NYFA Broadcast Journalism
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  • Celebrating the Graduates of NYFA’s Moscow Journalism Summer School (JSS)

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    Last Friday, Evgeniia Vlasova and I wrapped up a three-day online follow-up to last August’s Moscow Journalism Summer School (JSS). We ended early afternoon New York time, early evening Moscow time and after midnight Siberia time. About two-thirds of the JSS Summer attendees participated at some point over the three days. Some had personal obligations that precluded them from attending. One is a physician, once again treating desperately ill COVID-19 patients.

    Each of the workshop participants produced a story on the theme “2020: The Year No One Expected.” While they all had a common subject, each approached the assignment in a unique way. Genia and I were very impressed by the maturity of the presentations. They were definitely better than what they did last August, although those were pretty good too.

    Here is a link to one of the stories. It is indicative of the enterprise and hard work of the program participants. Below is a “graduation photo” from last Friday.

    We had two guest speakers. Jeff Platt is a general assignment reporter in Bakersfield, California. We invited him to talk about practicing digital journalism when you have limited resources. The other guest was Lara Gato, a NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduate and a Producer with CBSN, the digital streaming service of CBS News. We discussed the differences in producing stories for broadcast/cable television and digital platforms.

    Gillian Kemmerer, Host of The Faceoff & Ice Diaries, guest lectured this Summer and tweeted out her support of the incredible NYFA Moscow Broadcast Journalism students.

    One of the differences between August and January was a more pronounced emphasis on career development. For the final session, each participant answered four questions:

    1. Where do you want to be in one year?
    2. Where do you want to be in three years?
    3. What do you have to do to reach these goals?
    4. What is one concrete step that you can take in the next two months to advance your career?

    These folks gave up part of their Christmas vacations to attend this workshop. I think it is indicative of the value they assign to the Moscow JSS. We ended by asking them to recommend friends and colleagues who would be suitable candidates for the NYFA Moscow JSS II.

    In July, four of the JSS I participants will be in New York for four weeks to study at NYFA. All travel, housing, meal, and tuition costs will be paid by the U.S. State Department.

    In August 2021, we will be holding JSS II. Ideally in Moscow, otherwise online. It too will be fully funded by the State Department.

    For more information on NYFA’s Broadcast Journalism School, click here.

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  • NYFA Broadcast Journalism: August 2020 Updates

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    Having “Guest Speakers” for instructional classes isn’t unusual. But it is unique when the guest calls-in from the middle of a raging wildfire she is covering in Southern California…

    NYFA alum Karen Hua

    Late Monday, after putting in a full day at KGET in Bakersfield, NYFA alum Karen Hua was sent to cover a wildfire burning out of control. It meant doing live shoots that evening, sleeping in the station SUV, and doing more live shoots Tuesday morning.

    NYFA alum Karen Hua

    She found time to share with the NYFA Broadcast Journalism Summer School participants what it is like to work as a multimedia journalist (MMJ), the challenges of meeting deadlines and how it really is a very small world. (Her roommate is a reporter at a rival TV station in Bakersfield.) If you want a role model, someone who embodies contemporary TV journalism in the United States, I can’t think of anyone who better fits the bill than Karen. Note she is wearing high-visibility fire gear…
    Fifteen years ago I created a documentary that still remains special to me…

    Still from ‘So Very Far From Home’

    August 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II. It also marks the 75th anniversary of an amazing rescue. During the final days of World War II, small groups of specially trained American troops parachuted into prison camps in Japanese-occupied China, liberating innocent children, their parents, teachers and friends. They had been imprisoned for the “crime” of being American, British, Australian and Dutch, confined to camps where hunger, disease, brutality and despair were their everyday companions.

    ‘So Very Far From Home’ title card

    These are the real-life stories behind Steven Spielberg’s epic film “Empire of the Sun,” as told by those who actually lived them.
    Decades later, those now-grown children still felt Very Far From Home. Because, to them, “home” would always be China. See their stories now on Vimeo.
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    August 10, 2020 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1102

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism Update – October 23, 2018

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    Last week, my long time friend and former colleague Grace Wong (currently of ABC News) contacted me about the New York Press Club Foundation’s Annual Conference on Journalism, asking if any New York Film Academy (NYFA) Broadcast Journalism students would like to attend.

