bill einreinhofer
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  • Broadcast Journalism Update – November 2020 Edition

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    2020 has been an eventful year, and even though there are less than two months to go, the pace of events shows no sign of slowing down.

    “Election Day” in the United States became “Election Week.” And as I write this, the Election is still being litigated in court. NYFA Broadcast Journalism grads have been reporting this story to audiences across America, and around the world. Catherine Kobayashi is a New York-based reporter for NHK, Japan’s national Public TV network. Previously she was the lead presenter for NHK World, an English-language news service based in Tokyo.

    “Deep in the Heart of Texas” (which is the title of a famous old song… I know a lot about “old songs”), former NYFA student Nicole Cross had a long night that dragged into the early morning (and beyond) as one of the anchors/presenters for Election Night coverage on Spectrum News 1, a 24-hour local news channel available throughout Texas.

    Danish TV producer/reporter Celina Liv Danielsen spent many, many hours in Las Vegas. But not at any of the casinos. Instead, she was at the Clark County Administration Building waiting for the latest vote count.


    Karen Hua
     remembered the first rule of TV reporting… drink water.
    NYFA instructor Evgenia Vlasova has a substantial social media presence. She discovered what it is like for a major network to see your story, and liked it so much they decide they want to do it too… Personally, I think Genia’s version was better!

    Speaking of Genia, she and I co-hosted a two-hour webinar on TV production during the age of COVID. The first hour looked at TV news production, while in the second hour we explored change in the production of talk shows, episodic television, and feature films. The webinar is part of a three-day conference called Astana Media Week, which draws TV producers and executives from throughout Central Asia.

    And, in keeping with NYFA production protocols, we wore our masks.

    Of course, lots of other things happened over the last few months. Broadcast Journalism graduate Federica Polidoro covered the legendary Biennale de Venezia, one of the few international film festivals that actually took place in-person this year.

    In Brazil, NYFA alum Daniella Gemignani celebrated a work anniversary at media giant Globo, in Sao Paulo Brazil.

    Paula Varejao, who works on Globo’s Mais Globosat, continues going to places I can only dream of visiting.

    Broadcast Journalism grad Beatriz Puente is working for Band TV. And while she loves her job as a producer, I think she might love being an on-air reporter even more…

    One of her recent stories was how a well-known dance club in Rio opened and violated every COVID-19 rule you could imagine. This is why Journalism is so important. Frankly, there are times when Journalism is literally a matter of life and death.

    Many time zones away, former NYFA student Abiola Jinadu has established her own production company in Nigeria. The company specializes in a wide range of video programming, the same way we train our students to be multimedia journalists capable of working in many different settings. Congratulations, Abiola!

    Closer to New York City, NYFA grad Kendall Bunch made her way to Marquette, Michigan (one of the smaller TV markets in the United States) to start her career. It is a path many of us have taken. Myself, I spent a couple of years in Madison, Wisconsin…

    Broadcast Journalism alum (and U.S. Navy veteran) Clyde D. Gunter is now a Content Strategist at ESPN Original Content.

    And current Broadcast Journalism student (and part-time Good Morning America studio crew member) Brett Mills shows how to maintain social distancing with a Sony FS5 HD/4K camera.

    Stay tuned for more updates from Broadcast students, alumni, and faculty. For more information about our Broadcast Journalism programs, click here.
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  • NYFA Broadcast Journalism: June Updates

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    This Spring’s graduation was a graduation like no other. Not just here at the New York Film Academy, but across the United States and around the world. COVID-19 pretty much changed everything.

    Cover of the May 2020 issue of ‘The New Yorker’

    As you might expect, our grads — working at local, national and international news organizations — are in the middle of covering what is the story of a lifetime. But one Broadcast Conservatory program grad, award-winning investigative journalist George Colli, has been involved in a singularly unique way.

