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  • NYFA Photography Alumna Sinem Yazici Continues Her Meteoric Rise

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    NYFA photography alumna Sinem Yazici is no stranger to success. As her interview with Asli Pelit illustrates, Sinem was a successful ad agency director before the age of 30 in her homeland of Turkey. This alone is an impressive feat, not least of all because she’s a woman, but more impressive still is her decision to leave her profession and start from scratch as an aspiring photographer.

    As a NYFA photography student in New York she was able to pursue her dream of becoming a fashion photographer, proving that it’s truly never too late to pursue your dreams. Her dedication to the craft has quickly made her one of the rising stars in men’s fashion photography and while she has changed careers, her determination and success remains unmuted.

    She recently sat down with us to discuss her experience at NYFA, her passion for New York City and men’s fashion photography.

    New York Film Academy would like to congratulate Sinem and wish her continued success in her endeavors.

    Below you can find her full interview with Asli. Note: the views and opinions expressed in this interview do not necessarily reflect those of the New York Film Academy.

    New York – Studio Washington

    Interviewer: Asli Pelit    Guest: Sinem Yazici

    Asli: New York is a difficult city to be successful or to live in. To be successful is even more difficult. To leave your life behind you and start over again and even start a totally new career, which is photography that you have never done before also as a woman, how did you decide to come to New York?

    Sinem: Of course! I should tell you a little bit about my life before I answer this question. I was in the advertising business. For about 15 years I worked for a big international agency and two of the biggest companies in Turkey. When I became a director at my company I was 29. My goal had been to become a director before I turned 30 years old. After I reached my goal, I started asking myself, “Ok what is going to happen now? What is my next goal or target?” because I always set goals and targets for myself in life. When I started asking myself these questions I realized that I did not want to work in advertising anymore. I was so tired, and felt like I had been working for 30 years: never ending meetings, writing back and forth, working on the weekends. I remember that some days I was working 20 hours a day. At the time that I asked myself these questions, I already had an interest in art and photography. While I had never been the type of person to walk around with a camera everywhere I had been in the photo studio a lot and had worked with photographers because of my job in advertising. So I said to myself, “Why don’t I do this job? I would love to do this! What can I do about it?” One of my clients was a photographer. I called him my brother, Kerim Sandiman. I went to him and said “Kerim can you take me as an assistant to work for you? I don’t want money. I just want to learn what you are doing.” He said, “My dear Sinem, you have to take a class first.” So I said “ok,” and I started going to a class instructed by Muhammer Yatmaz, who is a photography teacher. I loved his classes and I had a great time. I completed two levels. I started taking pictures of my friends and family and I was enjoying it. I told myself I had to educate myself more about photography. I decided to go to NY because Advertising business was almost done for me. When I started doing this, I was up and down and I couldn’t decide what to do but I didn’t stay home and do nothing, I kept learning about photography.  I came to NY and took a program at the New York Film Academy. The program was extremely fun and for years I had been dying to live in New York City. This period in my life was fun and I made a lot of good friends.  I was stopping people in the street and telling them “ I am sorry, are you a model? Can I take your photograph?”

    Asli: Yes, it is a classic NY story.

    Sinem: I took a lot of pictures in NYC and then I went back to Turkey. I started working this time with Tamer Yilmaz, who is a professional photographer and my client. I started working as his assistant and editor. I got a chance to see the real fashion world when I worked with him. When I started taking pictures, I knew I wanted to be a fashion photographer, and mostly I wanted to photograph men’s fashion. My advertising background taught me to focus on one thing and do your best. I told myself that this was my goal, and I wanted to focus solely on being a photographer. I am really enjoying what I do. I worked one year with Tamer and slowly, slowly started missing NY and started wondering if I should go back. I decided to go back. It was a really tough decision but I told myself this, “If I do something really good in one year, I will give myself one more year, but if I cannot do anything, at the end of the year I will go back and continue my photography career in Turkey”. I came to NY on a tourist visa and I had to leave the country every six months. After the first six months, everything went very well. I realized that I had not done a portfolio because I was taking pictures of my friends and family. I started working with professional models, and while I was doing this I submitted everything that I had done and sent my photography everywhere. All of a sudden I started seeing my photos all around and set-up two or three photo shoots a week. That was unbelievable and I started to have a good network of models, agents, hair and makeup artists. I saw that everything was going very well and decided to do my own portfolio. When I did the portfolio, I decided to try to get an artist visa and I was able to get it two years ago. Now I am working legally, I have my clients, and everything is going well but NY is a tough city. There are always ups and downs. I have one more year and we will see after that.

