New York Film Academy ACTING & FILM SCHOOL The Most Hands-on Intensive Programs In The World

BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (BFA) IN PHOTOGRAPHY

Tuition:
$13,000 per semester*
Photo By NYFA Photography Chair Brian Dilg Photo By NYFA Photography Grad Scott Brownlee Photo By NYFA Photography Grad Kohichi Ogasahara Photo By NYFA Grad Alexandra Wolf
BFA photography program includes an HDSLR camera and one-week trip

Our three-year Bachelor's is for highly motivated students who would like to enter an intensive hands-on professional course of study. By completing the Bachelor's degree in three-years students:
  • Save one year of expenses
  • Enter the field of their choice a year early
The Academy makes this accelerated schedule possible by creating an extended academic year allowing students to complete three full-length semesters in each calendar year. Students may also choose to complete the program in a traditional four-year time frame.

New York Film Academy BFA degree programs are offered only at our Los Angeles Campus.

OVERVIEW

The New York Film Academy Bachelor of Fine Arts Photography provides candidates with a thorough grounding in the fields of Commercial, Fine Art and Documentary Photography.

Undergraduates are immersed in all aspects of Photography study, representing a progression of knowledge that provides them with academically rigorous and creatively challenging courses. It is an intensive eight-semester program which is scheduled so that motivated students can complete it in three years.

Students' creativity is carefully and constantly nurtured as they are encouraged to find and develop their own unique visual language and vocabulary through a process of investigation, critiquing, creative conceptualizing, self-reflection and practice.

By the end of this course, students will be thoroughly equipped with the creative business skills necessary to succeed in the highly competitive marketplaces of Commercial, Fine Art and Documentary Photography. However, the course also has a broader, cross-disciplinary structure which will empower students with the knowledge to apply their core skills to a range of complementary fields, giving them a wider choice of professional paths to pursue.

The BFA in Photography program integrates Photography, General Education and Art & Design History curricula to offer a well-rounded and well-integrated education. NYFA's instruction in Photography represents a two-pronged system of teaching both creative photography and business of professional photography. As with our MFA and one-year Photography programs, we blend a curriculum designed for the student seeking to explore both sides of the Photography discipline. Through a variety of courses, each designed to focus on one of the many specialized areas within the discipline, students will be introduced to and instructed in the mastery of tools and techniques critical to successful image capture and the business of photography. Our photographers will be prepared to function in the professional workplace, whether in a creative photography environment or in a complementary photography field.

Degree Program Learning Objectives:
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics of available and artificial light and apply this to their images
  • Students will demonstrate mastery of Lightroom as an organizational tool and Photoshop as a non-destructive editing tool
  • Students will demonstrate knowledge of lighting tools and digital and analog camera systems
  • Students will demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of digital output systems
  • Students will demonstrate an applied understanding of the visual language of photography and the ability to incorporate technical, formal and conceptual competencies in their creative work
  • Students will demonstrate working knowledge of industry standard business practices in commercial, fine art and documentary disciplines
  • Students will demonstrate professional skills and practices appropriate to their area of interest
  • Students will demonstrate their knowledge of and relate their work to the technological, artistic, social and cultural currents within the history of photography and contemporary photographic practice
  • Students will identify their area of personal interest and then conceptualize and complete self-directed projects that culminate in a cohesive body of work for printed, online or exhibition presentations
  • Students will demonstrate their ability to produce photographic work that is consistent with high professional standards
  • Students will articulate in verbal and written form the key technical, formal and conceptual issues in their creative work and the work of others