    NYFA Alum George Colli

    George is developing a new, online news platform, but he put everything on “hold” after he spoke to news sources across his home state of Connecticut about what was then a potentially deadly shortage of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE). Put simply, initially there wasn’t any. George used his reporting skills to not only reveal the depth of this problem, but also find critically needed supplies, then put together an organization to distribute them to the places where they were needed the most. That included literally millions of face masks.

    NYFA alum George Colli (Right) covering shortage of PPE

    While we are proud of all of our grads, there is a special place in our hearts for George Colli. He helped (and continues to help) save countless lives…

    Earlier this year, former NYFA Broadcast Journalism student Sura Ali signed up for one of our short-term Broadcast Journalism workshops. Her “modest” goal was to to do nothing less than change her life. She wanted to reinvent herself. And, based on a recent LinkedIn posting, it looks like Sura found what she was looking for.
    “When I was 28, studying at the New York Film Academy, I was told ‘you are talented, outgoing and lively.’ I did a double take… wait what? They appreciate my voice and activism here? I finally felt at home.”
    Thanks, Sura. We’re glad to know that you found what you were looking for at NYFA.

    As most of you know, I normally spend a lot of time traveling. Over the past three months, beyond weekly trips to the supermarket, I haven’t gone anywhere. But I did have a chance to travel “virtually” to Manila, to participate in an online event tied to World Press Freedom Day. It was great to interact with 125+ journalism students. Thanks to the American Embassy in Manila for the opportunity to participate. (And in the spirit of “Where’s Waldo,” can you find me in the picture below?)

    This week I am “virtually” attending the Cannes International Film Festival, in support of my indie feature film Invisible Love. While I’d love to share it with you’ll have to wait until Spring 2021 for its release. But I can share with you the preview/trailer. A period piece, this China/Vietnam/U.S. co-production takes place during the 1930’s in what was then known as French Indochina. Today, it is Vietnam.

    For the time being, we are only offering our 4-Week Broadcast Journalism workshop onlineYou can find more information here.

    Stay Tuned,
    Bill Einreinhofer
    Chair, NYFA Broadcast Journalism Department
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  • May Broadcast Journalism Department Updates

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    Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, TV news programs around the world have changed the way they operate. Our own NYFA News is no exception. All NYFA classes have moved online. Plus, our student producers/reporters face the challenge of creating a news program while everyone in New York is encouraged to stay at home, and all of us are expected to maintain “social distancing.”
    This makes their accomplishments especially impressive, as they have found innovative ways to produce solid, information-based stories. They are also shooting entirely on-location, transforming NYFA News into a reporter-driven program.
    Watch for yourself how the current NYFA 1-Year Broadcast Journalism Conservatory students have met what could be the challenge of a lifetime.
    The skills NYFA students learn can take them in a number of different directions. For Grace Shao, that includes time spent reporting for China Global Television Network (CGTN). She then joined CNBC, based in their Singapore bureau. She is now a media consultant and creative director for PayPal’s podcast series focusing on business innovation in the Asia Pacific region. She is also the Hong Kong Chapter Lead for SoGal, the largest global platform for the education and empowerment of diverse entrepreneurs and investors. (You can read more about SoGal’s mission in the New York Times.)

    If you live in or visit Stockholm, you’ve probably heard the voice of NYFA grad Emilie Olsson, a radio news anchor for Bauer Media, so it’s probably not surprising that she explored the relatively new field of podcasting. She created Älskade Psykopat (Beloved Psychopath).

    When asked about the podcast, Emilie says,”in the podcast we meet men and women who anonymously tell their story or experiences they’ve had with a psychopath or narcissist. It could be in a love relationship, family or at work. Here, real stories are highlighted that rarely can otherwise take place, and my hope is that the podcast will help, support and change!”

    She was also recently featured on the TV4 morning show in Stockholm. Congratulations Emilie!

