Faculty Highlights
Category

  • New York Film Academy Los Angeles (NYFA-LA) Photography Department – Fall 2019 Newsletter

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Amanda and PDN 

    Our full-time faculty Amanda Rowan has won the prestigious PDN Curator Award. This is a biennial award given to five photographers for exceptional fine art images. Rowan received this year’s recognition for her photo project Ritual. This series examines the intersection of seduction, mysticism, and performance within the realm of modern reproductive politics and traditional mating rituals.

    Rowan attended the opening and week-long group show in New York City this past month. Photo District News produced the event, led by Holly Hughes. The group show was curated by:

    Brent Beamon, Director of Flowers Gallery – NYC
    Coco Conry, Gallery Director of Jackson Fine Art
    Pauline Vermare, Cultural Director of Magnum Photos New York

    The images from the winning photographers was published in October’s issue of PDN, focusing on fine art photography. 

    FAYN exhibition 

    FAYN’s latest iteration The Unseen Body arrived in September. We had a great turnout celebrating the launch of Issue #006! We exhibited the work in our Photo Arts Gallery, Los Angeles, and gave free copies of the magazine to all attendees. 

    The Unseen Body was inspired by the need for diversity in the representation of the human body in mainstream media. We hope to prompt deep discussions about how, as global imagemakers, we use our medium to make images of meaning. Our bodies carry us from our first day to our last. They are the holders of our stories; every blemish, scar, and mark is a part of us. Our bodies are inherently and uniquely our own and cannot be duplicated. And yet daily we are bombarded with images that tell us otherwise.

    Magazines available for sale HERE. 

    Lane Barden – The Elevated Eye: Aerial Photography Past and Present

    Lane Barden’s current exhibition at the Forest Lawn Museum examines the history of aerial photography, from its origins in the nineteenth century to the boundary-pushing technologies of the 21st century. It assembles nearly 150 images and 14 minutes of video, as well as satellite models and drones. 

    The exhibition includes photographs from Forest Lawn Museum’s permanent collection that have never been displayed, as well as works from the Getty Research Institute; Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens; and the Special Collections of Los Angeles Public Library. The Elevated Eye: Aerial Photography Past and Present also features the work of David Maisel, a 2018 Guggenheim Fellow in the Creative Arts and Jenny Odell, a multi-disciplinary artist and writer. The exhibition includes more than twenty images and mesmerizing video footage by the drone pilot and photographer Chen Ming. Moving beyond the stratosphere, The Elevated Eye features historical images from NASA as well as the work of Erwan Rivault, a French geographer who uses data from European Space Agency satellites to create stunning images of natural wonders on the Earth’s surface.

    The Elevated Eye: Aerial Photography Past and Present will be open to the public from October 10, 2019 – March 8, 2020
    Forest Lawn Museum, Forest Lawn-Glendale
    1712 S. Glendale Avenue
    Glendale, California

    Photo LA

    This year the Photo Arts Conservatory will exhibiting and putting on educational programming at Photo LA. Photo LA is a collaborative platform that links the international photography community–world-class artists / photographers, galleries, dealers, and publishers. This four-day event takes place January 30 – February 2nd, 2020 at The Historic Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, CA.

    In addition to exhibiting student and faculty work, educational panels will be part of the event:

    Friday Jan. 31, 1:30 p.m. – 3 p.m.
    Artist and Curator: Lane Barden and Getty Curator discuss Lane’s work in the Monumentaily exhibition at the Getty. The curator will also break down how the show was curated. 

    Saturday Feb. 1,  4 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.
    Social Media Giants: Thoughts and Advice on Instagram
    Baz Here (MFA student at PhotoArts) and Alejandro Ibarra (MFA Alumni), both who have strong Instagram followings will discuss their use of Instagram as a platform, how they got their following, and what they see the future of Instagram to be for photography. 

