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  • NYFA Photography Alumnus Wins Annual Rangefinder Contest

    For aspiring photographers, few moments are as exciting as finding the right venue for their work. In the case of NYFA alumni Rutvik Katuri, finding the right home for his work has happened more than once. His series”Holi Colors,” which had previously been published on the cover and as an editorial spread in the prestigious “Imirage” magazine while Katuri was still a student at the New York Film Academy, has just gone on to further success and found a home as the winner of the Rangefinder Photography Annual Contest, winning first place along with another of Katuri’s series, “Fashion Forward.”
    Rangefinder” (Rf) is more than an exciting contest. It is also an award-winning magazine, with a global audience of 111,000, and a digital imprint. In all iterations, “Rangefinder” focuses on weddings and portraits, but their annual contest offers rising photographers exposure and exciting cash prizes, providing a unique platform to expand their audience and forge new connections within the photography industry. Contest winners also receive the boon of having their work published in both the digital and print versions of “Rangefinder.”
    In addition to cash prizes, Katuri’s winning photos will be featured in the September issue of “Rangefinder,” in ’The Senior Issue’ on page 66-67, as well as being showcased at WPPI conference & Expo as well as in the online gallery. The digital version of the magazine can be seen here.
    Katuri’s same series will be featured in gallery exhibition at WPPI Conference & Expo 2018 that takes place in Las Vegas in the month of Febuary, as well as appearing as an official selection of Photoville 2017.
  • NYFA Students & Alumni to Exhibit Work at Brooklyn’s Photoville

    Photoville, the popular photo festival at Brooklyn Bridge Park, is returning for its sixth consecutive year. The event will take place between September 13-17 & 21-24 and will again include an exhibition of art taken by 23 different New York Film Academy Photography students and alumni who represent a diverse range of cultural identities around the world.


    “White is My New Green” by Nipun Nayyar

    The alumni and student work conveys a wide range of emotions and aesthetics from beauty and sensuality to pain and hardship. It also serves as an example of the variety of ways NYFA students effectively convey their photographic expression — from fine art to fashion, commercial work to photojournalism.

    Faculty at the photography school is also focused on preparing students to apply what they have learned in class and their coursework to the real world.  With the support of the faculty and their peers, our students have created a public art exhibit of exceptional freshness, quality, and breadth.

    Alongside traditional treatments of portraiture and still life, this group of artists has also experimented with abstraction, digital manipulation and a number of other possibilities. These experiences enrich their versatility and vision as they work to find their own distinct styles within the world of photography.


    “The Twins Identity” by Ana Paula Tizzi

    NYFA alumna Ana Paula Tizzi’s work was selected for the second consecutive year. “The Twins Identity” focuses on the relationship between the Brazil native’s mother and aunt, Denise and Dayse, who are identical twins. Tizzi was drawn to “our inability to distinguish, accept, and celebrate our differences.” Over the years, a certain mythology and mystery surrounded the relationship between the two, and Tizzi, a current teaching assistant at NYFA, sought to capture this.

    As an artist always striving to find personal connections and sync personal feelings with whoever she’s shooting, her close family made for ideal subjects. In many ways, Tizzi feels she has been shooting this particular series her whole life. Finding commonality was a key theme and inspiration as the artist shot “The Twins Identity” and this is brilliantly conveyed throughout each photo in the series.


    “Untitled” by Nitin Doppalapudi

    Los Angeles BFA student Nitin Doppalapudi will be showing a nature-inspired piece of Mount Everest. During a 20-day trek up and around the majestic peaks, Doppalapudi said patience was essential due to the unpredictable nature of the climate at such heights.

    “As an artist, my goal is to visually capture the essence of the environment and communicate my vision of the natural world by transporting the viewer to the destination.” The series shows clean near silhouettes of the towering peaks taken at various times throughout the course of day and night.


    “Bodily Confessions” by Natalia Rudenko

    NYFA LA 1-year MFA alumna Natasha Rudenko’s series “Bodily Confessions” explores the artist’s femininity, national identity, and gender politics as a Russian-born, white woman living in the United States.