    Imorse vad jag med i Nyhetsmorgon och berättade om min podd "Älskade Psykopat" som släpptes förra veckan! 🙂 I podden möter vi män och kvinnor som anonymt berättar sin historia eller erfarenheter de haft med en psykopat eller narcissist! Det kan vara inom en kärleksrelation, familjen och på jobbet. Här lyfts verkliga berättelser fram som sällan annars får ta plats och min förhoppning är att podden ska hjälpa, stötta och förändra! I veckans poddavsnitt möter vi Relationsexperten Michael Larsen som berättar mer om det här viktiga ämnet! Hela tv-inslaget finns att se här: https://www.tv4.se/nyhetsmorgon/klipp/att-dejta-en-psykopat-saknar-empati-12603932

    Posted by Emilie Olsson on Monday, May 4, 2020

    It is always exciting when the paths of two NYFA grads cross. Bryanna (“Red Carpet”) Reynolds moved from Melbourne to Los Angeles last year. And while LA is a big place, she found herself interviewing fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind. Alisa, now a published author, is using the communication skills she developed at NYFA as a life coach and motivational speaker.

    Bryanna Reynolds interviews fellow Broadcast Journalism alum Alisa Arvind

    This week we began offering a 4-Week Online Broadcast Journalism workshop. There are people around the world who want to study at NYFA. But for many, travel isn’t currently an option. Others need to stick close to home because of family commitments and work. Now there is a 4-Week Broadcast Journalism Workshop for them too.

    Faculty member Evgeniia Vlasova put together a fun little video about how we do distance learning at NYFA.

    As for me, I am hoping the barber shops open up again soon. My beard is taking on Santa Claus-like proportions…

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    May 15, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism • Views: 648

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Teaches Journalism Workshop in Nur-Sultan, Kazakhstan

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    New York Film Academy (NYFA) is an internationally recognized thought leader in the field of Broadcast Journalism. That status was recognized by the US State Department, which chose NYFA to conduct a week-long Journalism workshop for mid-career TV professionals in Nur-Sultan, the capital of the Central Asian country of Kazakhstan. Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer, and instructor Evgeniia Vlasova made the long journey from New York City to Kazakhstan just before Christmas, a time of year when Nur-Sultan is known for its bone chilling weather and frequent snow.

    The goal was not to teach “what to report.” Rather, the workshop was about innovative “ways to report.” It also avoided the typical teacher/student paradigm and instead was structured as colleagues sharing potentially useful information with colleagues. 

    Broadcast Journalism Kazakhstan Workshop

    Einreinhofer drew upon his US network television experience, using the PBS NewsHour and NBC’s Meet the Press as models for how to explore complicated, controversial subjects in a non-partisan and engaging way. Vlasova has seven years of TV experience in her native Russia, and is also a graduate of NYFA’s 1-Year Broadcast Journalism conservatory program. She literally spoke the same language as workshop participants. (Many people in Kazakhstan speak both Kazakh and Russian.)

    The culmination of the workshop saw the participants go into a TV studio and create a “pilot program” incorporating the techniques discussed during the week. Their success can be measured in the decision of a major Kazakh TV network to develop an entirely new political talk show based on that pilot.

    Einreinhofer and Vlasova will be returning to Kazakhstan next spring to teach a second workshop there. In July they will conduct a three-week Journalism Summer School in Moscow, aimed at early career journalists. Both projects are being sponsored by the US State Department.

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    January 6, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism, International Diversity • Views: 1179

  • “Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began” Previews at New York Film Academy (NYFA)

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    This is a big week for me, and for a group of instructors, here at the New York Film Academy (NYFA). On Wednesday, my latest documentary will make it’s US television premiere. And it could never have been made without the support of NYFA, and my fellow faculty members.

    Distributed by American Public Television, Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began will debut on WLIW/21 in New York on Wednesday, November 7 at 10pm. The following evening, November 8, the program will air on NJTV at 9pm and will be seen by viewers in New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia. (A schedule for key US markets can be found below.) Eventually we anticipate 200+ channels airing the program. 