    Asli: When I look at your industry from the outside, men have all the good positions. Do think that women in this industry are behind men or are they equal?

    Sinem: Openly, I cannot say that they are equal. There are a lot of successful women photographers but when I look at the top 10, 70 or 80% are male. As someone who wants to be in the men’s fashion photography business, I’m pushing my luck because the business is already male dominated. There are a lot of gay photographers in this business. As a woman photographer, I am trying to survive. Being a woman, I believe gives me an advantage. The feedback that I am getting from my models and agents is that there is a difference as to how a gay male photographer sees a male model and a woman photographer sees a male model. I believe this minor difference makes my work unique.

    Asli: And this gives you an advantage.

    Sinem: Yes, yes, yes.

    Asli: Generally, when I look at the world and we talk about women’s rights, human rights and women doing two jobs at the same time – on one side they have a family, and at the same time try to have a career – do you think there is anything that has to change or do you believe that this idea gives women a chance at a higher position at work? Do you have any advice that you would give women?

    Sinem: Clearly, until this time, I was able to accomplish this as a CEO, but I believe I got tired. That was the reason I stopped my career. When I look at successful women’s lives as a CEO or Executive level, they have a great family life. This shows how strong we are already. You are a mom at home but you are a CEO or boss at work. When I search their personality, the successful ones always listen to their brain, not their heart. We, as women are very emotional and when we leave the emotions on the side we become equal with men. Men do not work with their emotions. I experienced this 15 years and the last six or seven years, I experienced it a different way. I believe that if women leave their emotion on the side there is nothing that can stop them. They can do anything. That is the only advice I can give. Other than that, we are already strong and powerful.

    Asli: I know that two years will go by quickly, but I hope that you stay here longer and continue your career here. What is your goal now in your career?

    Sinem: Hmm, I want to be in the top ten. You know, there is the top ten in the world. There is already a Turkish photographer in this top ten, Mert. I am very proud of him, he is my idol. I hope to reach his level.  This is a big dream for me. If I do reach his level, I will be the happiest person in the world. Even if I cannot, I would be very proud if people are discussing the work of a woman Turkish photographer. I don’t want this just for myself, I want to represent my country. We have a lot of problems in Turkey right now and when people hear this type of story they get happy. This would be my other goal if I cannot be very famous. This is my plan for the next couple of years. I don’t know what I am going to do after that, we will see.

    Asli: We will see, thank you very much.

    Sinem: I appreciate it

    Asli: I wish you success.

    Sinem: Thank you very much.

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  • NYFA Alumni and Faculty Crew “Dead House” for LionsGate and Laugh Out Loud

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    The New York Film Academy community played an integral part in the making of “Dead House” (King Bach, Emmanuel Hudson, D.C Young Fly), a new scripted sitcom from one of the world’s top digital comedians, Vine star Andrew Bachelor — also known as “King Bach.”

    A LionsGate production, “Dead House” is executive produced by Kevin Hart and, as seen in the Hollywood Reporter, launched on the star’s online comedy network Laugh Out Loud, or LOL.

    “Dead House” portrays the complicated living arrangements when a human joins the cast of a reality show where four zombies must live and work together in one house.

    “We had almost a full NYFA crew w Alumni and staff,” NYFA Faculty Member and Director of Photography Travis Hoffman. This included NYFA Alumni and Director Andrew Bachelor, and NYFA Faculty Member and Producer Anthony Cook.