SEMESTER ONE OVERVIEW

In the first semester, students are introduced to core photography skills both in digital capture and lighting. As students learn to shoot and edit, they are exposed to the history and theories of photography. As they begin to analyze and critique images, students develop essential skills to conceptualize, compose and develop their own visual language. Students are encouraged to think beyond convention and apply what they have learned to their creative work.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of available light and make creative use of light modifiers, continuous lighting tools, camera positions, grip equipment and portable electronic flash
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how available light translates to the captured image
  • Demonstrate an applied understanding of the visual language of photography and the ability to incorporate technical, formal and conceptual competencies in their creative work
  • Evaluate the components of exposure by comparing and contrasting aperture ranges, shutter speeds, lenses, lighting tools and filtration options on a wide variety of subjects
  • Demonstrate the ability to pre-visualize an image and realize it through lighting and photographic techniques
  • Investigate the role photographic materials, processes and techniques play in the pursuit of photography as a creative medium
  • Implement knowledge of Lightroom as an organizational tool
  • Apply working knowledge of Lightroom as a file management, workflow processing and resolution tool
  • Thoroughly test the limits of over- and underexposure and RAW processing and their effects on the look of an image
  • Apply working knowledge of Lightroom for basic output to inkjet printers
  • Apply theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images
  • Explore key periods in the history of photography from the nineteenth century to 1960
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to class assignments
  • Demonstrate knowledge of technological, artistic, social and cultural currents from the history of photography perspective from the nineteenth century to 1960
  • Discuss the work of seminal visual artists from the nineteenth century to 1960

SEMESTER TWO OVERVIEW

In the second semester, students will continue to challenge their photographic abilities, both artistically and technically. Students are instructed in the intricacies of available and artificial lighting while expanding their repertoire of techniques as they work with professional strobe lighting and grip hardware. In post-production, they extend their knowledge of basic color and tone corrections to make accurate color prints with modern inkjet printers. Students are introduced to theories of aesthetics, semiotics design and color, which will enhance their visual vocabulary. They explore contemporary movements in photography and visual arts and discuss the work of seminal artists, applying this knowledge to their assignments.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the characteristics of studio lighting (continuous and strobe) and mixed light sources and make creative use of light modifiers, camera positions and grip equipment
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how artificial and mixed lighting translates to the captured image
  • Apply the key skills needed to effectively control and manipulate artificial light and mixed light in a variety of situations
  • Demonstrate their working knowledge of the components of exposure and color temperature
  • Compare and contrast a wide variety of lenses on a range of subjects
  • Demonstrate the ability to pre-visualize an image and realize it through lighting and photographic techniques
  • Demonstrate their working knowledge of global adjustments in Lightroom
  • Apply working knowledge of basic color management to their images and output accurate prints to modern inkjet printers
  • Apply complex theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images
  • Demonstrate their working knowledge of Lightroom as an organizational tool
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches from the history of photography from 1960 to the present and apply these to class assignments
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of technological, artistic, social and cultural currents from the history of photography
  • Examine and discuss the work of seminal visual artists from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
  • Demonstrate knowledge and be able to discuss the effect visual media has had on the way contemporary society reads images
  • Articulate in verbal and written form, the key technical, formal and conceptual issues in their creative work and the work of others

SEMESTER THREE OVERVIEW

In semester three, students will refine their pre-visualization skills with more complex shooting assignments. They delve into applying their knowledge of the characteristics of artificial and mixed lighting, effectively controlling their results. This semester, they are introduced to Photoshop, the predominant digital darkroom tool. Working with color management and adjustment layers, students produce accurate inkjet prints. Students interact with working professionals in a hands-on course, creating valuable networks and seeing first-hand the myriad professional paths jobs available to them on completion of the program.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Apply knowledge of the characteristics of studio lighting (continuous and strobe) and mixed light sources, make creative use of light modifiers, camera positions and grip equipment on location
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how artificial light and mixed light translates to the captured image on location
  • Apply the key skills needed to effectively control and manipulate artificial and mixed light sources in a variety of situations
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of the components of exposure and color temperature
  • Demonstrate the ability to pre-visualize an image and realize it through lighting and photographic techniques
  • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the visual language of photography and the ability to incorporate technical, formal and conceptual competencies in their creative work
  • Demonstrate knowledge of digital backs for medium and large format camera systems
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of Photoshop as a digital darkroom tool
  • Apply knowledge of color management in Photoshop to their images and output accurate prints to inkjet printers
  • Apply advanced theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images
  • Examine and interact with working professionals in the photography industry to create networks and gain information
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to their images
  • Demonstrate knowledge of technological, artistic, social and cultural currents from the history of photography
  • Examine current trends in various facets of the industry as well as photographic printing methods
  • Demonstrate knowledge and be able to analyze the effect visual media has on the way contemporary society reads images
  • Identify key technical, formal and conceptual issues in their creative work and the work of others and articulate these in verbal and written form