    “Through Bodily Confessions I place myself into the feminist discourse,” the artist explains. “These images are sort of evidence of self-empowerment and of regaining control of my absence and presence, my past, my identity and my representation.”


    “Untitled” by Arthur Hylton

    NYFA 1-year student Arthur Hylton’s series is all about where the artist is mentally in the moment. “My artwork is about giving the viewer a look into the my mind as i am evolving as a person,” Hylton states.

    Opening night for Photoville will be on September 13th from 4 to 10pm. NYFA will be in container #15.

    The full list of the students and alumni exhibited:
    Nilangana Banerjee
    Juliane Buensche
    Pierre Crosby
    Karyna Dobrykava
    Nitin Doppalapudi
    Stephany Fernandez
    Pernille Brekke Hanssen
    Jon Henry
    Arthur Hylton
    Adam Kasali
    Rutvik Katuri
    Di Wu
    Qingjian Meng
    Manuela Montenegro
    Nipun Nayyar
    Natalia Rudenko
    Monika Sedziute
    Marshall Sharp
    Hanno Schatz
    Adi Tarkay
    Ana Paula Tizzi
    Huimin Zhang

    Vote for the People’s Choice Award below!

    September 6, 2017 • Photography • Views: 1929

  • Los Angeles Photography Staff and TA’s Gallery Open to NYFA Family

    The New York Film Academy is known for bringing in renowned guests and graduating excellent artists. With so many projects in constant development, it is easy to forget to stop and appreciate the final product. The Photography Department has decided to take steps toward honoring TA’s, faculty, and staff work by mounting an exhibit of recent work.

    © Kristine Tomaro, 2013

    Displayed on the second floor in the Riverside Building at the Los Angeles campus, the photos are images from 21 members of the department. The goal of the project, according to Department Chair Kean O’Brien, was to open a dialogue to students about the working professionals around them.

    The work exhibited spans several themes and genres in photography, from portraiture, landscape, and still life to conceptually focused projects. Kristine Tomaro, the Photography Department’s senior coordinator, exhibited a piece from her BFA Thesis Show, for which she used a 4×5 film camera and hand printed in a color darkroom. The work is an environmental portrait of her grandmother’ home in the aftermath of a natural disaster.

    © Lara Rossignol 2016, Model: Keira Ward for Zuri Model & Talent

    Laura Rossignol, faculty, created a series of portraits in the likeness of Frida Khalo. The work references the brilliant and historic work of the famous painter, while showcasing Rossingnol’s professional use of studio lighting and portraiture.

    If you’re in the Los Angeles area, you’re invited to come and see the exhibit while it’s up, and support the NYFA family. See the list of participating artists below. There are links to profiles and websites. Congratulations to our many talented NYFA community members!

    List of photographers in exhibition:

    Amanda Rowan

    Aaron Giesel

    Ashley French

    David Blumenkrantz

    Raymond A. Macias

    Benjamin Simpson

    Brendan Baker

    Bridget Batch

    Katerina Stratos

    Jenny Sherman

    Greg Dyro

    Thomas Locke Hobbs  

    Steven C. De La Cruz

    Lane Barden

    Mae Koo  

    Linda Lewis

    Lara Rossignol

    Kean O’Brien

    Gui Cha

    Naomi White

    Charles Owen

  • NYFA Student Documentarian Braulio Jatar Interviewed by VICE on Resistance in Venezuela

    Photo by Braulio Jatar

    There are many ways students can spend their breaks from school, but Braulio Jatar took a leave of absence from his studies in the 1-Year Documentary Filmmaking Program at the New York Film Academy to put his training to work in the field by documenting the current, violent protests in Venezuela.

    Currently, Jatar is one of a dedicated group of documentary filmmakers, journalists and photographers  who brave daily danger to be on the scene, documenting the upheaval and protests in his native Venezuela. The young filmmaker and activist’s work has caught the attention of VICE, who have spotlighted Jatar in an in-depth interview that shares some of the filmmaker’s powerful photographs.