    Following a six-month exclusive “window” for Public Television distribution, the documentary will become available on popular streaming services such as Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, and iTunes.

    Shanghai 1937

    Shanghai 1937

    World War II started in 1937? In China?

    Those are the provocative questions behind the new Public Television documentary Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began. While largely forgotten outside of China, the Battle of Shanghai in 1937 marked the first time the military forces of Imperial Japan came up against effective, ongoing resistance. The first American civilians killed in what would become World War II, as well as the first American serviceman, died in Shanghai during August 1937.

    In Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began, a group of internationally recognized historians and scholars describe how the events that took place in Shanghai pulled the world inevitably towards war, while at the same time instilling in the Chinese people a true sense of nationhood. The results of that transformation continue to be felt today. In fact, to understand contemporary Chinese attitudes and policies, you have to look to its past.

    Still, at its heart, this is the story of shattered lives and enduring dreams. That story is told in part by Liliane Willens, who at 92 years old is one of the few witnesses to these events still alive. She and her family were members of a community of stateless Russian Jews. Deemed “citizens of nowhere,” they were welcome to live in Shanghai, but could never leave.

    Shanghai’s large expat community controlled the city’s economy, living lives of privilege. War destroyed their world, and set the stage for the China of today. Liliane would eventually be admitted to the United States in 1951, and went on to teach at prestigious American colleges and universities. Today she is a lecturer and author, living in Washington, D.C.

    Production of Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began spanned three years and three continents. It incorporates little-seen footage located in film libraries around the world, as well as original interviews and scenic footage shot specifically for this documentary. Contributors include two of the leading Chinese experts on this subject: Su Zhiliang, Ph.D. of Shanghai Normal University and Ma Zhendu, Director of the Second Historical Archives of China, as well as Hans van de Ven, Ph.D. of the University of Cambridge in England, American military historian Edward Drea, Ph.D., and Danish historian and author Peter Harmsen.

    Teacher’s Notes written by Syd Golston, a past president of the National Council for the Social Studies, can be downloaded free of charge. Included in these materials are poems written by Chinese American author Wing Tek Lum. The Teacher’s Notes are at Shanghai1937.tv, where additional information about the program is also available along with a trailer.

    I am the Producer/Director of Shanghai 1937: Where World War II Began. Previously I developed and produced programming for PBS, CBS, ABC, HBO and Discovery. I’ve been telling stories about China for more than 25 years. My four-part documentary series tied to the 2008 Summer Olympics, Beyond Beijing, was seen in 43 countries by 250+ million viewers. I became Chair of the Broadcast Journalism school at the New York Film Academy in 2013.

    Co-Producer/Editor Evgenia Vlasova was the anchor and co-producer of an award-winning morning show in her native Russia. Born in the Russian Far East, she is no stranger to China. She too is a faculty member in the Broadcast Journalism department at the New York Film Academy.

    Digital Producer Theresa Loong traces her family heritage back to southern China. She is a multimedia producer and director based in New York.

    Associate Producer Nancy Hanzhang Shen previously worked in admissions and social media at NYFA. She is now a freelance video editor. NYFA audio instructor Dionysius Vlachos was the Supervising Sound Editor, NYFA editing instructor Lexi Phillips was the Colorist, and NYFA acting instructor Lea Tolub Brandenburg narrated key passages. Wenting Wu was the Graphic Designer. (That is her wonderful work that you see in the trailer, and the opening of the program.)

    Last Thursday we had a preview screening at NYFA, with our own version of a red carpet. Only at this event, it was the production personnel who took center stage.