    Saturday Feb. 1,  5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.
    Photo Reps: The Inside Scoop
    Maren Levinson (RedEye), Jen Jenkins (Giant Artists), and more will be in dialogue about the current trends in photography and the role reps are taking as things change within the industry. 

    We will be exhibiting work from students, alumni and faculty. Here are some highlights from our curation:

    Service Learning: Pet Shoot 

    On December 2, our first-semester Lighting I students will be visiting the South LA pet shelter to photograph dogs and cats animals in need of a home. As part of our service and learning engaged curriculum, we are asking the students to evaluate three areas of service learning as they participate in this photoshoot and event: 

    Perspective Taking: the ability to engage and learn from perspectives and experiences different from one’s own and to understand how one’s place in the world both informs and limits one’s knowledge. 

    Social Responsibility: the ability to recognize one’s responsibilities to society–locally, nationally, and globally–and to develop a perspective on ethical and power relations both across the globe and within individual societies.

    Cultural Diversity: the ability to recognize the origins and influences of one’s own cultural heritage along with its limitations in providing all that one needs to know in the world. The students will submit final images that they shoot and a 1.5 page reflection paper in response to their experience. 

    Darkroom Class

    The black-and-white film photography class at NYFA is headed by Andrew Hall and has the darkroom at its heart. Offering hands-on experience of the art and craft of photography, this is our orange-lit haven in today’s storm of digital and manipulated imagery. 

    Getting back to the DNA of photography, students are introduced to the liberating process of creating their own images from scratch. This begins with processing their own films, then editing from contact prints, right through to creating beautifully crafted black-and-white prints, with a rich tonal range that remain unchallenged in their immediacy. The physicality of the entire endeavor enriches the photographers’ ability to communicate with their audience, and grants them ownership of the work in a unique way, when they have brought their whole project to life by their own skill, diligence and judgment. 

    The darkroom may be a Victorian creation, but thanks to the continued commitment of NYFA students and faculty, its creative relevance continues to evolve. 

    Sony Event 

    This year NYFA was selected to be invited to Sony’s EDU Class of 2019 Immersion Event in Los Angeles September 27-29, 2019. This is an annual workshop bringing together creators from the EDU community. Students and faculty expressed their creativity while learning from experienced coaches, along with the chance to win some great prizes! After the workshop, on October 3rd, there was an exhibition where students submitted work to be shown on display.

    Sony’s EDU Team and Artisans of Imagery lead a fabulous workshop for NYFA Photo students with Nino Rakichevich – Fashion Photography, Katrin Eismann – Street Photography, and 

    Brooke Shaden – Fine Art: Your Unique Style. They also held workshops in video with Eyenamics – Telling a Story, and Jeff Berlin – FS Series on Set.

    All attendees received a swag bag and had a chance to win a Sony Alpha camera with lens.

    If you want to be involved next time or have questions, please reach out to Sony directly at EDU@sony.com or (858)942-0099

    Alumni News

    Our BFA Alumni Lotta Lementti was featured in a cover story for Float Magazine for her contemporary Still Life Images. “With the series The Ordinary, I want the viewer to share my sense of wonder and joy in the ordinary objects of everyday life. I want to give the audience a moment to appreciate the things we so often take for granted and overlook.” 

    Our Current BFA student Eric James Cabral is working on a personal project documenting iconic rap and hip hop artists, including Big Boi from Outkast and Ice Cube.

    Graphic Design and Social Movements Class

    Our Graphic Design and Social Movements class covered the history of the relationship between print, design, and social justice movements. In addition to this, students were also introduced to the digital and analog skills required to develop a graphic design practice that responds to a social issue. Topics we covered included: the abolitionist press, suffragist press, early environmental and labor movement press, various printmaking collectives, anti-war media, agit-prop, street art as intervention, and aspects of social media’s potential for advocacy projects. 