    Many more from the NYFA community filled out the crew. See a full list below:

    NYFA Staff and Alumni who worked on shoot:

    Director – Andrew Bachelor (Alumni)

    Director of Photography – Travis Hoffman (Faculty)

    Producer – Anthony Cook (Faculty)

    Casting Director – Alex Perry (Faculty)

    Production Designer – Prarthana Joshi (Faculty)

    Gaffer and 2nd Unit DP – Richard Greenwood (Faculty)

    Best Boy Electric and 2nd unit Gaffer – John Acevedo (Staff)

    Key Grip – George Oliver (Staff)

    Best Boy Grip – Aaron Pong (Staff)

    A Cam Operator – Travis Hoffman (Faculty)

    B Cam Operator – Jeremy Harris (Alumni)

    A Cam 1st AC – Chris Kistan (Alumni)

    B Cam 1st AC – Evan Stulc (Faculty)

    DIT – Maram Jaoser (Alumni)

    Actress – Natalie Whittle (Alumni)

    The New York Film Academy would like to congratulate all our alumni and staff who worked on “Dead House.” The show is released Aug. 3 on Laugh Out Loud.

     

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  • 3 Emmy Nominations for “A Girl in the River,” Edited by NYFA Master Class Lecturer Geof Bartz

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    “A Girl in the River” has been nominated for three Emmy Awards, including Best Documentary and Best Documentary Short. The HBO documentary was edited by New York Film Academy’s own Master Class Lecturer and Curriculum Advisor Geof Bartz.

    Directed by Sharmeen Obaid, executive produced by Sheila Nevins and Tina Brown, and produced by Lisa Heller, the film follows the story of one woman who survived an “honor killing” attack in her native Pakistan.

    Geof Bartz is Supervising Editor of HBO Documentary Films. “A Girl in the River” marks Geof’s 12th Emmy nomination (with five prior wins). The film won the Oscar for Best Documentary Short Subject, which marked Geof’s fifth Oscar, and director Sharmeen Obaid’s second. It’s an incredible awards season journey that, perhaps even more remarkably, has made a real-world impact.

    First they won the Oscar,” observed NYFA New York Chair of Documentary Filmmaking Andrea Swift. “Then they won the DuPont. Now, the Emmy nomination. Yet the most important and satisfying part of all, is that ‘Girl In The River’ actually inspired the Pakistani government to reconsider their laws.”

    The New York Film Academy will hold a master class with Geof Bartz in early August that will include a special screening of “A Girl in the River.” The film will also serve as a jumping-off point for student instruction and exploration.

    “We’re all looking forward to watching the movie with Geof and discussing the intricacies of creating Oscar-worthy docs,” noted Andrea Swift.

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  • NYFA Graphic Design Students Visit Studios of Designers Milton Glaser and Mirko Ilic

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    This month, New York Film Academy graphic design students visited the studios of Milton Glaser and Mirko Ilic. This exciting opportunity was made possible by NYFA faculty Jee-eo​​n Lee, who worked at Glaser’s studio as a young designer.

    The students got a first-hand look at Glaser’s studio and works in progress. They were able to ask questions about the world of design and how Glaser see’s design going forward.

    Glaser is perhaps the most well known graphic designer working today, with an international presence and a reputation as a Renaissance man who has changed the graphic design industry with his uniquely intellectual and creative approach to animation and design. He is the creator of the I (heart) NY logo and was awarded the 2004 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum.

    Students then visited with Mirko Ilic, where they were able to see works in progress and discuss design, activism and protest as seen through the lens of graphic design.

    Ilic’s diverse design career has included holding art director position for Time Magazine International Edition as well as the New York Times Op-Ed pages. He also runs his own firm, Mirk Ilic Corp. His work has been recognized with many awards and in in many collections, including the Smithsonian Museum and MoMA.

    So inspiring to hear such honest insight from both Milton and Mirko,” said NYFA Graphic Design Faculty Member Jee-Eon Lee.

     

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  • Broadcast Journalism Updates for August 2

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    Recently I wrote about how NBC News has developed a daily news program for distribution exclusively via Snapchat Discover. And while I can’t tell you how big an audience the program is attracting, I can tell you that it has generated a lot of positive notice. USA Today, for instance, went so far as to say “we may have seen the future of TV news this week.” That’s a pretty bold statement, even with the qualifier “may.” What’s obvious is that this program is unlike the prime time “NBC Nightly News.” And while I will always be a prime time kind of guy, folks half my age (one-third?) are looking for something very different.