    Photo by Braulio Jatar

    Jatar, who hails from the Venezuela’s capital of Caracas, told VICE, “I came back to Venezuela because I felt it was a very important moment in the history of my country, and, as a documentary filmmaker, it was essential that I was here.”

    Venezuela is in turmoil, with violent clashes occurring between the government of Nicolás Maduro and citizen demonstrators, who demand the president step down from power. There have been violent clashes between the police and the protesters, some resulting in casualties.

    VICE reports that Jatar wears a bulletproof vest, anti-gas mask, helmet, and press credentials daily when he leaves his home — where his father, a prominent journalist, is on house arrest.

    Photo by Horacio Siciliano

    Jatar ventures into the streets of Caracas to document what he sees and shares his photos and videos daily to his nearly 150,000 Instagram followers, providing a chilling inside glimpse into the chaotic situation in Venezuela, as it happens.

    Of recent violence and deaths, Jatar told VICE, “We need to take into account that the majority of those killed are young people between the ages of 15 and 18. Who is not saddened to learn that the young men facing the police and the National Guard, who are adults and have guns, are dying for simply demanding a better country?”

    Jatar’s VICE interview in its entirety is available here, and there is a translation function for those not fluent in Portuguese. While there, Jatar is also shooting a set of documentaries, one of which he plans to cut as his NYFA thesis when he returns from his leave.

  • NYFA Photography Department Hosts Giant Artists Guest Lecture Series

    Early this August, Jennifer Jenkins from Giant Artists gave the first of three lectures for the New York Film Academy Photography Department’s summer series. In attendance were students interested in learning more about professionalism within the industry.

    Jenkins began her career in music working with bands like Wilco and Elliot Smith. She spent 11 years managing artists, but around 2005 the future of the music industry was called into question with the advent of streaming services and illegal downloads.

    Jenkins began to look at other ways she could engage with and serve the music community. Her first love was the album cover, and soon she had created Giant and began working with photographers with a unique way of seeing the world.

    Though album photography was her passion, Jenkins revealed that advertising is Giant’s bread and butter. She explained that current trends are against the grain, and clients are looking for something they haven’t seen before. This bodes well for Giant’s artists like Emily Shur, Christaan Felber, Jessica Antola, Tom Van Schelven, and RJ Shaughnessy.

    Jenkins’ had plenty advice for students as they make their way into the working world. First, she suggested that every artist find his or her own voice. She calls this “Diversity with a single point of view.”

    Many young photographers begin as a studio assistant. Jenkins commented that many of those assistants leave with work that looks just like their former bosses, but no one will buy a copy while the original is still available. Jenkins suggests working as an assistant for just a few years.

    “Find your own team,” was another piece of advice that Jenkins emphasized to students. Photography is not a profession that can be done solo: Many clients are asking for motion graphics and GIFs. Having a trustworthy editor and graphics team will put beginners far ahead of the competition.

    Another important to-do for aspiring photographers is to have a beautiful and completed portfolio. “Make sure all of your pages are printed from the same place.” Jenkins detailed the unpleasant experience of flipping through a talented artist book when every page looks different. Clean uniformity helps the keep the viewer’s eye where it should be —  on the work. Jenkins suggested clean white paper in an 11×14 black book with a two-inch margin and no more than 70 prints. Jenkins cautioned against going the iPod route: The backlighting can be distracting and many clients like the look and feel of a book.

    Once a portfolio book is complete, photographers will be ready to start submitting their work. Jenkins attends a number of photography competitions throughout the year. Artists were encouraged to apply to and attend these competitions. She also suggested using an industry database like Agency Access to book jobs.

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Jenkins for taking the time to speak with our students. You can learn more about Giant Artists by clicking here.

     

    August 16, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Guest Speakers, Photography • Views: 841

  • NYFA Faculty Jaime Permuth Leads “Artistic Identity and Transcendence” Workshop in Guatemala

    Guatemalan photographer Jaime Permuth returned home for an immensely popular photography workshop entitled “Artistic Identity and Transcendence.” It was a homecoming for Permuth who hails from Guatemala City. He has been a member of the faculty at New York Film Academy since 2011, having taught the majority of the courses offered in the Photography program at one point or another.