SEMESTER FOUR OVERVIEW

In semester four, students will advance their knowledge of camera systems by working almost exclusively with medium and large format photography. They will be introduced to film, working with the Zone System to reinforce their knowledge of exposure and lighting. They will consolidate their proficiency by scanning then processing their images using Photoshop and then output to large format black and white inkjet prints. Students are introduced this semester to the video capabilities of DSLR, where they will become cinematographers, directors, producers and editors on three film projects. They also further their analytical skills during class discussions and research assignments by looking at key histories and theories underpinning the cultural, historical and social contexts in which photographs are produced and distributed.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Apply theories of lighting using medium and large format cameras and film
  • Apply knowledge of the components of exposure to black and white film
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of the Zone System for exposure
  • Demonstrate knowledge of in-camera filtration
  • Examine the limits of over and under exposure using black and white film
  • Demonstrate the ability to pre-visualize an image and realize it through lighting and photographic techniques
  • Demonstrate knowledge of film scanners for medium and large format black and white film and prints
  • Apply advanced knowledge of Photoshop to process images for digital printing
  • Apply knowledge of the Zone System to analyze and evaluate images
  • Produce a portfolio of digital prints using inkjet printers
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of the DSLR for video
  • Produce one mise-en-scene film, one sync sound film and one stop motion/time-lapse film project
  • Apply knowledge of core skills in cinematography, continuous light sources, directing, screenwriting, location sound recording, directing actors to their projects
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of Adobe Premier Pro for non-linear editing
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to their images
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and discuss key histories and theories underpinning the cultural, historical and social contexts in photographs are produced and distributed
  • Examine current trends, key technical, formal and conceptual issues in photography and articulate these in verbal and written form
  • Demonstrate the critical thinking skills necessary to interpret images
  • Students will demonstrate discipline and methodology for submitting quality written material on deadline.

SEMESTER FIVE OVERVIEW

During semester five, students refine the conceptual and practical skills they have developed and embark on a series of self-assigned projects. In digital imaging, they experiment with an array of blending modes and break their images down to components, allowing them even greater creative control. Students fine-tune their printing skills and are given the opportunity to use alternative digital printing processes. This semester introduces electives, enabling students to begin directing their studies in their chosen genre.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Demonstrate the critical thinking skills necessary to interpret images
  • Demonstrate the ability to pre-visualize an image and realize it through lighting and photographic techniques
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of the characteristics of available and artificial light and apply these to their images
  • Conceptualize a series of shooting assignments in the genre of their choice and produce a body of work consistent with high professional standards
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to their images
  • Examine current trends in photography and apply this information to their concepts
  • Demonstrate mastery of Lightroom as an organizational tool and Photoshop as a non-destructive editing tool
  • Apply advanced Photoshop skills in recognizing and breaking down images into their individual elements
  • Examine alternative digital processes for printing
  • Produce a body of digitally printed work
  • Apply complex theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images

SEMESTER SIX OVERVIEW

In this semester, students apply their working knowledge of advanced lighting and digital imaging to their projects. Students are provided with a constructive forum in which they are encouraged to develop their professional objectives by taking stock of their current skill set. Within a mentored environment, students are encouraged to become more independent in their work methods. Students must complete two out of seven electives, which complement their core courses, broadening their perspectives.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Apply working knowledge of advanced lighting and digital imaging to their projects
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to their images
  • Demonstrate the critical thinking skills necessary to interpret images
  • Demonstrate advanced knowledge of Photoshop as a non-destructive editing tool
  • Apply advanced Photoshop and Lightroom skills to their images
  • Apply advanced theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images
  • Demonstrate and advanced understanding of the visual language of photography and the ability to incorporate technical, formal and conceptual competencies in their creative work