    We explored a variety of US and international graphic design styles, uses, and purposes as they relate to specific moments in various struggles for social justice. We surveyed these technological and stylistic specifics and the impacts design has played in launching, growing, and spreading these transformative moments through the social fabric. At the heart of the class was the necessary intersectionality of contemporary social movements that link racial capitalism, gender oppression, ableism, homo- and transphobia, and ecological devastation with each other. 

    Through this lens we looked back at the politics and movements of the past century (and a few examples of further in the past) to examine how movement graphics, presses, and arts collectives have built an inspiring constellation of liberatory determination for designers and activists of today to draw on. Students engaged with this history and potential by planning, designing, and printing their own publications that related to an issue or concern of their choice. 

    Sneak Peek to the new FAYN, which is now a class:

    We are currently in production on our latest issue of FAYN, Gender and Sexuality.

    We are privileged to publish FAYN in LA and be within an academic environment that encourages diversity of thought and expression. Despite this, we as a society are still systematically plagued by gender-based discrimination and sexual oppression. For this next issue of FAYN we will focus on imagery and content that examines your beliefs, constraints, and ideas of gender and sexuality.

    We sought work that examines desire and the free expression of all genders and sexualities towards liberatory futures that free heteronormative patriarchal constructions that we have been conditioned to adhere to. 

    Now Casting: Actors and Models

    Photo Newsletter November 2019

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    December 2, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Photography, Student & Alumni Spotlights • Views: 230

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Acting for Film Instructors Act on Hit Sitcoms

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Students from New York Film Academy (NYFA) looking to see their instructors’ latest roles won’t have to look far—two instructors from the Acting for Film department at our Los Angeles campus are appearing in recurring roles on two high-profile sitcoms.

    sitcoms

    Bayo Akinfemi’s latest role is Goodwin on the CBS sitcom Bob Hearts Abishola, the latest project from sitcom megaproducer Chuck Lorre (Two and a Half Men, The Big Bang Theory.) The show stars Billy Gardell (Mike & Molly, Young Sheldon) and Folake Olowofoyeku (Transparent) and is about an American who falls in love with his Nigerian nurse.

    Akinfemi began his career as a director for stage and screen in Nigeria, has previously appeared on Agents of SHIELD, and action films Bulletproof Monk and The Tuxedo. He is a member of the Director’s Guild of Canada and has won multiple awards for his work behind the camera.

    Acting for Film instructor Ken Lerner continues his recurring role on ABC’s The Goldbergs, a period family sitcom taking place in the 1980s and starring Wendi McLendon-Covey, Jeff Garlin, and George Segal.

    Lerner’s previous credits are numerous; he has been acting professionally since the 1970s. He had recurring roles on hit series like Happy Days, Chicago Hope, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, as well as feature film credits including Robocop 2, The Running Man, and The Fabulous Baker Boys.

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    November 22, 2019 • Acting, Faculty Highlights • Views: 231

  • New York Film Academy Los Angeles (NYFA-LA) Associate Dean and Filmmaking Chair Colloborate for ‘The MisEducation of Bindu’

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    New York Film Academy (NYFA) Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Prarthana Mohan recently won the Indiana Spotlight Award for Best Director at the Heartland International Film Festival for her film The MisEducation of Bindu; NYFA Los Angeles Chair of Filmmaking Ed Timpe co-produced the film.

    The feature-length comedy tells the story of a bullied high school sophomore from India who must seek help from her classmates after forging her mother’s signature to test out of high school and discovering the test has a fee she cannot afford. The film co-stars Priyanka Bose, Megan Suri, and David Arquette (Scream, Never Been Kissed.)

    The MisEducation of Bindi was executive produced by the Duplass Brothers (Togetherness, Room 104) and was directed by Mohan, who co-wrote the screenplay with Kay Tuxford and co-produced the film with Ed Timpe. 