    Inline image 1

    Meanwhile, ABC News — which is located about 16 blocks north of NBC News, here in New York — and the millennial-focused news site ATTN: have entered into a production partnership. ABC has lots of full-motion video content, and ATTN: has a very different distribution platform (and audience) than ABC. The award for the most out-of-touch headline of the week goes to The Street, which headlined their report on the partnership “Disney’s ABC News Using Social Media To Target Millennials.” Isn’t everyone?

    Inline image 1

    There is still plenty of discussion about the BBC’s seemingly skewed salary policies, that result in male presenters getting paid more than their female counterparts. Rachel Burden had an op-ed piece on The Guardian website provocatively titled “I’m paid a lot of money for doing my job – but the BBC must act on gender equity.”

    Inline image 2
    Daniella Gemignani came to NYFA from Sao Paulo to enhance and expand her skill set. Now that she is back home, she is working for Brazilian media giant Globo. Recently she was on-air, conducting an interview with film director Michael Bey about the latest installment of the “Transformers” science-fiction series, which just opened in Brazil. A few months ago she was sitting in class, and now she is on-set with a famous Hollywood director.Inline image 3

    Some of our Summer students were doing a news story on NYC subway track fires last week, so they went to the experts when it comes to firefighting — the FDNY. And not only did they get some great information, but t-shirts as well. All in all, not a bad day! The team is from (left to right) New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and Connecticut.

    Inline image 3
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    August 3, 2017 • Academic Programs, Broadcast Journalism, Community Highlights • Views: 3018

  • NYFA Supports New Film Incentives in Miami-Dade County

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    South Beach’s star is rising. Miami-Dade County’s reputation as an excellent filmmaking location has been cemented once again with a new announcement by the Department of Regulatory and Economic Resources. A new local TV/film and digital entertainment production incentive program will soon boost and support film and entertainment projects and help improve the local economy and industry workforce.

    New York Film Academy in South Beach has followed the intense process and attended numerous meetings — including the first, at the Commission Chamber of Miami-Dade County on April 26, for incentives for the City of Miami Beach. Following were county-wide meetings on June 23, July 13, and July 18, all of which saw NYFA South Beach students and faculty attend to express their support.

    What does this mean for students & future film graduates of Florida?

    Students in South Florida will greatly benefit from the incentives as they reward filmmakers and production companies for hiring students or recent grads. Monetary breaks and rewards will also be available to hand-picked films that keep production local and meet specific criteria. This will help keep production in Miami and give more job opportunities to those who study or have studied film. The aforementioned criteria is included below.

    • At least $1 million must be spent during production in Miami-Dade County on payroll (for Miami-Dade County residents only) and other expenditures.
    • 70% (or more) of the entire production must be produced in Miami-Dade County.
    • Each production project is required to hire a minimum of 50 main cast and crew (employees) that are Miami-Dade County residents and must include at least one student/recent graduate who is enrolled at or recently graduated from a local college or university. Students do not have to be residents to qualify.
    • Salaries for Miami-Dade County residents hired must be a minimum of the current living wage as defined by County law.
    • A minimum of 80% of vendors used on the production project must be Miami-Dade County-based registered businesses.

    NYFA_Film_Incentives_Meeting
    More Job Opportunities for Film Graduates from Miami-Dade

    These factors will help ensure film production, when possible, will remain local, in beautiful Miami. Students and alums of schools such as NYFA will have more opportunities to get hands-on experience as the new law will incentivize filmmakers who hire at least one student or recent graduate.

    New York Film Academy anticipates effects from the announcement tremendously benefiting the South Beach location: “The New York Film Academy South Beach is very happy that the efforts of support of our staff and students for the Miami Dade Film Initiatives have helped in pushing the incentives through to become a reality,” Director & Senior Vice President Elli Ventouras said. “Being the only college in Miami to offer a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in Acting for Film, in addition to our Bachelor of Fine Arts in Filmmaking, we feel that this initiative may help to open the doors for our students in the film industry in Miami Dade.”