SEMESTER SEVEN OVERVIEW

In this semester, students begin to synthesize their coursework to date and begin to position their thesis efforts for the final two semesters of the BFA program. They investigate the business of Professional Photography and examine self-promotion strategies and essential business practices. Students work on branding their business identity and constructing a business plan. They are guided through the initial portfolio development process, and examine current trends in portfolio presentations in all areas of the industry. Students will sharpen their critical thinking abilities as they explore the way images are read, both figuratively and literally. Electives this semester further consolidate students' direction.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Demonstrate knowledge of current business practices in the professional photography industry
  • Apply knowledge of photography business practices to their assignments
  • Construct a working business plan
  • Develop a marketing strategy for self-promotion
  • Identify and apply best business practices for their chosen genre
  • Conceptualize and implement portfolio objectives for a body of work
  • Examine current trends in photo bookmaking, online portfolio presentation and traditional/fine art portfolio presentations and apply these to final output
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the professional photography industry to promote themselves within it
  • Demonstrate advanced critical thinking skills necessary to interpret images
  • Examine master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches and apply these to their images
  • Examine and discuss current trends in photography
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in evaluating a diverse range of historical and contemporary artworks
  • Demonstrate the ability to produce photographic work consistent with high professional standards
  • Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge of technological, artistic, social and cultural currents from the history of photography and contemporary photographic practice and be able to relate their work to this history and practice
  • Identify an area of personal interest and pursue self directed projects that culminate in a cohesive body of work

SEMESTER EIGHT OVERVIEW

During the final semester, students focus primarily on their thesis projects in the genre of their choice, beginning with a clearly stated objective. Consolidating their work from previous semesters, students will demonstrate advanced technical skills, creative vision and personal aesthetic in the production of their final portfolio and body of work for the thesis exhibition. Peer and instructor critiques help guide them through these steps. Final electives this semester enable comprehensive and solid culmination of each students' chosen field.

The BFA program culminates in a final portfolio presentation and group exhibition in which invited peers and industry professionals attend. This event is an opportunity for students to exhibit their best work and to develop their professional network.

Learning Goals:
Students will:
  • Apply advanced conceptual skills to produce a professionally executed body of work
  • Examine current trends in photo bookmaking, online portfolio presentation and traditional/fine art portfolio presentations and apply these to final output
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the professional photography industry to market themselves within it
  • Demonstrate advanced critical thinking skills necessary to interpret images
  • Demonstrate advanced technical skills, creative vision and personal aesthetic in their final portfolio
  • Demonstrate advanced technical controls in digital output
  • Apply advanced knowledge of Photoshop and Lightroom for image processing, file organization and digital output
  • Apply complex theories of aesthetics, semiotics, design, composition and color to their images
  • Analyze and discuss the ideology behind their work
  • Conceptualize and produce a bodies of work of high professional standard for printed, online or exhibition presentations
  • Write a clearly stated thesis objective
  • Demonstrate their knowledge of contemporary exhibition protocols via planning and designing their final thesis exhibition, sequencing images and mounting / framing / hanging techniques



Course Description (*Electives)

Introduction to Lighting

During this course, students will develop and apply the key skills needed to effectively control and manipulate available light in a variety of situations.

Consolidating these skills further, students have the opportunity to demonstrate how their understanding of available light translates to the captured image. This course also includes a hands-on component introducing students to the basics of continuous lighting, grip equipment and portable electronic flash.

Photo Foundations I

From the tools, techniques and aesthetics of digital photography to using Lightroom as an organizational tool, this course lays the critical thinking skills and practical foundations which enable students to explore photography as a visual language.

Across a series of lectures, workshops and assignments, students will investigate the role photographic materials, processes and techniques all play in the pursuit of photography as a creative medium. This course includes an introduction to the basics of digital capture and digital imaging exposure, along with the core principles, language and tools of electronic media. Lightroom essentials include file management, workflow processing and resolution.

History & Aesthetics of Photography I

Students study, analyze and critique the work of master photographers from the birth of photography in the 19th century right up until 1960.

In class, students will investigate the ways in which seminal photographers of this era held a mirror up to society, allowing us to see the technological, artistic, social and cultural currents of life through the lens. Examining master photographers' techniques, aesthetics and approaches segues into students' individual shooting and research projects.