    The Miseducation of Bindu
    The production was shot in Indiana, where Timpe went to school, and is tied deeply to the community. “We really want to take the film back to Indiana,” Mohan tells IndyStar. “We want to take it back to Indianapolis and the communities nearby because they were so gracious and kind and welcoming.”

    The film screened at the state’s 28th annual Heartland International Film Festival, Indiana’s largest and longest-running fest. This year’s festival, which ran from October 10 – 20, featured more than 100 independent films, 200 visiting filmmakers, and 300 film screenings.

    New York Film Academy congratulates the filmmakers on the success of their film The MisEducation of Bindu and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Prarthana Mohan on her well-deserved Best Director award!

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    November 1, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Film Festivals, Film School, Filmmaking • Views: 420

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Cinematography Instructor Tommy Maddox-Upshaw Shoots Season 3 of FX’s ‘Snowfall’

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Tommy Maddox-Upshaw, director of photography and New York Film Academy (NYFA) Cinematography instructor, shot the third season of FX series Snowfall, which recently finished this Fall.

    Snowfall is the critically-acclaimed FX series Dave Andron co-created with iconic filmmaker John Singleton, who passed away earlier this year; Singleton was nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay for his debut film Boyz n the Hood, becoming the youngest person ever nominated for the former as well as the first African American.

    Snowfall is a period crime drama, set in 1983 Los Angeles and revolves around the crack epidemic that took the city by storm in the early 1980s. Maddox-Upshaw and Eliot Rockett alternated cinematographer duties for the show’s third season.

    Maddox-Upshaw is based in Los Angeles and teaches Cinematography at NYFA’s Burbank-based campus. He’s worked in both television and on feature films, including additional photography on Grown Ups 2, Beyond the Lights, and The Circle, and was the second unit director of photography on Straight Outta Compton. His credits as cinematographer include 48 Hours to Live, The Perfect Match, and Fixed.

    American Cinematographer, the international publication of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC), recently did an in-depth profile on Snowfall and its signature look, interviewing both Maddox-Upshaw and Rockett. The article got into the nuts and bolts about the new equipment the show used in its third season, as well as the complicated location shoot of the season’s penultimate episode, which involved shooting in a neighborhood once deeply affected by the drug crisis depicted in the show.

    Maddox-Upshaw went into great detail not just about equipment used and how his team used it, but also the combination of using set lights—along with smoke and other effects—with the bright, impossible-to-ignore sunlight of Los Angeles, and was clearly passionate about every aspect of his job on the FX drama.

    “My gaze is a little more personal,” Maddox-Upshaw tells ASC. “Being a kid who grew up in the ’80s and ’90s in Mattapan, the inner city of Boston, during the crack era, I saw a lot of these same things happen, the drugs and violence in my neighborhood and in my own family.” 

    New York Film Academy congratulates NYFA Cinematography instructor Tommy Maddox-Upshaw on shooting the latest season of Snowfall and looks forward to what projects he takes on next!

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 30, 2019 • Cinematography, Faculty Highlights • Views: 580

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Screenwriting Instructor Matt Harry Set to Release ‘Cryptozoology for Beginners’

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Matt Harry Cryptozoology for BeginnersCryptozoology for Beginners, the sequel to the popular book Sorcery for Beginners, will be released on November 5; both were written by New York Film Academy (NYFA) Screenwriting instructor Matt Harry.

    The second book in the Codex Arcanum series takes place six weeks after the dramatic events of Sorcery for Beginners and features series leads Trish, Owen, and Perry as they travel across the globe looking for fantastical creatures like the jackalope, chupacabra, and the altamaha-ha.

    In addition to being an author and NYFA Screenwriting instructor, Harry has also worked as a reality television writer, editor, director, and feature film producer; his credits include The Bachelor, Seriously Funny Kids, and Red Serpent, as well as Fugue, which Harry wrote and produced and which won Best Horror Film at the Mississippi Film Festival. Additionally, Harry has written and co-directed Super Kids for 1st Ave Machine/YouTube. He is currently developing a TV adaptation of Sorcery for Beginners as well as an animated pilot called Monster Cops.