    Permuth Guatemala

    Over a series of three intensive sessions, participants explored the intersection of who they are as artists and how to find the right context for their practice in the photographic marketplace. For attendees, there were two avenues of exploration. The first looked at personal and artistic identity and featured writing and visual literacy exercises along with group dynamics. The second segment was more practically focused about how to place artwork within the context of the marketplace.

    Prior to the workshop, Permuth was invited by La Fototeca – the sole photography school in Central America – to present an Artist Talk. La Fototeca was founded in 2009 and is known, in large part, to their prestigious triennial called GuatePhoto, which draws talented photographers worldwide. Jaime’s event saw over 350 people reserve seats in advance. Due to the overwhelming interest, organizers had to switch venues and hold it in the building’s parking garage instead. Clearly in popular worldwide demand, in December, the New York via Guatemala photographer will lead a workshop in Cuba for Camera Voyages. His work can currently be seen at Harlem’s El Museo del Barrio in the exhibition “nasty women / bad hombres.”

    “New York City taught me to work professionally at the highest level. But Guatemala is where I learned to see and feel the world and the life around me.  My native country is never far from my mind,” Permuth says proudly. “As a Guatemalan who has lived abroad more than half of his life – I worry that people back home have ceased to think about me. Or worse even, that I have ceased to be relevant to the cultural life of the country.  And yet, coming back to a standing-room only-crowd at my talk and a sold-out workshop reassures me that perhaps this is not the case.”

    We can confidently say it most certainly is not the case.

    Jaime Permuth Photo 2
    Over the course of his career, Permuth’s work has also been featured on NPR, TimeOut, ArtNet, FeatureShoot, and many other publications. His photography has been displayed all across New York City in the Museum of Modern Art, Queens Museum, The Brooklyn Museum, The Bronx Museum, The Museum of the City of New York, and many other museums. Along with being NYFA faculty, he teaches at the School of Visual Arts in their Digital Photography program. To learn more about Jaime and his work, check out his website.

    August 9, 2017 • Photography • Views: 1534

  • NYFA Los Angeles Hosts Special Photography Industry Guest Lecture Series

    Over the next three months, the Photography Department at the Los Angeles campus of the New York Film Academy will be hosting a guest lecture series that will welcome some of the most noteworthy houses of representation in the industry.

    Jen Jenkins from Giant House, Maren Levinson from the Redeye Reps, and Dara Siegl from iheartreps will each be giving a lecture to NYFA students.

    As a part of the New York Film Academy’s continued commitment to hands-on education and industry-centered skill building, topics of the special guest lecture series will include professional topics such as how to find the right representation, how to put together an eye-catching portfolio, and more.

    The lecture series began Friday, August 4, and will continue throughout the transition to the fall semester. Giant Artists represents Michael Schmelling and Justin Fantl. RedEye will be at the school on September 8 and iheartreps will be releasing their arrival date shortly.

    August 7, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Guest Speakers, Photography • Views: 975

  • NYFA Los Angeles Hosts Photography Industry Workshop With Capture One

    The New York Film Academy’s Los Angeles hosted a special industry workshop in partnership with Phase One.

    Manager of Educational Services Scott Niedermaier brought the Capture One software to the event to share with students. Capture One Pro 10 is a revolutionary piece of image editing software billed as the “professional choice” by Phase One.

    Of course, Phase One brought in many of their own cameras for students to use, including one with a 100 Megapixels. This is one of the sharpest images available. This is one step closer to a film look recorded on a digital media.

    Students in attendance were given the opportunity to photograph four different set-ups inside the newly acquired studio at Burbank Studios. Each set up was designed after a preferred style of a famous photographer. One such set up was designed after the work of noted head shot photographer Peter Hurley.

    Ari Lighting was used during these tests. Shadows and high contrast were the focus of the day. Students were able to learn this latest technology under the advisement of the professionals instrumental in the software’s creation.

    “This is just another way students can walk away from NYFA and be prepared to walk on to a set,” Senior Coordinator of Photography Kristine Tomaro said.

    The New York Film Academy would like to thank Phase One for taking the time to further prepare our students for a career in photography.