    Broadcast Journalism

    Well it didn’t take long to find out that a number of students did indeed want to go. So, under the leadership of faculty member Evgenia Vlasova, early on Saturday, October 13 they made their way to the NYC conference site. 

    Besides getting to meet practicing national and New York area journalists, they had an opportunity to chat with the guest speakers as well. That included Jill Colvin, who is White House correspondent for the Associated Press. You can only imagine the stories she had to tell, given that she started covering Donald Trump when he was just one of many candidates seeking to be the Republican nominee for President.

    That’s Jill, third from the right, with Genia and some of the NYFA students:

    Broadcast Journalism

    Students also met Kathryn Dill, who is an editor at CNBC Digital, where she oversees coverage of careers, the workforce, and women in business, for what is primarily a millennial audience.

    That’s Kathryn in the middle:
    Broadcast Journalism

    These days, some journalists work in the so-called “gig economy” not out of necessity, but by choice. Creating content for a wide range of outlets sometimes offers more income security than being tied to a single platform. (Just ask newspaper reporters…)

    Lisa Armstrong is an award-winning journalist with credits from The New York Times, The Daily Beast, Rolling Stone, and other publications and websites. She has reported from several counties, including Haiti from 2010-2014. She is on the left in the picture below:
    Broadcast Journalism

    This is why it is so important to study in New York. There are opportunities here you just can’t find anywhere else…

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    October 23, 2018 • Broadcast Journalism, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 1916

  • Green Screen & Graduation for the New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism Fall 2017 Cohort

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    It is almost graduation day for the Fall 2017 1-year Broadcast Journalism students. Last week, they were in the studio for the final time, recording special material for their resume reels. This week will be consumed by editing, editing, editing, and editing. Graduation is at 10 a.m. on Friday.
    We use a “green screen effect” to create our “virtual” news set. That means the only things that are “real” are the chairs, desk and (of course) air talent…
    In the Control Room, and when the show hits “air,” it looks a lot different…
    Still, there’s nothing quite as nice as an “anchor” close-up…
    Even a few minutes before going “on set,” students are still rehearsing. In this case, in the hall outside the studio. (And if she wants to delete any part of the script, the waste basket is immediately to her left.)
    When it all comes together, it is the closest thing to “magic.”
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    May 23, 2018 • Academic Programs, Broadcast Journalism • Views: 1734

  • PBS NewsHour’s Jane Ferguson Visits New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism School

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    As an international correspondent for the PBS NewsHour, Jane Ferguson is always on the go. This month, she found time in her busy schedule to visit New York, so that she could meet with the Broadcast Journalism students at the New York Film Academy.

    Based in Beirut, Jane currently covers stories in the Middle East, as well as portions of Africa and South Asia. After screening examples of her work, she explained to the students the “story behind the story” — what it took to first find, then report, shoot and edit these reports.

    She also discussed a concern shared by all students: “How do you get your first job?”

    One of the highlights of the session was an opportunity for students to talk one-on-one with Jane, where she answered their individual questions as well as helped them practice the essential art of “networking.”

    Jane’s visit was one of a series of unique experiences available exclusively to students in NYFA’s 1-Year Broadcast Journalism Conservatory program. In addition to meeting outstanding news reporters, producers and executives, students also get behind-the-scenes tours of NBC News and other major New York City production facilities.

    The New York Film Academy thanks Jane Ferguson for sharing her expertise with our students.

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    March 21, 2018 • Academic Programs, Broadcast Journalism, Guest Speakers • Views: 3021

  • Alumnae at Globo, AOL, and More: Broadcast Journalism School Jan. 29 Weekly Updates

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    Those of you who have studied in the NYFA Broadcast Journalism program know we believe that journalism is different from most other professions. Journalists have special duties, special responsibilities.