    Up to $100,000 per project will be the rebate for qualifying productions. Eligible projects will be decided on an individual basis, and each project and grant agreement will require approval by the Board of County Commissioners.

    Miami has served as the primary location for many notable films, including such classics as “Scarface,” “Caddyshack,” “The Godfather II,” and the Oscar-winning critical and box office smash “Moonlight.” With the recent vote, many more filmmaking luminaries are sure to choose Miami as a production destination.

    Map of Miami-Dade County

    For more information on the TV/film and digital entertainment production incentive program, visit the Office of Film and Entertainment. For more information about New York Film Academy South Beach, visit our website.

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    August 1, 2017 • South Beach • Views: 2224

  • NYFA’s Ragga Thordarson Continues to Garner International Recognition

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    NYFA’s Ragga Thordarson continues to garner international recognition, this time in her native country of Iceland. Interviewed by Morgunblaðið, one Iceland’s leading papers, Ragga spoke of her success in the film and television industry as a producer, director, and consultant.

    The article went on to discuss her role within the New York Film Academy and the importance of the inclusive, diverse environment NYFA fosters.

    You can find the original article here. An English version can be found below.

    “The World of Film is International”

    Ragnhildur Magnúsdóttir Thordarson, or Ragga, as she is called, lives in Los Angeles where she works at the prestigious New York Film Academy. Ragga has produced and participated in a number of creative and film projects both overseas and here at home in Iceland and was among other things, a consultant to the team behind “The Simpsons” on the Simpsons’ Iceland episode.

    Ragga Thordarson | New York Film Academy

    “This started when I graduated with a Master’s degree in Producing For Film and Television  from New York Film Academy in March 2012. I left Iceland in 2010 and graduated two years later,” says Ragga, who has done well in recent years in Los Angeles, California, USA, as a Producer. The projects include short films that have been featured at various film festivals.

    In 2012, Filmbreak named Ragga Best Producer for one such project. Her short sketch video was named Carlos & Brandi 2 and was a follow-up to the first Carlos and Brandi, based on short episodes of the Icelandic-American couple created by Ragga. She also wrote and directed the documentary From Oakland to Iceland. Ragnhildur now works as Director of Admissions at New York Film Academy, Los Angeles, which oversees students’ applications worldwide.

    Consultant for Icelandic Simpsons

    “Before I graduated, I worked as a radio and television host (in Iceland) and as a filmmaker. So I have been producing across platforms for a considerable amount of time,” says Ragga

    “After graduating, I started working as a Producer in LA in various projects. Among other things, I worked for Reebok and was a consultant on “The Simpsons” Iceland episode. I produced and wrote content that was featured on “Funny or Die.” In fact, I was working on various types of projects. Then I started working in events for New York Film Academy. “

    Industry professionals with impressive resumes

    Ragga then began managing Q and A´s and various events at NYFA’s Los Angeles campus. “We had guests coming to Warner Brothers for screenings and Q and A’s. There were people from all different jobs in entertainment and film; screenwriters and actors, for example, such as Linda Woolverton, Josh Brolin and Jonah Hill. Then there were filmmakers, even animation experts and others, some household names and others less known to the public, but industry professionals who have great bodies of work and extensive credits, sometimes behind the scenes. These people come to share their creative and industry experiences with students. This was a great job.” Ragga is raised in the United States, but is Icelandic and has spent considerable time living in Iceland as well. She and her husband have lived in Los Angeles in recent years.

    New York Film Academy is International

    The environment is international

    Ragga managed events at NYFA until she was eight months pregnant with her first child. “I had my daughter Stella three years ago, and was what in Iceland would be considered a ‘last minute mom’” says Ragga, and laughs.