Intermediate Lighting

A hands-on course which aims to extend the core skills students have developed during ‘Introduction to Lighting' in Semester I.

Focusing on studio lighting, this course allows students plenty of hands-on class time to master the basics of the medium. To consolidate their knowledge, students will be encouraged to further explore and experiment with increasingly more sophisticated lighting techniques including mixing light sources to achieve different moods and effects.

Photo Foundations II

During this course students have the opportunity to extend their skills in Lightroom, including making global adjustments to their images whilst experimenting with digital printing techniques.

Students will explore the breadth of digital color concepts technologies and methodologies including: color perception, color models, color gamut, digital color correction and color management as well as gain a working knowledge of digital printing techniques.

History & Aesthetics of Photography II

This course resumes the history of photography from 1960 onwards, investigating cultural, historical and ideological aspects of this era's most enduring and penetrating images.

During class, students will trace the development of analog and digital photography throughout the rise and dominance of the electronic media. Discussions will focus on how these media permeate every aspect of mainstream consciousness and in turn, influence the way contemporary society reads images.

Advanced Lighting

Having mastered the basics of digital capture and mixed source lighting in Semesters 1 and 2, students will experiment with location lighting and practice trouble-shooting strategies to solve a range of specific lighting challenges.

This course is designed to develop an understanding of and ability to control various qualities of light in any environment. Students study a range of location-lighting situations to understand limitations, advantages and disadvantages of different lighting environments and methods.

Capture to Print I

Investigating the current practices and concepts from camera to print is an essential component of this course.

Using Photoshop as their predominant digital darkroom tool, students will begin to experiment with non-destructive image processing as well as workflow platforms, applications, hardware and general practices employed to control and manage digital image files. Class will provide many opportunities to practice working with adjustment layers, manipulating the basic density, contrast and color of a digital image as well as learn the basics of digital printing using Photoshop.

Concepts in Photography

A practical course which exposes students to all the permutations of professional photography.

During this course, students will interact with working professional photographers, art directors and photo editors from a diverse range of industries and backgrounds. Through this exposure, students are better informed about the options open to them at graduation. Modules include online multimedia, books / self-publishing, magazines, periodicals, science-based photography, advertising and art venues. Course includes guest lecturers and field trips.

Applied Photography Practices I

An immersive introduction to medium and large format black and white film techniques allowing students to apply acquired theories of light in a controlled studio environment.

During a series of in-class sessions, students will begin experimenting with medium and large format camera techniques, using black and white film. This will provide many opportunities for students to practice and perfect the lighting skills they have learnt in the first three semesters.

Capture to print II

In this course, students further develop their digital imaging skills. However, this semester, there is a stronger focus on scanning film and using Photoshop to process the images.

In conjunction with Applied Photography Practices I, students will fine-tune their printing abilities as they go about scanning the film they shoot and explore their output options.

The Moving Image I

A practical course introducing students to the craft of the moving image.

Today's photographers are expected to be equally as skilled at using video as they are the moving image. This course offers students a solid introduction to time-based media, allowing them to practice core skills in cinematography, using continuous light sources, directing, screenwriting, location sound recording, directing actors, producing, and non-linear editing. Working with the extensive video capabilities of their cameras: the Canon 5D Mark III and Nikon D800E, students will be invited to create two film projects each encompassing all aspects of the production process.

Processes & Cultures of Photography

When students think analytically about the images they make, they add depth and context to their work.

This semester, students will be introduced to the key histories and theories underpinning the cultural, historical and social contexts in which photographs are produced and distributed. Using these theories as a starting point, students will have the opportunity to develop and sharpen their analytical thinking abilities during a series of in-depth class discussions and research assignments.

Applied Photography Practices II

Refining the conceptual and practical skills they have acquired throughout the past four semesters, students will embark on a series of shooting assignments in studio and/or on location.

An integral part of this class is the conceptualizing process where students receive valuable direction and feedback via a series of in-class critiquing sessions. This is followed by guided shooting sessions, where students have the opportunity to shoot in the style and genre that interests them most.