    Shanghai 1937

    L to R: Bill Einreinhofer, Theresa Loong, Nancy Hanzhang Shen, Evgenia Vlasova

     

    Shanghai 1937

    L to R: Nancy Hanzhang Shen, Wenting Wu, Evgenia Vlasova, Bill Einreinhofer, Dee Vlachos

     


    U.S. TOP 50 MARKETS CARRIAGE
    (Partial list, all times are local. Some stations will air the program more than once.)

    New York
    WLIW Wednesday 11/7/18 @ 10p
    WNJB (NJTV) Thursday 11/8/18 @ 9p
    WNJN (NJTV) Thursday 11/8/18 @ 9p

    Los Angeles
    KLCS Tuesday 11/13/18 @ 9p
    KCET Tuesday 11/13/18 @ 8p

    Chicago
    WTTW Sunday 11/11/18 @ 5p

    Philadelphia
    WNJS (NJTV) Thursday 11/8/18 @ 9p
    WNJT (NJTV) Thursday 11/8/18 @ 9p

    San Francisco
    KQED Sunday 11/11/18 @ 7p
    KRCB Sunday 11/18/18 @ 10p

    Seattle
    KCTS Monday 11/12/18 @ 1p (Veterans Day programming)

    Miami
    WLRN Monday 11/12/18 @ 8p

    Denver
    KRMA Tuesday 11/20/18 @ 10p

    Orlando
    WEFS Sunday 11/11/18 @ 9p

    Charlotte
    WNSC Sunday 11/11/18 @ 2p

    Nashville
    WNPT Thursday 11/8/18 @ 11p

    Salt Lake City
    KUEN Wednesday 11/14/18 @ 9p

    Kansas City
    KCPT Sunday 11/11/18 @ 2p

    Cincinnati
    WCET Tuesday 12/4/18 @ 8p

    Greenville-Spartanburg
    WNEH Sunday 11/11/18 @ 2p

    Austin
    KLRU Thursday 11/8/18 @ 9p

    Albuquerque
    KENW Friday 11/9/18 @ 9p

    Louisville
    WKMJ Sunday 11/11/18 @10p

    Grand Rapids
    WGVK Sunday 11/11/18 @ 3p

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    November 6, 2018 • Broadcast Journalism, China, Documentary Filmmaking, Faculty Highlights • Views: 1929

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism Update: October 2, 2018

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    Last week was the first week for the new class of students attending the New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism school. On their third day of classes they were introduced to nonlinear video editing software. Yes, it was time to meet Avid Media Composer 8. And the first reactions were… positive. The credit goes to our fabulous Editing instructor Christine Schottanes, and our equally stellar TA and NYFA grad for making complicated software understandable.

    Broadcast Journalism Update

    The class has students from Zambia, New York City, Ukraine, Connecticut, England, China, Louisiana, Spain, and Brazil.

    Broadcast Journalism Update

    When I posted this on Facebook, I heard from NYFA grad Laura Isern. She was chosen from among more than a thousand applicants for a prestigious journalism training program run by Brazilian media giant Globo.

    She wrote: “I’m using Avid in my internship a lot. Classes were really helpful.”

    I also took part in a Virtual Open House last Wednesday. It was great to get questions from people everywhere, including some folks for whom it was the middle of the night. (Now that’s dedication…) If you were one of the participants, thanks for spending time with us. And if you have any additional questions, we’d be happy to answer them…
    Broadcast Journalism Update

    So the Broadcast Journalism camera classes Celina Liv Danielsen took as a student at NYFA came in handy last week. That’s her in the picture below, shooting (and producing) a story at the United Nations for Denmark TV 2.

    Broadcast Journalism Update
    And here is some of what she wrote to me…

    “…my new job title is journalist and producer for our US correspondent who is based in Washington DC. Together we are going to cover all US news for the people of Denmark. My job is to find all stories that we are going to produce for our newscast. I’m calling and finding all the sources, writing the manuscripts and articles, I’m the photographer when we are covering events where we are not making stories for our newscast but only covering it live. If my boss is on vacation or is doing other things then I’m reporting live to Danish national television. So I’m pretty busy and have a lot on my plate but it is so much fun. Since I got here I have only been in my apartment four times.  