    “I’ve met very few artistic geniuses,” Harry recently told NYFA in a Q&A, “but my own career is a testament to the fact that if you keep pushing, working, and revising, you’ll improve.”

    In that same interview, Harry cited writers and directors Ray Bradbury, Kurt Vonnegut, George Orwell, David Lynch, Edgar Wright, Colin Meloy, Madeline L’Engle, Stanley Kubrick, Philip Pullman, and Wes Anderson, as big influencers on his work.

    New York Film Academy congratulates NYFA Screenwriting instructor Matt Harry on the publication of his new book and encourages everyone to read Cryptozoology for Beginners as soon as possible! 

    Matt Harry Cryptozoology for Beginners

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 30, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 651

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Screenwriting Chair and Instructor Team Up for ‘Dragon Age’ Comic

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

     

    Dragon Age: Blue Wraith, the newest Dark Horse comic adaptation of popular video game franchise Dragon Age, is being written by New York Film Academy Los Angeles (NYFA-LA) Chair of Screenwriting Nunzio DeFilippis and NYFA-LA Screenwriting instructor Christina Weir.

    In addition to teaching at NYFA’s Burbank-based Screenwriting school, DeFilippis and Weir are married and have been writing partners for several years, working together on numerous projects like HBO’s Arli$$ and Disney Channel’s Kim Possible, as well as developing a video game at Sony and a TV movie at Oxygen.

    DeFilippis and Weir have been writing comic books for over 17 years, including New X-Men, Adventures of Superman, and Batman Confidential. They’ve created the comic franchises Bad Medicine (in development at Closed On Mondays with NBC), The Amy Devlin Mysteries (in development as a TV series at E!), and Frenemy of the State (co-created with Rashida Jones, optioned as a feature film by Imagine Entertainment/
    Universal Pictures).

    dragon age nunzio DeFilippis christina weir FEATUREDBlue Wraith is their latest comic in the world of Dragon Age; DeFilippis and Weir previously wrote Dragon Age: Knight Errant in 2017 and Dragon Age: Deception in 2018, both critically acclaimed series published by Dark Horse. Blue Wraith will feature Fenris, a fan-favorite character from Dragon Age II, the blockbuster video game released in 2011. The plot of their newest series has been described as: “Dragon Age: Blue Wraith starts off with the fanatical Qunari seeking to topple the Tevinter mageocracy. Caught in the middle, one powerful young mage’s desperate search for her father brings her face-to-face with a notorious mage hunter—Fenris, the Blue Wraith.”

    DeFilippis and Weir are joined by artist Fernando Heinz Furukawa and colorist Michael Atiyeh to being this latest series to life, with covers done by Sachin Teng. The writers also had to work closely with BioWare, the company that produces the Dragon Age franchise, to make sure the comics didn’t conflict with the video game world.

    “They are great collaborators,” Weir said about BioWare in an interview with ComicBook.com. “We have story conferences with them before starting a miniseries, and then they give notes along the way. Their notes are always driven by the same instincts we have: what’s the best story? How do [you] let this character grow or shine?”

    In the interview, DeFilippis talks about what set writing Blue Wraith apart from writing previous Dragon Age series: “We’re also painting on a bigger canvas than just the individual miniseries issue count. Knight Errant was very much a new thing, but it picked up characters from Magekiller. And from there, we’ve been telling one long quest—Knight Errant into Deception into Blue Wraith and beyond.”

    Dragon Age: Blue Wraith #1 is set to release on January 15, 2020 with the following two issues releasing after that. New York Film Academy congratulates NYFA-LA Screenwriting Chair Nunzio DeFilippis and NYFA-LA Screenwriting instructor Christina Weir on their work and encourages everyone to check out the comics when they’re published! 