    August 7, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Guest Speakers, Photography • Views: 1303

  • NYFA Photography Alumna Sinem Yazici Continues Her Meteoric Rise

    NYFA photography alumna Sinem Yazici is no stranger to success. As her interview with Asli Pelit illustrates, Sinem was a successful ad agency director before the age of 30 in her homeland of Turkey. This alone is an impressive feat, not least of all because she’s a woman, but more impressive still is her decision to leave her profession and start from scratch as an aspiring photographer.

    As a NYFA photography student in New York she was able to pursue her dream of becoming a fashion photographer, proving that it’s truly never too late to pursue your dreams. Her dedication to the craft has quickly made her one of the rising stars in men’s fashion photography and while she has changed careers, her determination and success remains unmuted.

    She recently sat down with us to discuss her experience at NYFA, her passion for New York City and men’s fashion photography.

    New York Film Academy would like to congratulate Sinem and wish her continued success in her endeavors.

    Below you can find her full interview with Asli. Note: the views and opinions expressed in this interview do not necessarily reflect those of the New York Film Academy.

    New York – Studio Washington

    Interviewer: Asli Pelit    Guest: Sinem Yazici

    Asli: New York is a difficult city to be successful or to live in. To be successful is even more difficult. To leave your life behind you and start over again and even start a totally new career, which is photography that you have never done before also as a woman, how did you decide to come to New York?

    Sinem: Of course! I should tell you a little bit about my life before I answer this question. I was in the advertising business. For about 15 years I worked for a big international agency and two of the biggest companies in Turkey. When I became a director at my company I was 29. My goal had been to become a director before I turned 30 years old. After I reached my goal, I started asking myself, “Ok what is going to happen now? What is my next goal or target?” because I always set goals and targets for myself in life. When I started asking myself these questions I realized that I did not want to work in advertising anymore. I was so tired, and felt like I had been working for 30 years: never ending meetings, writing back and forth, working on the weekends. I remember that some days I was working 20 hours a day. At the time that I asked myself these questions, I already had an interest in art and photography. While I had never been the type of person to walk around with a camera everywhere I had been in the photo studio a lot and had worked with photographers because of my job in advertising. So I said to myself, “Why don’t I do this job? I would love to do this! What can I do about it?” One of my clients was a photographer. I called him my brother, Kerim Sandiman. I went to him and said “Kerim can you take me as an assistant to work for you? I don’t want money. I just want to learn what you are doing.” He said, “My dear Sinem, you have to take a class first.” So I said “ok,” and I started going to a class instructed by Muhammer Yatmaz, who is a photography teacher. I loved his classes and I had a great time. I completed two levels. I started taking pictures of my friends and family and I was enjoying it. I told myself I had to educate myself more about photography. I decided to go to NY because Advertising business was almost done for me. When I started doing this, I was up and down and I couldn’t decide what to do but I didn’t stay home and do nothing, I kept learning about photography.  I came to NY and took a program at the New York Film Academy. The program was extremely fun and for years I had been dying to live in New York City. This period in my life was fun and I made a lot of good friends.  I was stopping people in the street and telling them “ I am sorry, are you a model? Can I take your photograph?”

    Asli: Yes, it is a classic NY story.

    Sinem: I took a lot of pictures in NYC and then I went back to Turkey. I started working this time with Tamer Yilmaz, who is a professional photographer and my client. I started working as his assistant and editor. I got a chance to see the real fashion world when I worked with him. When I started taking pictures, I knew I wanted to be a fashion photographer, and mostly I wanted to photograph men’s fashion. My advertising background taught me to focus on one thing and do your best. I told myself that this was my goal, and I wanted to focus solely on being a photographer. I am really enjoying what I do. I worked one year with Tamer and slowly, slowly started missing NY and started wondering if I should go back. I decided to go back. It was a really tough decision but I told myself this, “If I do something really good in one year, I will give myself one more year, but if I cannot do anything, at the end of the year I will go back and continue my photography career in Turkey”. I came to NY on a tourist visa and I had to leave the country every six months. After the first six months, everything went very well. I realized that I had not done a portfolio because I was taking pictures of my friends and family. I started working with professional models, and while I was doing this I submitted everything that I had done and sent my photography everywhere. All of a sudden I started seeing my photos all around and set-up two or three photo shoots a week. That was unbelievable and I started to have a good network of models, agents, hair and makeup artists. I saw that everything was going very well and decided to do my own portfolio. When I did the portfolio, I decided to try to get an artist visa and I was able to get it two years ago. Now I am working legally, I have my clients, and everything is going well but NY is a tough city. There are always ups and downs. I have one more year and we will see after that.

