Karen Hua
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  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism Update – June 5, 2019

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    Three years ago, New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism students Alisa Arvind and Urvashi Ward made history. They became fully credentialed White House reporters—not “student reporters,” but full-fledged reporters, just like the folks from ABC, CBS, CNN, Fox, and NBC. 

    They were reporting for NYFA News. That’s right, the news magazine produced by students in the 1-Year Broadcast Journalism Conservatory program! Not only that, they were also the first students of any journalism school to accompany the American President on an overseas trip. Think about that for a moment.—we/they accomplished something that had never been done before, or since.

    Broadcast Journalism Update - June 6, 2019
    Broadcast Journalism Update - June 6, 2019

    What Alisa and Urvashi did speaks to the quality of the course-of-study here at NYFA. It is also an example of the type of persistence that journalism requires. It took them months of emails and phone calls to get official accreditation. Then, one morning they started to receive the President’s daily schedule in their NYFA email account. Truly amazing…

    It’s also the first anniversary of Karen Hua starting as a reporter at KGET in Bakersfield, California. Karen is a graduate of our 12-Week Evening Broadcast Journalism workshop. That’s where she learned how to report, shoot, write, and edit. (Of course, she also needed determination, but she had already walked through the door with that…)

    To mark the past year, Karen put together a video of 365 “moments,” one for each story she reported. Most are wonderful, a few cringe-worthy, and a bunch are really funny. Watching it, you can see her build a body of work, which will eventually lead her to a job in a larger city/market.

    Finally, it is just about six years since I responded to an online job posting for a new Broadcast Journalism department Chair at the New York Film Academy. Answering that ad, quite literally, changed my life. Today I get the chance to do the two things I love the most—teach and create compelling nonfiction video. So to everyone at NYFA—administration, faculty, staff, students—past and present…Thanks!

    Broadcast Journalism Update - June 6, 2019
    Stay Tuned,

    Bill

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    June 5, 2019 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 322

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism Alumni Cover California Wildfires 

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    As anyone who follows American media knows, stories about President Donald Trump and his administration have monopolized the news for months. But this week, an even bigger story dominated the headlines. Two massive California wildfires, one in the mountains of Northern California and the second in coastal Southern California, have devastated communities and resulted (as of today) in the deaths of more than 50 people. An additional 100+ people are missing.

    News coverage of these tragedies has served an important public service function. And two New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism school graduates are on the scene, documenting the fires and their aftermath.

    NYFA alum Celina Liv Danielsen, along with photographer Thomas Hass, are there working for the Danish television network DK2. Earlier this week, they visited what remained of a small Northern California town ironically called Paradise. It wasn’t an easy assignment, one which takes an emotional as well as physical toll…

    Broadcast Journalism Update Celina Liv Danielsen

    Celina Liv Danielsen

    Karen Hua is also a NYFA graduate. She is reporter with the NBC TV station in the Southern California city of Bakersfield. While not threatened by fire — at least not yet — area residents have experienced the side effects of these blazes for months. Karen wrote earlier this week:

    “The fires in Southern California are relatively close to us in Bakersfield. We’re a 2-hour drive from the Ventura/Malibu area, and we’ve been covering them extensively…

    “Ultimately I’m okay, and everyone in Bakersfield is safe — there aren’t too many trees in our city to spread flames. However, we’ve seen toxic air quality and heat as a result of the fires around the state this year. This summer was terrible with the Carr, Medicino, and Ferguson Fires. There were days when the entire city was advised to stay indoors. But we are fortunate we are all safe.”

    Broadcast Journalism Update Karen Hua

    Karen Hua

    There are many ways to cover the same story. A digital producer/editor, working at ABC News headquarters in New York, created a powerful story for the ABC late night news program Nightline. The story, distributed over multiple platforms, captured the sheer terror of what is taking place…

    Broadcast Journalism Update

    Public Television took a somewhat different approach. Friend and former colleague Miles O’Brian was in California shooting material for an upcoming episode of the popular Nova science series. While his focus was on previous wildfires, he and his team found themselves in the middle of a new “mega-fire,” an event so large that it literally creates its own weather. Miles was interviewed  on the PBS NewsHour, for which I once produced.

    Broadcast Journalism Update

    As commentator Richard Reinhold noted earlier this year in TVNewsCheck, increasingly local TV news reporters are becoming “first responders,” often arriving on the scene of major events at the same time (or even before) police, fire, and emergency medical teams. 

    That’s why it is so important that we get the story right. People will act on the information we give them. We have to make sure it is accurate.

    Broadcast Journalism Update

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    November 16, 2018 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1088

  • SnapChat Breaking News, NBC Bakersfield and More: Updates From New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism School

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    I have said before — and I’m about to say again — that I have “seen the future” of electronic journalism, and it is “on the phone.”
    The folks at NowThis were among the first companies to build a business on this realization. The notion began at the HuffPost, when that successful online publication decided to start producing full motion video. But it chose to emulate MSNBC’s liberal-chat format. (A decision that proved wrong…) That led a key member of the creative team to jump ship, and help create NowThis, which targets people who get their news on the phone.

    Last week Axios reported that NowThis is launching a breaking news channel on Snapchat. Why? Because, increasingly, people don’t view news “on the phone.” Rather, they view news via an app on their phone. And what better app to ally themselves with than Snapchat? It looks to be a very smart move…

    Meanwhile Ad Age, an old-style print magazine about the advertising industry that has reinvented itself as an online source of media information, reports that Google is stepping up its game when it comes to covering news. The Google Newsstand app is said to be on the way out, and a new app is on the way which will be faster and have more video content. Full-motion video is the “secret sauce” that attracts digital viewers. Printed pages with the occasional photo or graphic, not so much. This is why we teach NYFA Broadcast Journalism students to be multimedia Journalists (MMJs).
    The Poynter Institute is one of the leading journalism research institutes in the United States. A recent post had the headline, New York Times Co. is dipping a toe into television production. There are two fascinating aspects to this story. The first is that The Times is using digital platforms (podcasts, feature-style films) not to report the news, but to bolster their image as an outstanding source of unbiased reporting. They don’t see these efforts as potential profit centers as much as ways of shaping public perceptions about The Times. It is certainly not conventional television news.
    And that’s the second tantalizing aspect of the story. Unreported — and perhaps unknown to the reporter — was that The Times started a subsidiary to produce long-form TV news programming back in the 1990s. For a variety of reasons, it didn’t work out. Its founder, a long-time friend and former PBS colleague, would go on to do quite well sans The Times. You may have heard of a little thing he helped create called NY1?
    And speaking of news, we got some last week from NYFA graduate Karen Hua. She just got her first on-air reporting job:
    Some personal breaking news … In just two weeks, I’ll be starting as an on-air reporter for the NBC station in Bakersfield, California! Thank you to my mentors, teachers, and dearest friends for supporting and encouraging me this past year … ENDLESS thanks, Bill. Can’t say it enough —  literally would not be here without you, or Evgenia!  

    NYFA Broadcast Journalism alum Karen Hua.

    I should point out that Karen is a graduate of our 12-week Evening Broadcast Journalism program. Proof that, if you want to reinvent yourself while working a day job, learning key content creation skills can help you get to where you want to go. (In this case, Bakersfield, California … which I am confident is just the first step up the ladder, and back to NYC!)
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    May 7, 2018 • Academic Programs, Broadcast Journalism • Views: 1094