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 28, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 601

  • New York Film Academy (NYFA) Faculty Spotlight on Jen Prince

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Like many residents of Los Angeles, Jen Prince moved to the city from somewhere else. Hailing from Texas, she ventured to Los Angeles to attend film school and has been carving out a niche in the LA indie film scene ever since. 

    As an award-winning producer, director, and editor, Jen’s love of music, movies, and theatre shine throughout her various projects. Currently, she is in post-production on her feature film directorial debut, Miles Underwater, which was the recipient of the Duplass Brothers Seed & Spark Production Grant. In addition, Jen is a vocal advocate for women in film, and teaches a wide array of courses for NYFA’s Producing Department, is the mother of four, and brings her love of guacamole with her from South Texas.    

    New York Film Academy (NYFA): Hailing from Texas, you say that your love of music, theater, and film began there. Could you discuss some of your earliest influences? 

    Jen Prince (JP): There was always music in my home. My parents both play instruments and encouraged me to play from a young age. I played in the city’s youth orchestra and participated in my high school theatre program, which was top notch and a pretty singular experience. It was through that study that I became passionate about working with actors and directing, and decided to pursue it in college. With very few examples of female directors I could find in the video store, I definitely took notice and was inspired early on by Jodie Foster, particularly because of her attention to the actor’s process. As I started to explore older films, I was also taken with Mike Nichols and have continued to find inspiration from his films and approach to directing. Sandra Cisneros isn’t a filmmaker, but I learned a lot about creating a sense of place and point of view from her writing. 

    NYFA: Your experience in film is extensive, as a writer, producer, director, and post- production supervisor. How did you find yourself wearing so many different hats in the entertainment industry? If you could pick just one, which would it be? 

    JP: While I was in school I tried my hand at everything because I felt that to be the best director and producer I could be I needed facility with the language and needs of each department. After a few years of post-production gigs in reality television, I found myself itching to make films again and was inspired by my colleague’s scripts. That led to my first feature as a producer and we successfully pulled off a micro-budget road movie. 

    I have continued to follow a low-budget model to create work that I want to see made and I love working as a creative producer in the indie world. I have always felt most at home as a director and am currently in post on my directorial feature debut Miles Underwater. All my different jobs have allowed me to make more work in less time than if I had waited for someone’s permission (and financing) to grant me the job. My willingness to wear all the hats has helped me greenlight my projects. 

    NYFA: As a vocal advocate for women and mothers in film, could you discuss some of the challenges they face in this business and what can be done to overcome these obstacles? Jen Prince

    JP: The statistics are real. Women, and particularly women of color, face well-established implicit and explicit bias when it comes to hiring women in film and, of course, in terms of equal pay. 

    The solution is to hire more women in EVERY position. Seek them out on your projects at every level. Look at your crew list and mandate diverse hires. If you are in the position to be a key in a department, request a new list of potential hires if what you are handed is all men or only has one person of color. The question is specifically about women in film, but of course we need better representation and intersectionality across all marginalized groups. Even on a student film—you are a gatekeeper to opportunity. I have produced four features and they have all had female DPs. Be the change you want to see. 

    I did not understand the challenge I faced when I graduated from film school. I was completely naive to the fact that just because I had passed the gatekeeper of acceptance to a top film school that in no way challenged the statistical almost certainty that I would not be given opportunities. We have to find our voice and press onward by demanding our successes be celebrated—by celebrating each other, by being patrons of each other’s work, by calling out bias, by HIRING OTHER WOMEN EVERY CHANCE WE GET. Stop waiting in line—this line is not for us. 

    NYFA: Any projects you would like to highlight? 

    JP: My two most recent completed indie features are available to stream online and rely almost entirely on word of mouth to be shared, so I’d love everyone to click on them. Quality Problems is a comedy I’m very proud to have made and it is the perfect antidote to cynicism. It’s a lovely film about a family (a real family) dealing with a health crisis while keeping their sense of humor and relationships intact. It was a joyful production and that shows up on screen. And Then There Was Eve is a drama featuring some incredible performances, cinematography, and music, a good example of what you can do with a little if you maximize resources in the right way. 