    Last week, an Assistant Attorney General in the state of Michigan spoke of the role of journalists in society.

    “We as a society need investigative journalists more than ever,” Assistant Attorney General Angela Povilaitis told the judge at the sentencing hearing of Larry Nassar, the long-time doctor for the U.S. Women’s Gymnastics Team.

    Nassar, 54, admitted sexually assaulting athletes under the guise of medical treatment when he was employed by Michigan State University and USA Gymnastics, which trains Olympians. Judge Rosemarie Aquilina sentenced him Wednesday to 40 to 175 years in prison in a case involving seven victims, and he faces sentencing next week in a neighboring Michigan county where he abused girls at a gymnastics club. He already had been sentenced to 60 years in prison for child pornography.

    The case began with a 2016 Indianapolis Star investigation of how USA Gymnastics handled sexual abuse allegations against coaches. That prompted former gymnast Rachael Denhollander to alert the newspaper to Nassar’s abuse. “After that article, I knew this was the time,” Denhollander told The Associated Press. “This is always what I knew had to be done … (and) I was 100 percent confident there were other victims speaking up and being silenced.”

    This is why what we do is important.
    It also points to the crucial role played by the Associated Press. They took a story that was reported by a regional newspaper, and distributed it to newspapers, TV stations, TV networks, cable news outlets, online platforms and radio stations across the United States as well as around the world. News agencies like the AP began in the 19th century, yet they still remain relevant today.
    Last week I heard from one of our Brazilian graduates Laura Isern, who sent me an email, with an update on her career. Here is what she wrote:
    Well, last year I was glad to tell you I was about to start working for Globo magazines … I’ve been through several tests and interviews, and surpassed 24 thousand other candidates. Now I’m one of the six journalism interns at Globo. In this internship program we’ll be going through all areas on audiovisual journalism and the skills you taught us will be very helpful! Thanks again for everything.
    One of six individuals selected out of a total of 24,000 applicants … Now that’s impressive! Congratulations, Laura!
    Staying with the Brazilian theme, I also heard from Brazilian NYFA alum Amanda Salvato. Amanda is based in New York now, and she is regularly covering New York Fashion Week events.
    You can see her work on Amazon and AOL.
    In my memory, though, I still see Amanda at the New York Hilton Hotel on Election Night 2016, reporting on one of the most unexpected U.S. Presidential Election victories in history for our very own “NYFA News.” Great job, Amanda!
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  • New York Film Academy Alum Hired by CBS News and Trained by Fellow Alum

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    This week, 2017 NYFA Broadcast Journalism graduate Lara Gato began work as an Associate Producer at CBS News. To add to what is already a proud moment for her alma mater, Gato is being trained by 2015 NYFA Broadcast Journalism grad Nour Idriss.

    Lara Gato  came to the New York Film Academy from her home in Madrid, Spain, to pursue her dream to become a journalist. Her fantastic work was recently featured on the NYFA Blog as a standout example of a professional reel.

    NYFA Alumna and CBS News Associate Producer Lara Gato

    “The reel doesn’t get you the job,” NYFA Chair of Broadcast Journalism Bill Einreinhoffer explained to the NYFA Blog. “The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.”

    Nour Idriss, who is training Gato at CBS News, moved to New York City from her home in Aleppo, Syria. It was while still completing her program at NYFA that Nour was encouraged by a NYFA guest speaker to apply for work at CBS News. She used a story she did as a NYFA student to help secure a role. She works both in the production team for “The CBS Evening News Weekend Edition” and as a freelance associate producer for video at CBS.com.

    With “The CBS Evening News,” Idriss told the NYFA Blog she produces and edits VO’s, teases, and packages, overseeing headlines and assisting with gathering research and material. On the digital side at CBS.com, she During the uses a suite of software to publish web content.

    The New York Film Academy congratulates Lara Gato and Nour Idriss for their success and looks forward to hearing more from them at CBS News.

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  • New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism School Visits NBC News

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    So, for graduates of the NYFA 1-Year Broadcast Journalism program, these pictures should bring back some memories!