    “After becoming a mom, I went to work on new projects for New York Film Academy and because I knew the school so well, I ended up working in Admissions. My job then evolved into the position I am in now. I love this school, the departments within it work well together, and  more than half of the students are international. This is a very global environment, and it’s great to be surrounded by people who are storytellers from all over the world. You hear Portuguese, Arabic, Chinese and many more languages ​​daily here. It reflects in my opinion the cinema world which is far more international than I think people generally realize. “Hollywood is such a multinational place and New York Film Academy’s student body reflects that. Then filmmakers (including NYFA’s) meet at various film festivals across the world, with their common love of and passion for film. “

     

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    July 31, 2017 • Academic Programs, Faculty Highlights, Film School, Filmmaking • Views: 3764

  • NYFA Veterans Attend Exclusive Screening of “Dunkirk”

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    This month, NYFA Veterans were invited to attend an exclusive pre-release screening of feature film “Dunkirk,” through the Motion Picture and Television Relief Fund’s (MPTF) Veteran Benefits Assistance Program. NYFA Veterans William Grodnick and Luis Camacho attended the special screening of “Dunkirk” in New York City and have shared their experiences with the NYFA Blog. Please note: this blog has been edited for clarity and length.

    Continue Reading

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    July 27, 2017 • Academic Programs, Community Highlights, Film School, Filmmaking, Veterans • Views: 4081

  • 5 Things We Learned From Chris Devane’s Casting Class

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    Outside of the New York Film Academy, Acting Instructor, Chris Devane is a giant in the casting industry. Devane detailed his experience with large casting calls, which can include seeing over 400 people in a single day, to an hour-long casting rehearsal with a single actress. With clients like Wal-Mart and major production studios, Devane knows everything there is to know about the casting process. Most importantly, he has been able to pass that information on to acting students. Here are the top 5 lessons we took from Devane’s Casting Class.

    1. There Are a Lot of Actors Actively Seeking Work

    Devane began the class with a simple question, “How many union actors are working in the United States of America?” After letting students take a guess, Devane revealed the staggering number.

    There are 160,000 actors in the union and untold scores of hopeful eyed youngsters trying to enter the industry every day. Perhaps more troubling is the fact that the average income for those 160,000 union actors is $7,000. This includes big stars like Chris Pine and Zoe Saldana who make millions of dollars per movie.

    Devane brought up these numbers to make a point. Those that want to act had better be prepared to work for free or very little. They will need to love their craft beacuse acting is not always kind to actors.

    “The only person who can help your career is you,” Devane told his students. “Getting success is easy. Keeping it is a challenge.” Many actors come to LA from smaller cities where they have had some success. It means nothing when they get to Hollywood. “There are no failed actors. Just people who quit.”

    Casting Tips | New York Film Academy

    1. You Have to Really, Really Love Acting

    “There’s more competition in acting than any other field in the world,” Devane said. While working for free or very little upfront may be necessary, eventually, payment will be required. “Who’s paying your rent or putting gas in your car if you work for free? This is show business,” Devane warned. Deciding how much one’s work is worth can be challenging.

    This is all part of the gig. Actors typically work twelve to eighteen hour days, six days a week. This is an exhausting and demanding schedule. All the while, actors are being judged. They’re judged for their looks, they are judged for their talent, and they are even judged for their behavior. This scrutiny tends to get the better of most people.

    Self-promotion is of the utmost importance. There are more opportunities to be seen with YouTube and other social media platforms but there’s also a bigger opportunity to fail. A good casting director will not place an actor in a role for which they are not prepared. But the advent of casting based on followers has a lot of young talent scrambling to put out any work they have in hopes of gaining a following.

    Devane suggests putting only polished work out for consumption. Start developing a style and a voice now. Don’t rely on followers. They do not denote talent. Do solid work, help others in developing their work, and promote the finished projects.

    1. Casting Has Nothing to Do with Talent

    When Devane revealed this information there was tangible hitch within the audience. Talent, fairy tales would have you believe, is the most important aspect in getting started in the entertainment industry. How else can someone with little experience get his or her start?

    Devane says the most important thing an actor should be able to do is be themselves on camera. It is the job of a casting agent to find the best person for the role and not the best actor in the world. So, if an actor is relaxed and natural on camera than they can be cast in something.

    Most people who have difficulty getting cast believe it’s something they have done wrong. According to Devane most of these people are missing a personality. Many balked at this statement because it can be rather difficult information to process. Some take it as an insult. But nothing could be further from the truth.