    The first week was very hectic. I reported live from John McCain’s memorial in DC, then the Danish photographer and I flew to Boston to meet my boss (the US correspondent) to do a story there, then on to Toronto Film Festival and then San Francisco to cover the world’s first try to send out a machine in the ocean that can pick up all the plastic. Three days later we were in North Carolina covering the hurricane and this week was all about the UN. Next up is the midterm elections where we move out in “Trump land” to do many stories and then on election night a lot of live reporting. 

    I’m living in another city and get to travel all over America – it is so perfect. And I work with a very famous journalist from Denmark over here so people back home are starting to know my name in a bigger scale then before. Feel very lucky and blessed. But it took a lot of hard work

    WOW!

    Viviane Faver was a member of my very first class of 1-year Broadcast Journalism students in Fall 2013, after I had arrived at NYFA just a little more than a year earlier. Well I am still in New York, and so is Viviane. Last week she was doing what we in the business call a “cross-platform” story. It will appear in a Brazilian newspaper, a magazine, and on a website. Here is how she summed up the experience on Facebook:

    “I just had the pleasure of interviewing the CEO of @Climategroup, Helen Clarkson. ‘As countries step up to drive down emissions it’s important not to leave others behind. We need to ensure a fair and just transition to a clean economy that benefits us all.’”

    That’s Viviane on the right, in the picture below…
    Broadcast Journalism Update

    Thanks to LinkedIn, each morning I get to see the latest edition of GeekWire, hosted by NYFA grad Starla Sampaco. (Not “Sanpan,” as the autocorrect on my email keeps changing it to.) Last week she was reporting on how the cofounders of Instagram were leaving the company. But with all the talk about “fake news,” I have some questions, Starla… That’s a whole lot of blue sky behind you. I thought it rained in Washington State every day…

    Broadcast Journalism Update

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    October 2, 2018 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1814

  • Broadcast Journalism Summer School, Wind Summer Festival, and Invisible Love From the New York Film Academy

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    Summer is well underway here in New York City, and that means the NYFA Broadcast Journalism Summer Session is in full swing too. Once again this year, we have students from seemingly everywhere: Abu Dhabi, Brazil, Connecticut, Uzbekistan, and Washington, D.C.! Below is the “Official Unofficial Class Picture.”
    On Saturday, the group was outdoors practicing their shooting technique. (Which was good, seeing as today they are shooting their first project!) Our students work with Canon C300 cameras, which are better than the equipment many TV stations actually use. Battery Park, located right across the street from NYFA, is a great location to shoot. Especially on a lovely Summer day.
    Trust me, as serious as the folks in the picture below look, the short-term workshops really are fun. (NYFA grads reading this email can back me upon this…)
    Speaking of having fun …
    NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Chiara Carcano is one of the hosts of the Wind Summer Festival, a combination performance series and singing contest seen on Canale 5 and heard on the Radio 105 network in Italy. (The skills you learn at NYFA don’t always lead to newsroom careers — they can be used in a variety of ways!) This is also an example of how English remains the linqua franca for many international cultural events.
    As most of you reading this know, I have spent my professional career creating non-fiction video. But that has changed, as I’m now part of the creative team producing an independent feature film called Invisible Love. In fact, I am an executive producer. (Nothing like starting at the top…) A China/Vietnam/U.S. co-production, I got involved thanks to the work I did in China last year for my soon-to-be-released documentary Shanghai: 1937. I have to say, it’s exciting to see my name on a movie poster.
    That poster makes it clear this is a drama. The story takes place in what was then called French Indochina, during the 1930s.
    NYFA Acting for Film grad Kazy Tauginas has been cast in a major role. He plays an American doctor haunted by his troubled past, whose involvement with a Vietnamese nurse leads to tragedy. (You can see Kazy in the new Denzel Washington film The Equalizer 2.)
    The Invisible Love team had a booth at the film market associated with the just completed Shanghai International Film Festival (SIFF). We’re looking for theatrical presentation in China and Vietnam, as well as international theatrical and TV distribution.
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  • New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism School’s Last Weekly Update of 2017