Capture to Print III

In this digital output course, students extend their existing Photoshop skills and begin to recognize the individual elements that comprise an image. Breaking the image down into its component parts and experimenting with an array of blending modes, allows students greater creative control over their work. Using the concept-driven projects they are working on in Applied Photography Practices II, this class provides students with the opportunity to experiment with alternative digital processes and fine-tune their printing skills along the way.

Intermediate Imaging I

In this digital output course, students extend their existing Photoshop skills and begin to recognize the individual elements that comprise an image.

Breaking the image down into its component parts and experimenting with an array of blending modes, allows students greater creative control over their work. Using the concept-driven projects they are working on in Applied Photography Practices II, this class provides students with the opportunity to experiment with alternative digital processes and fine-tune their printing skills along the way.

Applied Photography Practices III

A core class for Semester 6, Applied Photography Practices III provides students with a constructive forum in which they are encouraged to take stock of their current skill set and further develop their professional objectives. These objectives can be met in a number of ways.

This class will involve deep self-reflection, consultation and feedback with lecturers, peer feedback and the opportunity to shoot individual projects and fine-tune technical skills where necessary. The goal of this class is for students to become more independent in their learning within a mentored, supportive environment, giving them greater ownership over their own projects and future careers.

Intermediate Imaging II

Students refine their Photoshop and Lightroom skills further through mentored instruction. As they gain proficiency in digital inkjet printing, they have the opportunity to complete printed work for other classes this semester.

Business Practices for Photographers

This course prepares students for entering the business of Professional Photography.

Portfolio development, self-promotion strategies and essential business practices are emphasized in students' fields of interest. Students will work on branding their own business identity and constructing a business plan.

Portfolio Development

This course guides students through the initial portfolio development process, outlining principles for targeting a market-ready portfolio to their chosen area of the photographic industry.

Using the appropriate terminology, students will clearly state their portfolio objectives. The course also covers current trends in photo bookmaking, online folio presentation, traditional / fine art portfolio presentation and contemporary printing practices.

Theory & Criticism: Contemporary Photography

Evaluating a diverse range of historical and contemporary artworks and their accompanying critiques, students will begin to examine the ways in which we read images, both literally and figuratively.

During in-depth class discussions, students will sharpen their critical thinking abilities as the class explores how and why certain images are capable of eliciting strong reactions or even altering viewer perceptions. The analysis extends to the study of photography as a whole.

Portfolio Development II

A student's portfolio consolidates the use of the photographic image as a means of expression and communication, demonstrating technical ability, creative vision and personal aesthetic brought together in a cohesive body of work.

Through a process of self-reflection, peer review and lecturer feedback, students will fine-tune their portfolios to the point where they are ready for presentation to the professional sector in their chosen area of the industry.

Final Project

In conjunction with Senior Thesis, students will produce a body of creative work for their graduate group exhibition.

Students prepare their work for exhibition in the genre of their choice. Work is reviewed via critical analysis, peer feedback and lecturer/student consultation.

Senior Thesis

Assisted by weekly writing workshops and critique sessions, students will develop, execute and complete their own thesis projects, culminating in a graduate group exhibition.

Students begin with a clearly-stated thesis objective. Through peer and instructor feedback, weekly critiques, an artist's statement, editing sessions, planning and designing their exhibition, sequencing images, mounting / framing / hanging techniques and the installation itself, they will refine their body of creative work until it matches their objective.

Imaging Outputs

Students explore the advanced technical controls of printing workflows for digital imaging with a view to outputting images for their final body of creative work.

View Camera*

A hands-on introduction to traditional 4 x 5 view camera technology and aesthetics which also covers a number of image-making techniques, studio applications and printing.

During this elective, students gain the necessary experience to employ and control the unique drawing capabilities provided by the view camera. Class time allows for practice using the view camera tilt, swing, shift, rise and fall movements to control focus, perspective and image shape. Students will also learn advanced exposure and traditional black and white printing techniques.

Photography as Fine Art I*

An introduction to Photography as Fine Art. This course allows students a more in-depth exploration of the contemporary visual artists who influence them most and asks them to question how and why this work is influencing their burgeoning style.

Through the modernist and post modernist lens, students explore photography as a conceptual, social and aesthetic tool. In doing so, students will expand their own awareness of contemporary art and apply this knowledge to their own work.