    Asli: When I look at your industry from the outside, men have all the good positions. Do think that women in this industry are behind men or are they equal?

    Sinem: Openly, I cannot say that they are equal. There are a lot of successful women photographers but when I look at the top 10, 70 or 80% are male. As someone who wants to be in the men’s fashion photography business, I’m pushing my luck because the business is already male dominated. There are a lot of gay photographers in this business. As a woman photographer, I am trying to survive. Being a woman, I believe gives me an advantage. The feedback that I am getting from my models and agents is that there is a difference as to how a gay male photographer sees a male model and a woman photographer sees a male model. I believe this minor difference makes my work unique.

    Asli: And this gives you an advantage.

    Sinem: Yes, yes, yes.

    Asli: Generally, when I look at the world and we talk about women’s rights, human rights and women doing two jobs at the same time – on one side they have a family, and at the same time try to have a career – do you think there is anything that has to change or do you believe that this idea gives women a chance at a higher position at work? Do you have any advice that you would give women?

    Sinem: Clearly, until this time, I was able to accomplish this as a CEO, but I believe I got tired. That was the reason I stopped my career. When I look at successful women’s lives as a CEO or Executive level, they have a great family life. This shows how strong we are already. You are a mom at home but you are a CEO or boss at work. When I search their personality, the successful ones always listen to their brain, not their heart. We, as women are very emotional and when we leave the emotions on the side we become equal with men. Men do not work with their emotions. I experienced this 15 years and the last six or seven years, I experienced it a different way. I believe that if women leave their emotion on the side there is nothing that can stop them. They can do anything. That is the only advice I can give. Other than that, we are already strong and powerful.

    Asli: I know that two years will go by quickly, but I hope that you stay here longer and continue your career here. What is your goal now in your career?

    Sinem: Hmm, I want to be in the top ten. You know, there is the top ten in the world. There is already a Turkish photographer in this top ten, Mert. I am very proud of him, he is my idol. I hope to reach his level.  This is a big dream for me. If I do reach his level, I will be the happiest person in the world. Even if I cannot, I would be very proud if people are discussing the work of a woman Turkish photographer. I don’t want this just for myself, I want to represent my country. We have a lot of problems in Turkey right now and when people hear this type of story they get happy. This would be my other goal if I cannot be very famous. This is my plan for the next couple of years. I don’t know what I am going to do after that, we will see.

    Asli: We will see, thank you very much.

    Sinem: I appreciate it

    Asli: I wish you success.

    Sinem: Thank you very much.

  • NYFA Los Angeles Holds Social Media Networking Night

    _DSC7452Chair of Industry Outreach and Professional Development Barbara Weintraub held a Social Media Networking Night at NYFA Los Angeles in late July. Over 220 students from the New York Film Academy’s Los Angeles campus attended the event held in the Riverside Building.

    The lobby was filled with film companies like Film Independent and New Filmmakers LA. They were there to share opportunities for students, membership experiences, and career paths.

    A color-coded system helped students get in touch with other students. Small dots on name tags indicated whether the attending was an actor, filmmaker, photographer, or game designer.  

    “There are so many students that I hadn’t met,” said acting student An Phan. “I’m at the Barham building most of the time while the photography and filmmaking students are at Riverside. I never get to interact with them. I saw a lot of portfolios and I was blown away by how talented everyone was. It was great interaction. I had a lot of fun.”

    The New York Film Academy would like to wish all the students applying for professional memberships and those students teaming up to work on a project success on their next venture.