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    As this is the final Weekly Update for 2017, I wanted to tell you about what some of the NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduates have been doing recently…

    Celina Liv Danielsen is one of the hardest working people I ever met, and that hard work has apparently paid off. I heard from her last week via Facebook: “I have been working at the Danish television company TV2 for a year now, and I just found out that I’m among (together with a colleague) a nominee for the Best News Story of the Year at the award show ‘TV Prisen 2018.’ I just wanted to thank you and the school for teaching me so much…”

    Congratulations, Celina! Not bad for one year on the job…

     

     

    Meanwhile, more recent alum Melissa Aleman is now working on “Somos Texas,” a series that airs on Azteca TV. And her most recent story has a definite holiday theme: “Don’t miss out on the best location to take your selfie this Christmas! Today I’ll be showing you the place that has more than 4 million Christmas lights! Don’t miss a brand new holiday edition of #SomosTexas only on #azteca.”

    Want to find out about the plot of the next blockbuster film in the Jurassic Park series, “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom”? NYFA grad Daniella Gemignani interviewed director A.J Bayona for Globo TV in Brazil.

    Bryanna Reynolds recently interviewed international entertainment legend Kylie Minogue at the Melbourne premiere of the “Swinging Safari,” which Bryanna describes as “an Australian comedy.”  It’s a coming-of-age film that takes place in the 1970s.

    When Elina Mukherjee went to Times Square to report a NYFA student project earlier this year, she had no idea it would turn out to be a job interview for TV Asia USA. Someone from the New Jersey-based programming service saw her doing her stand-up, and he was so impressed he offered her a job as a freelance reporter after she graduated. Her first assignment is the Global Healthcare Summit taking place in India. Then she will be reporting stories from Long Island, which is a suburb of New York City. Congratulations, Elina!
    Finally, on a personal note, it was an amazing year. I never dreamed I’d be asked to participate in the international version of a major CCTV cultural history series … and end up as the host. The six-part documentary series is headed to the MIPTV international TV market in Cannes next April.
    Have a wonderful holiday, whatever tradition(s) you follow, and I’ll be back next year with more news about the NYFA Broadcast Journalism department.
    Until then, stay tuned!
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  • Demo Reels Demystified with New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer

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    As much fun as it can be to watch contestants struggle on “American Idol” or “The Voice,” we never want to experience that kind of rejection in our own real-life “auditions” for in the news industry. Broadcast journalists know right off the bat that the most important tool in a job search — besides strong instincts, cutting-edge skills, and hard work — is a persuasive demo reel that demonstrates the outstanding talent and skills you can bring to an organization.

    But in a deeply competitive market, what makes a broadcast journalism reel truly fantastic? How can broadcast journalists set themselves apart? At the New York Film Academy, Broadcast Journalism Department Chair Bill Einreinhofer believes in sharing precisely this kind of up-to-date industry insight with his students.

    “A great reel looks and sounds distinctive,” he explains. “That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.”

    NYFA alumna Lara Gato.

    Many have heard the common advice that busy news producers and station directors will probably only spend a few seconds watching your reel and then stop if they’re not hooked. So you put your best material first on the reel to get them to actually watch your, and call you in for an interview … but how do you know what material is your best material? How do you make your reel better? Who should you work with to put the reel together?

    Questions like this are important for even experienced journalists to take a moment to consider when putting together their reel. Mr. Einreinhofer took the time to share some examples of great NYFA alumni reels, together with insights about crafting the strongest reels with the NYFA Blog. Check out stellar reel examples from NYFA alumni Lara Gato and Alyssa Cruz, along with Mr. Einreinhofer’s advice on crafting a winning broadcast journalism reel.