    NYFA: What are your favorite classes to teach at NYFA and why? 

    JP: One of my favorite classes is Directing for Producers. This subject teaches directing fundamentals through the lens of the producer—how do we support our directors, how do we ask the right questions to get their best work, how do we identify the biggest challenges and assets on each project? Most of these students have no experience working with actors and are fearful of that aspect of directing when we do our casting session, but by the end of the class they feel empowered to give direction and have a new respect for their process. I absolutely love the moment in class where they discover techniques for working with actors effectively and see it work in their films. 

    NYFA: What advice do you have for students looking to get into the entertainment industry? 

    JP: Figure out what is unique about your own worldview and find your confidence in your own voice, tastes, and personal mandates for your work. Take a look at the industry and look for the people doing work that aligns with you and these values. Try to keep getting closer to these circles. Network constantly. That means talk to people, but mostly LISTEN to people and ask thoughtful questions. Follow up on everything. Mean what you say. Support your peers work. Give more than you take. Show up as your authentic, kind self, every day everywhere (and work on being kind, we can all be kinder). Position yourself as close to the job you want to be doing as you can. Don’t stop writing, directing, producing, shooting, even if you have a day job. Don’t let anyone tell you what is impossible for you. 

    NYFA: Any advice on how to make killer guacamole? 

    JP: Yes. Diced tomatoes are key. Also, it always tastes better sharing with friends!

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 25, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Screenwriting • Views: 446

  • Q&A with Veteran Game Designer and NYFA Instructor Andrew Ashcraft

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    On Thursday, September 26, New York Film Academy hosted veteran and award-winning game designer and NYFA instructor Andrew Ashcraft.

    Ashcraft came to speak at NYFA as part of the school’s Masters of Game Design series, a speaker series in which distinguished members of the gaming industry visit for an informal chat with NYFA instructor Scott Rogers about their career in gaming. The series has included industry luminaries like Insomniac Games president Ted Price and veteran writer and game designer John Zuur Platten.

    The event was attended by over 50 students and industry professionals who has been invited by the school. Ashcraft and Rogers talked about Ashcraft’s 23-year career, starting with his early years at UCLA, before moving on to his transition into the gaming industry and his vast experience creating games for Sony Santa Monica, Disney Mobile, THQ, and Activision. Ashcraft’s career as an independent designer of board games and LARPs was also discussed. Audience attendees were then invited to ask Ashcraft a series of questions. 

    Andy Ashcraft

    In addition to working for major game development companies, Ashcraft teaches for the NYFA Game Design school at our Los Angeles campus, where students are given the chance to make multiple games, work with a variety of different professionals, and build their portfolio to help them find a game design career after college.

    New York Film Academy thanks instructor and veteran game designer Andrew Ashcraft for taking the time to speak with our students and sharing his expertise. 

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 18, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Game Design, Guest Speakers • Views: 655

  • ‘Don’t Look Now’ Gets 4K Digital Restoration from Criterion Collection 

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Forty-six years after its release, Don’t Look Now, the drama/thriller/horror directed by Nicolas Roeg and shot by New York Film Academy (NYFA) Los Angeles Chair of Cinematography Anthony B. Richmond, BSC, ASC, is still held up as a cinematic classic, so it’s no surprise that Criterion Collection has released a 4K digital restoration of the film.

    With the new restoration, many in the film world are taking another look at the beloved 1973 film, which stars Julie Christie and Donald Sutherland as a couple who’ve recently lost their daughter and come across a pair of elderly sisters—one of which claims to be a psychic in touch with the spirit of their child.