Advertising Photography*

The focus of this course is photographic illustration for advertising. Students are invited to analyze, then through their own work, apply professional advertising studio practices.

In response to a client ‘brief', students will create their own projects in an advertising studio context using advanced applications of medium and large format cameras, digital capture and analog film. The expectation is that students will meet (and exceed) their client's expectations. Typography and graphic design are also covered in this course.

Photojournalism/Documentary I*

An introduction to the history, theory, political influences and trends of past and contemporary artists working in the Documentary Photography field. Students use their theoretical study as a basis and preparation for their own project.

This elective includes weekly critiques of peer student documentary work including journals of self-reflection and process-analysis. The aim is to identify and more importantly, critique any ideological issues which arise so the next generation of Documentary Photographers and Photojournalists is armed with the skills to challenge and develop this unique narrative even further.

Alternative Process*

In this course, students will explore alternative silver processes including lith printing, chromoskedasic and liquid light.

Students are encouraged to explore the myriad creative uses of a variety of processing and printing techniques as a way to expand their photographic vocabulary and personal work.

The Moving Image II*

This course gives students the opportunity to consolidate and master their filmmaking skills via two more complex multimedia projects.

Moving beyond multimedia and montage, students will be required to conceptualize, write, direct, shoot and edit two major sync sound narrative or documentary projects.

Portraiture*

Photographing people is as challenging as it is rewarding. During this course, students practice a range of portraiture techniques – from shooting the subject though to retouching and printing.

Students will experiment with ways of posing, styling and using props in order to control and execute their desired effect. As projects increase in complexity, artistic and technical principles will be applied to a wider variety of subjects and situations. Class assignments may include classic, contemporary and pictorial styles for both studio and environmental portraiture.

Editorial*

Across a series of realistic and challenging assignments, students become immersed in the world of editorial photography to gain experience of working for modern-day publications.

Through the execution of simple portraits (in studio and on location) to elaborate conceptual stories, students will explore a wide range of historical and contemporary editorial work. Class discussions will focus on the key practical skills involved in making the images studied as well as how this work inspires students' own future projects. As they plan their own projects, students will consider their own artistic vision and style whilst being expected to approach their editorial assignment professionally. This involves: ensuring they have a clear brief from their client, establishing good relationships with photo editors, art directors and writers, developing concepts and devising a workable production schedule.

Advanced Imaging*

A student-motivated class which supports the core learning for this semester. Students will use this class time to consolidate and where necessary, fine-tune their knowledge and skill sets via the creative work they are doing in their chosen electives this semester.

Advanced View Camera*

This course is an expansion of View Camera I and gives students the opportunity to produce a cohesive body of work either in studio or on location.

Students will look at current and past trends in large format photography and will solidify their knowledge of view camera techniques by working on a body of work in a chosen genre.

Multimedia Photo Essay*

A project-based class which introduces students to the core techniques necessary for producing narrative picture stories for multimedia online presentations.

After analyzing a range of standout photo essays and examining the techniques used to create them, students will research, plan, photograph and edit their own stories. In addition to incorporating audio, video and still images into their projects, they will be expected to incorporate a variety of classic photo essay elements including: opening pictures, transitions, point pictures, closers, expressive camera angles and lighting demonstrating their relevance in a modern multi-media project.

Web Imaging & Design*

In this course, students look at how the Internet provides contemporary artists, designers and photographers with a flexible and globally accessible environment in which to present their work. Students will then start using the web in a similar way to promote and contextualize their own work.

Students will design and build web-based projects, including experimental or conceptual works as well as online portfolios for self-promotion. Intensive instruction in HTML, Flash and other support programs form a major component of this course.

Commercial Photography*

Students analyze and practice a variety of image-driven assignments with the objective of developing a strong body of commercial work suitable for the current marketplace.

Practicing the technical skills they have gained in previous semesters, students will begin to apply this knowledge to the more specialized field of Commercial Photography. Class time is also devoted to current business practices in this field.

Photography as Fine Art II*

Students conceptualize and make images with a strong social and aesthetic focus. The overall goal is to develop a cohesive Fine Art folio.