    The first step to fixing a problem is admitting there is a problem. Devane suggests actively listening to get more parts. Listen to the partner in the scene. Don’t just wait for the next line. Also, listen to the casting director. If one is asked to try the line a different way, you should really think about how that note changes the reading. Being able to take direction makes any actor more desirable.

    1. Reputation Travels Faster than any Human

    Reputations cannot be bought or erased. They are earned through the most precious non-renewable source, time. With this in mind, Devane advised students to guard and protect their reputations with everything they have.

    “The person who gets cast is the one who can work with the director.” Being a diva on set or overstepping boundaries will have an actor on the outs faster than they can sign a contract. Once a job is booked, it’s important to know on-set rules so as not to become a liability. “If you hear ‘points’ on set you need to know what that means and act accordingly,” Devane told students.

    Don’t turn down work. “Look, sometimes being picky can be beneficial, but when someone brings you a job turning it down can look ungrateful at best and disrespectful at worst.” When auditioning for a role make sure the shoot days do not conflict with any other projects or personal appointments. If there’s a potential for conflict mention it at the start of the audition.

    Be on time. Every minute of production can cost hundreds or thousands of dollars. Crew call is often much earlier and much later than an actor’s call time. There is zero excuse for holding up a production and everyone will remember who caused that hold up.

    1. There is No Way to Tell Why You Did Not Get Cast

    Devane let students in on a secret that most professional working actors do not know. He told them that not only does talent not matter but there are a million little reasons behind why an individual does get cast. “Get rid of the feeling of I could have done better.”

    Sometimes one individual will pair better with an actor that has already been cast. Other times a director might have a working relationship with an actor. Sometimes a client will change their mind and want a different look than they originally set out to cast. It could be that there was just a better actor in the room that day.

    It is important to remember that, “You’re going to be frustrated throughout your entire career. Be positive and confident in your ability, skills, and knowledge. It’s the only thing to separate you from the 180 other people auditioning for the role.”

    It’s heartbreaking to get rejection after rejection but again, acting is not for the faint of heart. It requires great passion and equally as much patience and keep in mind that somewhere out there is the perfect role.

    Devane left students with this thought, “The harder you work, the more fortune you’ll have.” Do not wait to be chosen. Be your own biggest advocate.

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    July 27, 2017 • Acting • Views: 2474

  • NYFA Documentary Filmmaking Students’ “Where Cultures Collide” to Air on KCETLink

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    “Where Cultures Collide,” a web series produced and directed by NYFA’s MFA Documentary students in Los Angeles, is set to be published by PBS affiliate KCETLink starting August 1, 2017. The five-part series of 5-7 minute segments explores aspects of different cultures that have merged into the mainstream in Southern California and been transformed to a degree. The series spotlights cultural contributions from Latin America, Thailand, Polynesia, Armenia, and Saudi Arabia.

    KCET_Students_H20A0993As part of their Community Film Project class, our MFA Documentary students had a unique opportunity to work with KCETLink in a professional producing relationship. The class, led by instructor Denise Hamilton, met with their “client” KCETLink to determine their interests. After the initial contact, they developed and presented concepts for them in a pitch meeting and were Greenlit to produce stories about unique “cultural clashes”. It was a professional pitch session that they passed with flying colors!

    Students Ashley Harris, GuangLi Zhu, Yuan Li, Zhengyi Zhong, Sultan Aljurays, Camilla Borel-Rinkes, Mira Hamour, Carolina Sosa Andres and Kristen Lydsdottir served as directors, producers and crew members, responsible for the entire process from pre-production to post.

    KCET_Denise_H20A1041

    “It was a very difficult assignment” Denise acknowledges, “because they had to conduct extensive research and produce while simultaneously planning and prepping their thesis films.”

    And, like any Client / Producer relationship, the group received notes for adaptations and changes throughout the process. Ultimately, the students obtained an invaluable lesson about creating work for someone else, and got a kick-start into the professional world of producing for a high-level client. KUDOS!

     

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    July 27, 2017 • Documentary Filmmaking • Views: 2117