    Cinephilia & Beyond recently published an in-depth look at the film, including quotes from Roeg and Richmond. Cinephilia & Beyond started out as a small blog centered on independent film and has evolved into a community of passionate lovers of film, including A-list names like Guillermo del Toro, Ava DuVernay, and William Friedkin.

    The article, written by Jasun Horseley, takes the reader through the entire film from start to finish, with in-depth analysis on several key scenes, incorporating interviews and quotes from the filmmakers

    “It is a fabulous movie,” says Richmond, the director of photography for Don’t Look Now. “Not because I shot it, but it still stands up today. It was probably the most difficult thing I have shot, because in Venice everything goes in and out on barges. We shot it in the winter with an Italian crew, which was fantastic, because Venice in the winter is dark, cold and foreboding, which was wonderful.”

    Tony Richmond is the London-born, BAFTA-winning cinematographer who has shot numerous productions, including The Man Who Fell to Earth, The Sandlot, Legally Blonde, and Sympathy for the Devil. He is currently Chair of Cinematography at NYFA’s Los Angeles campus, where he works closely with talented, hard-working students. 

    Richmond also spoke with Antonia Quirke about Don’t Look Now on BBC’s Film Programme. Among other things discussed was the film’s infamous and oft-scrutinized sex scene between Sutherland and Christie. 

    The interview, which takes place during the first 11 minutes and 30 seconds of the show, can be found here.

    Don't Look Now

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 15, 2019 • Cinematography, Faculty Highlights • Views: 479

  • Photo Arts Conservatory at New York Film Academy Los Angeles (PAC at NYFA-LA) Faculty Updates

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    Here are the latest updates from faculty members of the Photo Arts Conservatory at New York Film Academy Los Angeles (PAC at NYFA-LA):

    Naomi White, Co-Char of the PAC at NYFA-LA will be appearing in the group show, XPOSED: Humans vs. Planet Earth at the Knox Contemporary gallery in Canada this month. She will be featuring her new work, “Time Capsules from the Anthropocene.”

    Of the work, White says, “Laws, societal norms, and culture in the Anthropocene view nature only in relation to how it serves humanity. Today, animals and their environments have no legal rights of their own, unless the extinction of animals, forests or oceans affects humans. The effects of our species are written into the rocks. Rocks are the black boxes, databases, cameras, recording our maniacal drive towards extinction. These pictures are visual constructions of what data might look like and say about this moment on earth … This work calls for consideration of new approaches, new perceptions, new ways of talking about and meeting the challenges of our time.”

    Amanda Rowan, Full Time Faculty and FAYN Editor of PAC at NYFA-LA has won the PDN (Photo District News) Fine Art Photographer of the Year award for her work in Still Life. Four of her images will be appearing as part of the PDN Awards opening at the Canoe Studios in Chelsea, NYC on October 21 to kick off the Photo + Expo.

    About the project, Rowan says, Ritual is a body of work that examines womanhood at the intersection of seduction and mysticism within the realm of traditional mating rituals. Working within the genres of still life and self-portraiture, I am shifting the gaze from voyeur to muse in an amalgamation of symbolism that explores notions of performance, power, and the act of vulnerability. I have constructed the moments using inherited clothing and objects from my late maternal grandmother. By pairing these pieces with symbolic organic matter, I am examining the history of conception, domesticity, and matriarchy within my personal and family narrative.”

    Kristine Tomaro, Photography Supervisor of PAC at NYFA-LA, is part of a group show and award fundraiser for the Los Angeles organization Las Foto Projects this month. The Foto Awards are presented by Las Fotos Project, a community-based nonprofit organization that inspires teenage girls through photography, mentorship, and self-expression; encouraging them to explore their identity, advocate for their community and create their future career.

    New York Film Academy congratulates the PAC at NYFA-LA faculty on their success and is proud to have such talented artists instructing the next generation of professional photographers!

    Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

    October 10, 2019 • Faculty Highlights, Photography • Views: 33