    This month, the Fall 2017 1-Year students got an exclusive “behind the scenes” look at NBC News. It was all made possible by NBC News military affairs contributor Col. Jack Jacobs, who is also Chair of the NYFA Veteran’s Advancement program.

    While visiting NBC News, the students had the opportunity to meet MSNBC anchor Joy Reid.

    Then, they visited the set of her program “AM Joy,” while the show was in progress.

    Since prime time anchor Lester Holt was off, the NYFA students decided to help out as “substitute anchors” on the set of the “NBC Nightly News.”

    …and made a quick visit to make-up.

    They even had to chance to visit the set of “Saturday Night Live” during rehearsals. (You can hear the band playing here.)

    In fact, they even found out about some of the jokes on that night’s show, 10 hours before air time!

    These tours are available only to students in the NYFA Broadcast Journalism 1-Year Conservatory program. This group seems to have had fun…

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  • Demo Reels Demystified with New York Film Academy Broadcast Journalism Chair Bill Einreinhofer

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    As much fun as it can be to watch contestants struggle on “American Idol” or “The Voice,” we never want to experience that kind of rejection in our own real-life “auditions” for in the news industry. Broadcast journalists know right off the bat that the most important tool in a job search — besides strong instincts, cutting-edge skills, and hard work — is a persuasive demo reel that demonstrates the outstanding talent and skills you can bring to an organization.

    But in a deeply competitive market, what makes a broadcast journalism reel truly fantastic? How can broadcast journalists set themselves apart? At the New York Film Academy, Broadcast Journalism Department Chair Bill Einreinhofer believes in sharing precisely this kind of up-to-date industry insight with his students.

    “A great reel looks and sounds distinctive,” he explains. “That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.”

    NYFA alumna Lara Gato.

    Many have heard the common advice that busy news producers and station directors will probably only spend a few seconds watching your reel and then stop if they’re not hooked. So you put your best material first on the reel to get them to actually watch your, and call you in for an interview … but how do you know what material is your best material? How do you make your reel better? Who should you work with to put the reel together?

    Questions like this are important for even experienced journalists to take a moment to consider when putting together their reel. Mr. Einreinhofer took the time to share some examples of great NYFA alumni reels, together with insights about crafting the strongest reels with the NYFA Blog. Check out stellar reel examples from NYFA alumni Lara Gato and Alyssa Cruz, along with Mr. Einreinhofer’s advice on crafting a winning broadcast journalism reel.

    NYFA alumna Alyssa Cruz.

    NYFA Blog: What separates a great broadcast journalism reel from a decent reel?

    BE: A great reel looks and sounds distinctive. That separates it from the dozens of other reels someone looking to make a hire has to screen.

    You don’t save your best for the end. Rather, you put it at the very top. Otherwise, whoever is screening the reel will likely never see it. In addition, “one size does not fit all.” Just as you tailor your resume to match a job posting, your reel should reflect the elements and abilities that are mentioned in that posting.

    NYFA: Can a student create a great reel on their own, or should they work with others — and who?

    BE: It is always a good idea to discuss a reel with your colleagues, friends and (if you have one) your mentor. What might seem clear and easy-to-understand could, in fact, be less than obvious. “Fresh eyes” are always valuable.

    NYFA: Why does the reel matter so much for broadcast journalists? What’s its purpose?

    BE: The reel doesn’t get you the job. The reel gets you the interview which can get you the job. It is the ticket that gets you in the door.

    NYFA: What’s the difference between a student reel and a professional reel? What do industry insiders look for?

    BE: For on-air talent, the key is to be authentically yourself. Television is a personality-driven medium, and that continues to hold true even today when many people watch “television” on a variety of mobile devices, but not a television.

    The one thing that makes you different from all the other people applying for the job you want if your own uniqueness. Use that to your advantage, so you will stand out from the crowd.


    Ready to learn more about crafting an incredible reel and polishing your skills as a broadcast journalist? Apply today for the New York Film Academy’s Broadcast Journalism School.

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