    NYFA alumna Alyssa Cruz.

    NYFA Blog: What separates a great broadcast journalism reel from a decent reel?

    BE: A great reel looks and sounds distinctive. That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.

    You don’t save your best for the end. Rather, you put it at the very top. Otherwise, whoever is screening the reel will likely never see it. In addition, “one size does not fit all.” Just as you tailor your resume to match a job posting, your reel should reflect the elements and abilities that are mentioned in that posting.

    NYFA: Can a student create a great reel on their own, or should they work with others — and who?

    BE: It is always a good idea to discuss a reel with your colleagues, friends and (if you have one) your mentor. What might seem clear and easy-to-understand could, in fact, be less than obvious. “Fresh eyes” are always valuable.

    NYFA: Why does the reel matter so much for broadcast journalists? What’s its purpose?

    BE: The reel doesn’t get you the job. The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.

    NYFA: What’s the difference between a student reel and a professional reel? What do industry insiders look for?

    BE: For on-air talent, the key is to be authentically yourself. Television is a personality-driven medium, and that continues to hold true even today when many people watch “television” on a variety of mobile devices, but not a television.

    The one thing that makes you different from all the other people applying for the job you want if your own uniqueness. Use that to your advantage, so you will stand out from the crowd.


    Ready to learn more about crafting an incredible reel and polishing your skills as a broadcast journalist? Apply today for the New York Film Academy’s Broadcast Journalism School.

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  • NYFA Broadcast Journalism School Weekly Updates Aug. 21

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    Those of you who are especially observant — and I am sure that includes all NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduates — may have noticed that this edition of the Weekly Update arrived quite late on Monday. (Or, for those across the International Dateline, on Tuesday.) The reason was that I spent the past weekend shooting material for an upcoming documentary project called “Shanghai: 1937.”

    Earlier this year, I was in China shooting the host segments for the international version of the CCTV cultural documentary series “Masters of the Century.” While there, I lectured at the Beijing Film Academy, in my capacity as the Chair of the NYFA Broadcast Journalism program. And I also did groundwork for “Shanghai: 1937.” (Broadcast journalists invented the concept of “multitasking.”) The first week of September, I will be in China shooting original interviews and scenic footage for “Shanghai: 1937,” as well as again visiting several universities representing NYFA.
    The Battle of Shanghai took place during the late Summer and early Fall of 1937. It has been called the last battle of World War I, and the first battle of World War II. Largely unknown outside of China, it set the stage for later Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor, Singapore, Malaya, Hong Kong and the Philippines. But for four long years, China stood alone.
    This past Sunday, I interviewed a 92 year-old witness to the Battle of Shanghai. Her name is Liliane Willens, and she is the author of the amazing book “Stateless in Shanghai.” She and her family were Russian Jewish refugees, allowed to live in Shanghai but unable to leave, as they had no citizenship papers or passports.
     Monday morning, I interviewed military historian Edward Drea. He is one of the editors of “The Battle for China,” widely considered the definitive work on the Sino-Japanese War. He was formerly the head of the Research and Analysis Department at the U.S. Army Center of Military History in Washington, D.C. and taught at the U.S. Army War College.
    In Shanghai I will interview Prof. Su Zhiliang of Shanghai Normal University, an expert on the Battle of Shanghai. Prof. Su has lectured throughout China, and overseas, and is the author of numerous books, monographs and journal articles.
    I’ll also be shooting at key Shanghai locations including the Sihang Warehouse, where a company of Chinese troops — given what seemed a suicide mission — held back a Japanese army.
    In the end, however, this is a story of shattered lives and enduring dreams. The events of “Shanghai, 1937” continue to echo today and underlie many Chinese attitudes and beliefs. If you want to understand contemporary China, you must first understand its history.
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