (Sony), the original Multiplayer Wheel of Fortune Online (Sony), and webRIOT (MTV). Chris speaks regularly about game innovation in the press and at events around the world. Publications include CNN, NPR, Forbes, NY Times, Wired, Chicago Tribune, Washington Post, LA Times, others. Venues include Game Developer's Conference, MIT, Harvard, SIGGRAPH, University of Tokyo, Games for Change, DARPA, Columbia University, Sorbonne, City U of Hong Kong, many others.
  • Jeremy Bernstein Jeremy Bernstein
    Instructor
    Writer / Story Editor on TNT's Leverage, Writer / Producer on games for Talkie, inXile, ITVS. Writer for EA Visceral Games, Designer many companies including USC EA Game Innovation Lab, Snap TV, Alchemic Productions, and others. MFA in Screenwriting, USC; MA Biochemistry, Wesleyen, BA Biochemistry, Wesleyen.
  • Lara Fedoroff Lara Fedoroff
    Instructor
    Lara is the founder of UX-radio, Inc. a podcast about IA, UX, and Design. The guest line-up includes well-known industry experts and the purpose of the show is to inspire, educate and share resources. With seven years of User Experience design and Information Architecture experience, Lara has a knack for balancing her business acumen with user-centered design. She is a holistic and strategic visionary, helping companies and users identify solutions for their pain points.

    Her deep knowledge of business process and strategy balanced with her creative simplicity in visual and interaction design enable her to do the work she loves for clients like UCLA, Mitsuwa Japanese Grocery Store, Audio-Digest Foundation and Wilshire Axon.
  • David Fratto David Fratto
    Instructor
    Executive Producer, BBC Worldwide; Sr. Director of Development, Scholastic Inc.; Director of Development, Vivendi Universal Games, Executive Producer, Knowledge Adventure; Education: Harvard University, BA.
  • Scott Gillies Scott Gillies
    Instructor
    Creative Director, Fourth Wall Studios; Game Designer Disney Imagineering; Designer EA Pandemic, EA Maxis; MFA in Interactive Media, USC, BA, USC.
  • Bryan Jaycox Bryan Jaycox
    Instructor
    Graduating from USC in 2010 with a M.F.A. in interactive media Bryan's experience has spanned multiple fields including design for mainstream gaming, serious games, virtual reality, wearable technology, and interactive fine arts. Bryan has been deeply involved in serious games for the past decade creating games and virtual reality simulations for the treatment of Post-traumatic stress disorder in veterans returning from Iraq, games for physical rehabilitation, and games spanning the educational sector teaching fields ranging from foreign language to neurology. In the mainstream gaming sector Bryan has worked on AAA titles for LucasArts and at Hollywood director Gore Verbinski's pioneer game studio Blind Wink games developing original IP for the Xbox console. Bryan also works in the physical design and engineering sector with his business The Build Shop. The Build Shop was founded by Bryan in November of 2011 with a desire to take specialized high tech fabrication tools needed for his own craft and make them available to the public at large at a rate everyday people can afford. This shop follows in the footsteps of the larger Maker Movement that has seen instances of shops, hackerspaces and makerspaces like this one sprouting up across the United States and abroad.
  • Thomas Lee Thomas Lee
    Instructor
    Digital Media Executive and pioneer in F2P online game business and virtual economies, managing projects and people, with ability to coordinate across a diverse set of disciplines. Extensive background in international business cultures, game licensing, and game development. Passionate about technology, content, and “games as service” on connected devices.
  • John Mahoney John Mahoney
    Instructor
    John Mahoney moved to Los Angeles to work for Disney feature Animation as a Visual Development Artist on such films as Atlantis, Treasure Planet and Emperors After working on ten Disney feature films John decided to pursue his passion as an independent film maker. Since then, John has produced over twenty short films and two independent features. He has directed numerous documentaries on such prominent people as Doug Chaing, designer of the new Star Wars films and Tyrus Wong, designer of Bambi. He taught such diverse classes as figure drawing, sculpture, film design, storyboards, stop motion animation, and character design in the United Stated as well as in Singapore and Taiwan. John has had several gallery exhibitions around the Los Angeles area, including a main show at the Pacific Asia Museum in Pasadena.
  • David Mershon David Mershon
    Instructor
    David has over ten years of experience working in the video game industry. He has held a variety of positions including artist, designer, and engineer. He was an artist in residence at the UCLA Game Lab. Companies: Artist, Rockstar Games; Artist, Sony Online Entertainment; Artist, Pandemic Studios. Education: Academy of Art University. BFA; University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts, MFA.
  • Joe Shochet Joe Shochet
    Instructor
    Joe Shochet has been developing award-winning interactive experiences for 20 years. He has a passion for designing and programming world-class games across many platforms and audiences. Previously he was Vice President of Creative at Rebel Entertainment, a division of IAC, focused on social and mobile games. Their first product was Dungeon Rampage, an award-winning, and highly rated online game played by over 12 million people worldwide. Prior to joining IAC, Joe led game development at Hangout.net, a small startup building one of the first 3D games on Facebook. His career started in 1996 at Walt Disney Imagineering R&D building virtual reality attractions for the theme parks and designing ride concepts and interactive technologies. After transitioning to Creative Director at Disney Internet Group, Joe was a lead designer and developer of several virtual worlds including the popular Toontown Online, one of the first 3D virtual worlds for children. Joe has a Computer Science degree from the University of Virginia, where his research focused on virtual reality, user interface design, and teaching programming to novices using Alice3D.
  • Colin Windmuller Colin Windmuller
    Instructor
    Colin Windmuller is a graduate of USC's Interactive Media & Games Division. He has been an instructor at New York Film Academy for a year, teaching in the Animation and Game Design departments. Before that, he has worked as a User Experience Designer and a freelance Visual Effects artist. Growing up in a digital age, he has a particular fascination with analog technology and maintains an impressive vinyl collection. His idea of art is creating whimsy through math.
  • Richard Wyckoff Richard Wyckoff
    Instructor
    Richard Wyckoff is CEO and co-founder of Reverge Labs, LLC and Reverge Studios, Inc. Since the videogame industry's breakout success in the mid 1990s, Richard has been a videogame designer and manager at industry leaders such as Electronic Arts/Pandemic Studios, Vivendi Universal, and Dreamworks Interactive. He has been a guiding force on critically-acclaimed titles such as THQ's Full Spectrum Warrior and Looking Glass Technologies' Flight Unlimited, and collaborated with creative luminaries such as Steven Spielberg and Warren Spector. Richard led Reverge Labs to ship cult hit 2D fighting game Skullgirls in 2012.
  • Ed Zobrist Ed Zobrist
    Instructor
    Entrepreneur, General Manager, consumer marketing executive, game designer/producer. Successful experience in the video game, social network game and toy industry on both a local and global basis. 20+ years of experience at increasingly senior levels in marketing and general management, founder of two game development companies, advisor to numerous entertainment focused companies. Involved with hit products totaling >$2B in sales such as Fast & Furious Facebook game (producer/designer), The Simpsons Hit ‘n Run video game (marketing), Who Wants to be a Millionaire pc game (marketing), TipTop downloadable web game from PopCap (producer/designer) and He-Man: Masters of the Universe toys (marketing, episode writer). Companies: General Manager, RockYou; President, Sierra Online; SVP Global Marketing, Vivendi Universal Games; Founder, Zono Games; Sr. Marketing Director, Mattel. Education: Columbia University, BA, University of Pennsylvania Wharton School, MBA.
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