This course makes use of students' practical and analytical skills, whilst honing their aesthetic sensibilities, as they develop their body of Fine Art images through a process of weekly critique sessions, mentoring, peer feedback, self reflection and editing.

Photojournalism/Documentary II*

Students conceptualize and execute their own documentary-style photographic essay and in doing so, create their own political or social narrative. The objective is to produce a cohesive Photojournalistic piece.

Students will be expected to practice and challenge their technical skills as well as analyze and discuss the ideology behind their body of work. Weekly critiques and self-reflection are an integral part of the development process.

Dates & Tuition

Fees Per Semester

Tuition: $13,000 (USD) +
Equipment + Lab Fee: $500(USD)



Location & Available Dates

For Los Angeles:
September 2014 - May 2017
January 2015 - September 2017
May 2015 - January 2018
September 2015 - May 2018


Faculty

New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Bobbi Fabian

Bobbi Fabian

Senior Thesis

MA and BA in Photography, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. College level teacher for over 10 years. Commercial photographer in Australia, Asia, and the US for over 15 years. Clients include Timex, United Airlines, Motor Trend Classic, Elle Magazine, Australian Gourmet Traveler, Penguin Books, Audi, Lexus and Westfield. Currently working on several ongoing personal projects.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Paul Bennett

Paul Bennett

Intermediate Lighting

Commercial photographer specializing in product and still life. Clients include: Merrill Lynch, Kenji Studios, B&W Magazine
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Will Hare

Will Hare

Introduction to Lighting

BA in Photography, Art Center College of Design. Clients include Apple, American Institute of Architects, Southern California Gas Co., Discovery Science Center, WAT&G Architects, and Fairfield Timeshares. His work has been published in Sunset Magazine, Orange Coast Magazine, and Builder and Developer Magazine. He is a much sought-after architectural, landscape, and editorial photographer.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Mel Johnson

Mel Johnson

Concepts in Photography

MFA Creative Photography, CSUF; BA Painting/Printmaking/Photography, SDSU, CA. Mel is experienced with analog and digital photography as well as photo theory.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Scott Klinger

Scott Klinger

The Moving Image

MFA, UC, Irvine; BA UCLA. Scott’s photographs and films have been exhibited throughout the world. Recent screenings include 66th Festival de Cannes and the Hollywood Reel Independent Film Festival. Recent exhibitions include LAXART in Los Angeles, Anfiteatro Arte in Milan, and La Generale en Manufacture in Paris. His work is held in the permanent collection of the Kiyosato Museum of Photographic Art.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Kathleen Mclaughlin

Kathleen Mclaughlin

History & Aesthetics of Photography I & II

MFA, Virginia Commonwealth University. Recipient of the Fulbright Senior Scholarship, IREX IARO Grant (NEH), and a Houston Center for Photography Fellowship. Her images have appeared in PDN, LensWork, Rangefinder, B&W Magazine, and The Times Saturday Magazine (UK) and permanent collections at MOPA San Diego, Western Virginia Museum of Art, and the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty John Thawley

John Thawley

Photo Foundations I and II

BA Photography, Art Center College of Design; BA Speech Communications, California Polytechnic State University. Commercial photographer for 21 years and instructor for 11 years at Santa Monica College.
New York Film Academy Photography School Faculty Ming Tshing

Ming Tshing

Capture to Print I

Instructor, Art Center College of Design, Santa Monica College; Digital Imaging at Nash Editions and Espon/Cypress College
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*To be eligible for this offer you must complete full enrollment of either an MFA, BFA, One-Year or Two-Year Photography program at a New York Film Academy location offering the program.

The photography exploration destinations will likely be to Paris, France; Rio De Janeiro, Brazil; or Beijing, China; however from time to time, depending on seasons, another exciting locale may be offered. The one-week photography exploration will occur during the final semester of your first year of study in the associated photography program. This one-week expedition's transportation and accommodation expenses are included in the course tuition (meals are not included).
* All MFA, BFA, BA, MA, and AFA degree programs are offered only at the New York Film Academy Los Angeles campus.
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